Carmichael Arena

Last updated
Carmichael Arena
Carmichael Auditorium.jpg
Interior in 2006, before renovation
Full nameWilliam Donald Carmichael, Jr. Arena
Former namesCarmichael Auditorium (1965–2010)
Location310 South Rd, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
Coordinates 35°54.57155′N79°2.72447′W / 35.90952583°N 79.04540783°W / 35.90952583; -79.04540783 Coordinates: 35°54.57155′N79°2.72447′W / 35.90952583°N 79.04540783°W / 35.90952583; -79.04540783
Owner University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
OperatorUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Capacity 6,822 [1]
Construction
OpenedDecember 4, 1965
Renovated1998, 2008–2009
Expanded1976
Construction cost$36.4 million (2008-09 renovation) [2]
ArchitectCorley Redfoot Architects (2008-09 renovation)
Structural engineerLHC Structural Engineers (2008-09 renovation)
Tenants
North Carolina Tar Heels (NCAA)
Men's basketball (1965–1986)
Women's basketball (1975–present)
Women's gymnastics (1982–present)
Wrestling (1965–present)

William Donald Carmichael, Jr. Arena is a multi-purpose arena in on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. It is home to four Tar Heels athletic teams: women's basketball, women's volleyball, women's gymnastics, and wrestling.

Arena enclosed area designed to showcase theater, musical performances, or sporting events

An arena is an enclosed area, often circular or oval-shaped, designed to showcase theatre, musical performances, or sporting events. It is composed of a large open space surrounded on most or all sides by tiered seating for spectators, and may be covered by a roof. The key feature of an arena is that the event space is the lowest point, allowing maximum visibility. Arenas are usually designed to accommodate a multitude of spectators.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill public research university in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, also known as UNC-Chapel Hill, UNC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, or simply Carolina is a public research university in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. It is the flagship of the 17 campuses of the University of North Carolina system. After being chartered in 1789, the university first began enrolling students in 1795, which also allows it to be one of three schools to claim the title of the oldest public university in the United States. Among the claimants, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the only one to have held classes and graduated students as a public university in the eighteenth century.

Chapel Hill, North Carolina town in Orange County, North Carolina, United States

Chapel Hill is a town in Orange, Chatham, and Durham counties in the U.S. state of North Carolina. Its population was 57,233 in the 2010 census, making Chapel Hill the 15th-largest city in the state. Chapel Hill, Durham, and the state capital, Raleigh, make up the corners of the Research Triangle, with a total population of 1,998,808.

Contents

The arena opened in 1965 as Carmichael Auditorium and is named for William Donald Carmichael, Jr., a popular former school vice-president and brother of All-America basketball player Cartwright Carmichael. Although it was apparent by the early 1960s that the men's basketball team needed a new home to replace 27-year-old Woollen Gymnasium, the state refused to fund a completely new arena. As a result, Carmichael was built as an annex to Woollen; it shares the older facility's eastern wall. It originally seated just over 8,800 people, but expansions over the years brought its final capacity to 10,180 by the time the men left for the Dean Smith Center in 1986. In 1976, the capacity was increased from 8,800 to 10,000. [3] In their last game at Carmichael, the North Carolina Tar Heels beat the North Carolina State Wolfpack 90-79, to finish with a record of 169-20 at Carmichael. [4] After a remodeling project completed in 2009, capacity is 8,010.

An All-America team is a hypothetical American sports team composed of outstanding amateur players. These players are broadly considered by media and other relevant commentators as the best players in a particular sport, of a specific season, for each team position.

Cartwright Carmichael American basketball player

Richard Cartwright "Cart" Carmichael was the first member of the North Carolina Tar Heels to earn All-America honors in any sport, when he was named to the 1923 first team for men's basketball, an honor he also received in 1924. He also lettered as an outfielder for the UNC baseball team. Carmichael was a member of the basketball team named 1922 and 1924 "Champions of the South" after winning the Southern Conference tournament at the Atlanta Municipal Auditorium. The squad was retrospectively awarded the 1924 national championship by the Helms Athletic Foundation some eleven years later. In addition to two regular season and two postseason conference championships, he was a three time All-Southern Conference selection. In 1922, he and his brother, Billy, became the first brothers to ever play together on the same Tar Heel basketball team. Billy was later vice-president of the Consolidated University of North Carolina and for whom the William D. Carmichael Jr. Auditorium on campus was named.

North Carolina Tar Heels mens basketball

The North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball program is the intercollegiate men's basketball team of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The Tar Heels have won seven NCAA men's college national championships. North Carolina's six NCAA Tournament Championships are third-most all-time, behind University of California, Los Angeles(11) and University of Kentucky(8). They have also won 18 Atlantic Coast Conference tournament titles, 32 Atlantic Coast Conference regular season titles, and an Atlantic Coast Conference record 20 outright Regular Season Championships. The program has produced many notable players who went on to play in the NBA, including three of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History: Billy Cunningham, Michael Jordan and James Worthy. Many Tar Heel assistant coaches have gone on to become head coaches elsewhere.

Carmichael was known as one of the loudest arenas in the country while the Tar Heel men played there, largely because of a low roof and a student section that ringed the court. During a 1982 game against the Virginia Cavaliers, it was so loud that the Virginia players could not even hear their own names being announced prior to the start of the game. [5] In part due to this formidable home court advantage, the men had a record of 169-20 (.894) in just over 20 seasons there. Dean Smith was the Tar Heels' coach for their entire tenure in Carmichael. The Tar Heels won their second NCAA title in 1981-82, while playing at the arena.

Virginia Cavaliers intercollegiate sports teams of the University of Virginia

The Virginia Cavaliers, also known as Wahoos or Hoos, are the athletic teams representing the University of Virginia, located in Charlottesville. They compete at the NCAA Division I level, in the Atlantic Coast Conference since 1953. Known simply as Virginia in sports media, UVA has twice won the Capital One Cup for men's sports after leading the nation in overall athletic excellence. The Cavaliers have regularly placed among the Top 5 nationally.

Dean Smith American basketball coach

Dean Edwards Smith was an American men's college basketball head coach. Called a "coaching legend" by the Basketball Hall of Fame, he coached for 36 years at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Smith coached from 1961 to 1997 and retired with 879 victories, which was the NCAA Division I men's basketball record at that time. Smith had the 9th highest winning percentage of any men's college basketball coach (77.6%). During his tenure as head coach, North Carolina won two national championships and appeared in 11 Final Fours. Smith played college basketball at the University of Kansas, where he won a national championship in 1952 playing for Hall of fame coach Phog Allen.

Carmichael Auditorium, circa 1968 Carmichael Auditorium 1968.jpg
Carmichael Auditorium, circa 1968

A new floor was installed in 1998, after a roof fire that occurred in February during renovations. The arena was completely remodeled beginning in spring 2008, and the women's team joined the men in the Dean Smith Center until completion in December 2009. The facility was officially renamed Carmichael Arena during the women's team's matchup against rival Duke on February 28, 2010.

Duke Blue Devils intercollegiate sports teams of Duke University

The Duke Blue Devils are the athletic teams that represent Duke University, featuring 27 varsity teams in the NCAA Division I. The name comes from the French "les Diables Bleus" or "the Blue Devils," which was the nickname given during World War I to the Chasseurs Alpins, the French Alpine light infantry battalion.

The men's team played their first round home game of the 2010 National Invitation Tournament at Carmichael because renovations were taking place at the Smith Center. On March 16, 2010, they defeated William & Mary in their first official game at Carmichael in 24 years. [6] Coincidentally, William & Mary was the first-ever opponent for the men's basketball team in Carmichael Arena in 1965.

The 2010 National Invitation Tournament was a single-elimination tournament of 32 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I teams that were not selected to participate in the 2010 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. The 73rd annual tournament began on March 16 on campus sites and ended on April 1 at Madison Square Garden in New York City. Dayton won their 3rd NIT title over North Carolina, 79–68.

William & Mary Tribe mens basketball

The William & Mary Tribe men's basketball team represents the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia in NCAA Division I competition. The school's team competes in the Colonial Athletic Association and play their home games in Kaplan Arena. William and Mary Coach, Dane Fischer was hired as the 31st coach in school history following the dismissal of Coach Tony Shaver. Shaver served as the head coach from 2003-2019 and leads the school in all-time wins for a coach.

The arena hosted a speech by President Barack Obama on April 24, 2012.

See also

Related Research Articles

Dean Smith Center

The Dean E. Smith Student Activities Center is a multi-purpose arena in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, used primarily as the home for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Tar Heels men's basketball team. The university began to inquire about building a standalone arena for the men's basketball team beginning in the mid-1970s, but due to an ongoing university wide fundraiser, the investigation halted until its conclusion. On June 1980, the fundraising began with a goal of atleast $30 million and a target completion date for the building of December 1984. It was intentionally planned to be called the Student Activities Center; however, after its announcement it began to be referred to as the The Dean Dome and it was speculated it would be named for then coach Dean Smith. The fundraising concluded in August 1984 with over $33 million raised, but construction would not finished until 1986. The day before the opening game on January 18, 1986 against the Duke Blue Devils, the building was officially announced to be named the Dean E. Smith Student Activities Center, while a formal dedication happen later in September. On August 24, 2018, the hardwood floor of the Smith Center was named for then coach Roy Williams.

Tin Can (basketball arena)

Officially named the Indoor Athletic Center , the Tin Can was the home of North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball from the 1924 season until the team's relocation to the Woollen Gymnasium in 1938. It replaced Bynum Gymnasium, a venue known for its unusual running track suspended above the court. Two thousand people turned for the first game in the Tin Can when the Tar Heels beat Mercer 34-23. The Tin Can was constructed for $6,741,72. The venue was constructed from steel and did not have heating, which led players to wear sweatshirts and gloves while warming up. Heating was installed in 1929, but players and coaches still complained about the temperature.

Carolina–Duke rivalry

The Carolina–Duke rivalry refers to the rivalry between the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill Tar Heels (Carolina) and Duke University Blue Devils (Duke). It most often refers to the athletic rivalries between the Duke Blue Devils and North Carolina Tar Heels athletic teams. The North Carolina–Duke rivalry is fierce, particularly in men's college basketball. It is considered one of the most intense rivalries in all of US-sports: a poll conducted by ESPN in 2000 ranked the basketball rivalry as the third greatest North American sports rivalry, and Sports Illustrated on Campus named it the #1 "Hottest Rivalry" in college basketball and the #2 rivalry overall in its November 18, 2003 issue. The intensity of the rivalry is augmented by the proximity of the two universities—they are located only ten miles apart along U.S. Highway 15–501 or eight miles apart in straight-line distance. In addition, both Duke and North Carolina are considered highly prestigious universities, which, coupled with their vastly different funding structures and cultures—North Carolina is a public school while Duke is private—contributes to the intensity of the rivalry.

Woollen Gymnasium

Woollen Gymnasium was the home of the University of North Carolina's physical education classes from 1937, and the North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team from early 1938. The Gymnasium was named after Charles T. Woollen, Class of 1905. The gymnasium replaced the nearby arena colloquially known as the Tin Can. The Woollen Gymnasium was the home court of Tar Heel basketball until 1965, when Carmichael Auditorium was completed as an annex to Woollen, sharing the Gymnasium's eastern wall. North Carolina won its first NCAA basketball title in 1957 while playing at Woollen.

North Carolina Tar Heels womens basketball womens college basketball team

The North Carolina Tar Heels women's basketball team represent the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the Atlantic Coast Conference of NCAA Division I women's basketball. They are led by head coach Courtney Banghart, entering her first season.

Bynum Gymnasium

Bynum Gymnasium was the first home of North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball. It was built in 1904 as a general gymnasium and swimming pool, and hosted the basketball team for the first fourteen years of its existence (1910–24). The most distinctive feature of the gymnasium was its second level running track suspended above the court. No longer needed for its original purpose after Woollen Gymnasium was built, the building was remodeled internally as offices and renamed Bynum Hall. As of 2008, it is the Graduate Admissions Office.

The 1961–62 North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team was Dean Smith's first as the head coach at North Carolina. The 1961–62 team finished with an 8–9 overall record, despite a young and inexperienced roster. They tied for fourth in the Atlantic Coast Conference with a 7–7 record. Their season ended with a first round loss in the ACC Tournament to South Carolina. This was Dean Smith's only losing season as a head coach at North Carolina.

2009–10 North Carolina Tar Heels mens basketball team 2010 NIT Finalist

The 2009–10 North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team represented the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Their head coach was Roy Williams. The team played its home games in the Dean Smith Center in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and is a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They were the defending National Champions. This season represented the 100th season of basketball in the school's history.

The 2013–14 North Carolina Tar Heels women's basketball team will represent the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the 2013–14 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. The Tar Heels, led by twenty-eighth year head coach Sylvia Hatchell, they played their games at Carmichael Arena and are members of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

The 1976–77 North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team represented the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the 1976–77 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Tar Heels were coached by Dean Smith in his 16th season at North Carolina. They played their home games in Carmichael Auditorium as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They finished the season 28–5, 9–3 in ACC play to win the ACC regular season championship. They defeated NC State and Virginia to win the ACC Tournament. As a result, the received the conference's automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament. There, they defeated Purdue, Notre Dame, and Kentucky to advance to the Final Four. At the Final Four, they defeated UNLV before losing to Marquette in the National Championship game.

The 1964–65 North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team represented the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the 1964–65 men's college basketball season.

The 2003–04 North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team represented the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the 2003–04 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. Their head coach was Roy Williams. No team captains were selected for this season, the first, and so far, only time this has happened in program history. The team played its home games in the Dean Smith Center in Chapel Hill, North Carolina as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

The 2001–02 North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team represented the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the 2001–02 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. Their head coach was Matt Doherty. The team captains for this season were Jason Capel and Kris Lang. The team played its home games in the Dean Smith Center in Chapel Hill, North Carolina as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

The 1986–87 North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team represented the University of North Carolina from Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

The 1985–86 North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team represented the University of North Carolina from Chapel Hill, North Carolina during the 1985–86 NCAA Division I men's basketball season.

2019–20 North Carolina Tar Heels mens basketball team

The 2019–20 North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team will represent the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the 2019–20 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The team's head coach is Roy Williams, who is in his 17th season as UNC's head men's basketball coach. The Tar Heels play their home games at the Dean Smith Center in Chapel Hill, North Carolina as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

References

Citations

  1. http://www.goheels.com/ViewArticle.dbml?ATCLID=205731428
  2. http://fpcfeed.facilities.unc.edu/CIProjectDetails.aspx?ProjectID=281
  3. Thomas Rogers (January 5, 1986). "House That $ Built". The New York Times (subscription required). p. 10. ProQuest   424475058.
  4. "College Basketball Roundup Tar Heels Say Goodby With a 90-79 Win". Los Angeles Times (subscription required). January 5, 1986. p. C2. ProQuest   292258170.
  5. Powell, Adam (2005). University of North Carolina Basketball. ISBN   9780738541501.
  6. ESPN.com box score (UNC 80, W&M 72)

Bibliography