Cameron Indoor Stadium

Last updated
Cameron Indoor Stadium
Cameron indoor.jpg
North end in July 2002
Former namesDuke Indoor Stadium
(1940-1972)
Location115 Whitford Drive
Durham, North Carolina
Coordinates 35°59′51″N78°56′32″W / 35.9976°N 78.9422°W / 35.9976; -78.9422 Coordinates: 35°59′51″N78°56′32″W / 35.9976°N 78.9422°W / 35.9976; -78.9422
OperatorDuke University
Capacity 9,314 (1988–present)
8,800 (1940–88)
SurfaceHardwood
Construction
OpenedJanuary 6, 1940
79 years ago
Renovated1987–88, 2002, 2008, 2009
Construction cost$400,000
($7.15 million in 2018 dollars [1] )
ArchitectHorace Trumbauer
Julian Abele
Tenants
Duke Blue Devils (NCAA)
Men's basketball (1940–present)
Women's basketball (1975–present)
Women's volleyball (1975–present)
Usa edcp relief location map.png
Red pog.svg
Durham 
Location in the United States

Cameron Indoor Stadium is an indoor arena located on the campus of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. The 9,314-seat facility is the primary indoor athletic venue for the Duke Blue Devils and serves as the home court for Duke men's and women's basketball and women's volleyball. It opened in January 1940 and was known as Duke Indoor Stadium until 1972, when it was named for Eddie Cameron, who served at Duke as men's basketball coach from 1928 to 1942, football coach from 1942 to 1945, and athletic director from 1951 to 1972. The arena is located adjacent to its predecessor, Card Gymnasium, which opened in 1930.

Duke University Private university in Durham, North Carolina, United States

Duke University is a private research university in Durham, North Carolina. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. In 1924, tobacco and electric power industrialist James Buchanan Duke established The Duke Endowment and the institution changed its name to honor his deceased father, Washington Duke.

Durham, North Carolina City in North Carolina, United States

Durham (/ˈdʌrəm/) is a city in and the county seat of Durham County in the U.S. state of North Carolina. Small portions of the city limits extend into Orange County and Wake County. The U.S. Census Bureau estimated the city's population to be 274,291 as of July 1, 2018, making it the 4th-most populous city in North Carolina, and the 79th-most populous city in the United States. The city is located in the east-central part of the Piedmont region along the Eno River. Durham is the core of the four-county Durham-Chapel Hill Metropolitan Area, which has a population of 542,710 as of U.S. Census 2014 Population Estimates. The US Office of Management and Budget also includes Durham as a part of the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill Combined Statistical Area, commonly known as the Research Triangle, which has a population of 2,037,430 as of U.S. Census 2014 Population Estimates.

Duke Blue Devils intercollegiate sports teams of Duke University

The Duke Blue Devils are the athletic teams that represent Duke University, featuring 27 varsity teams in the NCAA Division I. The name comes from the French "les Diables Bleus" or "the Blue Devils," which was the nickname given during World War I to the Chasseurs Alpins, the French Alpine light infantry battalion.

Contents

History

Summer of 2006 Cameron Indoor Stadium interior.jpg
Summer of 2006

The plans for the stadium were drawn up in 1935 by basketball coach Eddie Cameron. The stadium was designed by Julian Abele, who studied at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, France. The same architectural firm that built the Palestra was brought in to build the new stadium. The arena was dedicated on January 6, 1940, having cost $400,000. At the time, it was the largest gymnasium in the country south of the Palestra at the University of Pennsylvania. Originally called "Duke Indoor Stadium", it was renamed for Cameron on January 22, 1972. [2] The first nationally televised game took place on January 28, 1979 against Marquette, it was broadcast by NBC and won by Duke 69–64. [3] Regionally televised games in the Atlantic Coast Conference, including from the (then) Duke Indoor Stadium, had begun in the late 1950s. [4]

Edmund McCullough Cameron was an American football and basketball player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head basketball coach at Washington and Lee University for one season in 1924–25 and at Duke University from 1928 to 1942, compiling a career college basketball record of 234–104. Cameron was also the head football coach at Duke University from 1942 to 1945, tallying a mark of 25–11–1, and the athletic director at the school from 1951 to 1972. Cameron was part of Duke athletics from 1926 to 1972, the second longest tenure in the school's history. Duke's home basketball arena was renamed as Cameron Indoor Stadium in his honor in 1972.

Julian Abele American architect

Julian Francis Abele was a prominent African-American architect, and chief designer in the offices of Horace Trumbauer. He contributed to the design of more than 400 buildings, including the Widener Memorial Library at Harvard University (1912–15), Philadelphia's Central Library (1917–27), and the Philadelphia Museum of Art (1914–28). He was the primary designer of the west campus of Duke University (1924–54).

Palestra sports center

The Palestra, often called the Cathedral of College Basketball, is an historic arena and the home gym of the Penn Quakers men's and women's basketball teams, volleyball teams, wrestling team, and Philadelphia Big 5 basketball. Located at 235 South 33rd St. in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania, near Franklin Field in the University City section of Philadelphia, it opened on January 1, 1927. The Palestra has been called "the most important building in the history of college basketball" and "changed the entire history of the sport for which it was built."

The building originally included seating for 8,800, though standing room was sufficient to ensure that 9,500 could fit in on a particularly busy day. Then, as now, Duke students were allocated a large number of the seats, including those in the lower sections directly alongside the court. Renovations in 1987–1988 removed the standing room areas, added an electronic scoreboard and display over center court, wood paneling, brass railings and student seats, bringing capacity to 9,314, though now there is sufficient standing room to ensure 10,000 could fit. For high profile games, students are known to pack in as many as 1,600 into the student sections, designed for a maximum of 1,100. Prior to the 2002–2003 basketball season, air conditioning units were installed in Cameron for the first time as a response to health and odor concerns for players and fans alike. [5] Prior to the 2008–09 season, a new video scoreboard replaced the electronic board over center court. [6] Before the 2009–10 season, additional changes were made, including installing LED ribbon boards to the front of the press table and painting the upper seats Duke blue. [7]

Atmosphere

The students and fans are known as "Cameron Crazies" for their support of the team and loud cheering that has been recorded as high as 121.3 dB, which is louder than a power saw at 3 feet or a jackhammer. [8]

Cameron Crazies student section supporting Duke Blue Devils

The Cameron Crazies are the student section supporting the Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team and the Duke Blue Devils women's basketball team. The section can hold approximately 1,200 occupants. The section, also deemed "The Zoo" by Al McGuire for their humorous pranks, and "The Sixth-Man" by Duke men's basketball head coach Mike Krzyzewski, is known for being "rude, crude and lewd – as well as cleverly funny," stated Frank Vehorn of the Virginian-Pilot. The Crazies are famous for painting their bodies blue and white or wearing outrageous outfits. They start their cheering as soon as warm-ups begin. Throughout the game, the Crazies jump up and down when the opposing team has possession of the ball and yell cheers in unison at focal points of the game.

The decibel is a unit of measurement used to express the ratio of one value of a power or field quantity to another, on a logarithmic scale, the logarithmic quantity being called the power level or field level, respectively. It can be used to express a change in value or an absolute value. In the latter case, it expresses the ratio of a value to a fixed reference value; when used in this way, a suffix that indicates the reference value is often appended to the decibel symbol. For example, if the reference value is 1 volt, then the suffix is "V", and if the reference value is one milliwatt, then the suffix is "m".

For access to major games, including those against the University of North Carolina, students reside in tents for months in an area outside of Cameron known as "Krzyzewskiville". The hardwood floor was dedicated and renamed Coach K Court in November 2000. [9]

Krzyzewskiville queue for major Duke Blue Devils mens basketball games

Krzyzewskiville, or K-ville for short, is a phenomenon that occurs before major men's basketball games at Duke University. In simplest terms, it is the line for undergraduate students wishing to gain access to the designated tenting games. It is often mistakenly referred to as a ticket line. However, there are no student tickets; students are admitted from the line an hour and a half before each game.

DUKEvUNC 2018-03-03 - Post-game panorama.jpg
Duke players address the fans following a game against North Carolina in March 2018.
Duke Blue Devils vs. Virginia Tech Hokies, February 2018 Cameron2018214.jpeg
Duke Blue Devils vs. Virginia Tech Hokies, February 2018

Media coverage

Sports Illustrated ranked it fourth on its list of the top 20 sporting venues of the 20th century, and USA Today referred to it as "the toughest road game in the ACC." [10]

<i>Sports Illustrated</i> American sports magazine

Sports Illustrated (SI) is an American sports magazine owned by Authentic Brands Group. First published in August 1954, it has over 3 million subscribers and is read by 23 million people each week, including over 18 million men.

<i>USA Today</i> American national daily newspaper

USA Today is an internationally distributed American daily, middle-market newspaper that serves as the flagship publication of its owner, the Gannett Company. Founded by Al Neuharth on September 15, 1982, it operates from Gannett's corporate headquarters on Jones Branch Drive, in McLean, Virginia. It is printed at 37 sites across the United States and at five additional sites internationally. Its dynamic design influenced the style of local, regional, and national newspapers worldwide, through its use of concise reports, colorized images, informational graphics, and inclusion of popular culture stories, among other distinct features.

Milestone games

Exterior of Cameron Indoor Stadium as seen from Krzyzewskiville CameronIndoor.jpg
Exterior of Cameron Indoor Stadium as seen from Krzyzewskiville
Game no.DateResult
Game 1January 6, 1940Duke 36, Princeton 27
Game 100January 24, 1948Duke 52, Virginia Tech 45
Game 200February 5, 1957Duke 90, Pittsburgh 72
Game 300January 28, 1967Duke 99, North Carolina State 60
Game 400February 25, 1976Clemson 90, Duke 89
Game 500January 11, 1984Duke 73, Appalachian State 60
Game 600December 1, 1990Duke 111, Charlotte 94
Game 700February 2, 1997Duke 70, Georgia Tech 61
Game 800February 8, 2004Duke 81, Clemson 55
Game 900February 4, 2010Duke 86, Georgia Tech 67
Game 1,000February 8, 2016Duke 72, Louisville 65

 Sources: Statistics published by Duke University as of the end of the 2014 season 2014–2015 Duke Men's Basketball Media Guide;

Additionally, the facility hosted the Southern Conference men's basketball tournament from 1947 to 1950 and the MEAC Men's Basketball Tournament in 1972 and 1973.

Home court advantage

Records at Cameron Indoor Stadium
All-Time: 832–154 (.844) [11]
Coach K: 474–59 (.889) [11]
Since 1997-98: 266–17 (.940) [11]

Duke is 179-12 (.937) at home since the 2004–05 season, second only to Allen Fieldhouse in winning percentage at home.

Non-conference win streaks

On November 15, 2019, the Duke men's team extended its non-conference home winning streak to 150 games with a 74-63 victory over Georgia State. This streak is the longest active non-conference home winning streak in college basketball, with Duke's last non-conference home loss also coming against St. John’s almost 19 years earlier on February 26, 2000, when the then #2 Blue Devils lost 83–82.

The streak is the longest non-conference home win streak in Duke men's basketball history, breaking the previous record, which lasted 95 games, from February 2, 1983 to December 2, 1995, beginning with a 73–71 win over William & Mary and ending with a 65–75 loss to Illinois.

Duke is now 274-3 in non-conference home games since 1983, starting with the win over William and Mary, having gone 32-3 in home non-conference games between the original and current winning streaks. The only loss other than the Illinois and St. John's losses during that span coming at the hands of Michigan 61-62 on December 8, 1996. [12] [13] [14]

See also

Related Research Articles

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Xfinity Center is the indoor arena and student activities center that serves as the home of the University of Maryland Terrapins men's and women's basketball teams. Ground was broken in May 2000 and construction was completed in October 2002 at a cost of $125 million. It replaced Cole Field House as the Terrapins' home court, which had served as the home of Maryland basketball since 1955.

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Carolina–Duke rivalry

The Carolina–Duke rivalry refers to the rivalry between the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill Tar Heels (Carolina) and Duke University Blue Devils (Duke). It most often refers to the athletic rivalries between the Duke Blue Devils and North Carolina Tar Heels athletic teams. The North Carolina–Duke rivalry is fierce, particularly in men's college basketball. It is considered one of the most intense rivalries in all of US-sports: a poll conducted by ESPN in 2000 ranked the basketball rivalry as the third greatest North American sports rivalry, and Sports Illustrated on Campus named it the #1 "Hottest Rivalry" in college basketball and the #2 rivalry overall in its November 18, 2003 issue. The intensity of the rivalry is augmented by the proximity of the two universities—they are located only ten miles apart along U.S. Highway 15–501 or eight miles apart in straight-line distance. In addition, both Duke and North Carolina are considered highly prestigious universities, which, coupled with their vastly different funding structures and cultures—North Carolina is a public school while Duke is private—contributes to the intensity of the rivalry.

The 1985–86 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The head coach was Mike Krzyzewski. The team played its home games in the Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina, and was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

The 1993–94 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The head coach was Mike Krzyzewski. The team played its home games in the Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina, and was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

The 1977–78 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The head coach was Bill Foster. The team played its home games in the Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina, and was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

The 1962–63 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The head coach was Vic Bubas. The team played its home games in the Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina, and was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

The 1998–99 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The head coach was Mike Krzyzewski. The team played its home games in the Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina, and was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

The 1963–64 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The head coach was Vic Bubas. The team played its home games in the Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina, and was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

1999–2000 Duke Blue Devils mens basketball team

The 1999–2000 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University. The head coach was Mike Krzyzewski. The team played its home games in the Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina, and was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

Card Gymnasium arena at Duke University

Card Gymnasium is a multi-purpose arena in Durham, North Carolina. It was home to the Duke University Blue Devils basketball team from its opening in 1930 until Cameron Indoor Stadium opened in 1940. During its years as home to the men’s basketball team, it had a capacity of approximately 4,000. It was originally named “Duke Gymnasium” before being named after former Blue Devils head basketball coach, Wilbur Wade Card, in 1958. It currently serves as the home to Duke Wrestling and Fencing.

The 1999–2000 Maryland Terrapins men's basketball team represented the University of Maryland in the 1999–2000 college basketball season as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The team was led by head coach Gary Williams and played their home games at the Cole Field House. They lost to UCLA in the 2000 NCAA Tournament.

2013–14 Duke Blue Devils mens basketball team

The 2013–14 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University during the 2013–14 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. They were led by thirty-fourth year and Hall of Fame head coach Mike Krzyzewski. They played its home games at Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They finished the season 26–9, 13–5 in ACC play to finish in a tie for third place. They advanced to the championship game of the ACC Tournament where they lost to Virginia. They received an at-large bid to the NCAA Tournament where they lost in the second round to Mercer.

2015–16 Duke Blue Devils womens basketball team

The 2015–16 Duke Blue Devils women's basketball team represented Duke University during the 2015–16 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. Returning as head coach was Joanne P. McCallie entering her 9th season. The team played its home games at Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They finished the season 20–12, 8–8 in ACC play, to finish in a tie for seventh place. They advanced to the quarterfinals of the ACC Women's Tournament to Notre Dame. They missed the NCAA tournament for the first time since 1994 and they were also not invited to the Women's National Invitation Tournament for the first time in 21 years due to a limited roster.

2016–17 Duke Blue Devils mens basketball team

The 2016–17 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University during the 2016–17 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. They were coached by a 37th-year head coach, Mike Krzyzewski. Starting on January 7, Jeff Capel temporarily took over coaching duties while Krzyzewski recovers from lower back surgery. The Blue Devils played their home games at Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They finished the season 28–9, 11–7 in ACC play to finish in fifth place. They became the first ACC team to win four games in four days on their way to winning the ACC Tournament. They received the ACC's automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament where they defeated Troy in the first round to advance to the second round where they lost to South Carolina.

2016–17 Duke Blue Devils womens basketball team

The 2016–17 Duke Blue Devils women's basketball team represented Duke University during the 2016–17 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. Returning as head coach was Joanne P. McCallie entering her 10th season. The team plays its home games at Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They finished the season 28–6, 13–3 in ACC play to finish in a tie for second place. They advanced to the championship game of the ACC Women's Tournament where they lost to Notre Dame. They received an at-large bid to the NCAA Women's Tournament where they defeated Hampton in the first round before getting upset by Oregon in the second round.

2017–18 Duke Blue Devils mens basketball team

The 2017–18 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team represented Duke University during the 2017–18 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. They were coached by 38th-year head coach, Mike Krzyzewski. The Blue Devils played their home games at Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They finished the season 29–8, 13–5 in ACC play to finish in second place. They defeated Notre Dame in the quarterfinals of the ACC Tournament before losing to North Carolina in the semifinals. They received an at-large bid to the NCAA Tournament as the No. 2 seed in the Midwest region. There they defeated Iona, Rhode Island, and Syracuse to advance to the Elite Eight. In the Elite Eight, they lost to No. 1 seed Kansas in overtime.

2017–18 Duke Blue Devils womens basketball team

The 2017–18 Duke Blue Devils women's basketball team represented Duke University during the 2017–18 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. Their head coach was Joanne P. McCallie in her 11th season at Duke. The Blue Devils played theirs home games at Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They finished the season 24–9, 11–5 in ACC play to finish in a tie for fourth place. They lost in the quarterfinals of the ACC Women's Tournament to NC State. They received at-large bid of the NCAA Women's Tournament where they defeated Belmont and Georgia before losing to Connecticut in the Sweet Sixteen.

2019–20 Duke Blue Devils mens basketball team

The 2019–20 Duke Blue Devils men's basketball team will represents Duke University during the 2019–20 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. They will be coached by 40th-year head coach, Mike Krzyzewski. The Blue Devils will play their home games at Cameron Indoor Stadium in Durham, North Carolina, as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

References

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  3. The Encyclopedia of Duke Basketball. Roth, John. Duke University Press. 2006.
  4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raycom_Sports
  5. Lewis, Julia (July 29, 2002). "'Cool' To Be A Duke Fan? Cameron Indoor Stadium To Get AC". WRAL . Raleigh. Retrieved March 6, 2008.
  6. "'Duke University Video Display Photo'".
  7. "Cameron Indoor Stadium Receives Enhancements". Duke Sports Information. September 13, 2009. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  8. Wolf, Benjamin A. "Decible Meter Picture from February 9, 2011 Game Against the University of North Carolina" . Retrieved March 23, 2018.
  9. Keohane, Nannerl O. (November 20, 2000). "MEMORANDUM: Summary of Activities" (PDF). Retrieved March 6, 2008.
  10. "SI's Top 20 Venues of the 20th Century". Sports Illustrated . June 2, 1999. Retrieved February 19, 2013.
  11. 1 2 3 "Duke Blue Devils Basketball Statistical Database—Season by Season". StatsGeek.com. Retrieved May 13, 2015.
  12. "Cameron Indoor Records" (PDF). Duke Sports Information. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 30, 2007. Retrieved March 6, 2008.
  13. "1982-83 Season and Results". StatsGeek.com. Retrieved March 6, 2008.
  14. "2018-19 Duke Men's Basketball Media Guide" . Retrieved June 21, 2019.