Reynolds Coliseum

Last updated
Reynolds Coliseum
Location103 Dunn Ave
North Carolina State Univ.
Raleigh, North Carolina
Coordinates 35°46′59″N78°40′12″W / 35.783°N 78.670°W / 35.783; -78.670 Coordinates: 35°46′59″N78°40′12″W / 35.783°N 78.670°W / 35.783; -78.670
Owner North Carolina State Univ.
OperatorNorth Carolina State Univ.
Capacity 14,000 Concerts [1]
12,400 Basketball, former
  5,600 Basketball, current
Construction
Broke ground1942
OpenedDecember 2, 1949
Renovated2015-2016
Construction cost $35 million
Tenants
North Carolina State Wolfpack (NCAA)
Men's Basketball (19491999),
Wolfpack Wrestling (1949-present),
Women's Basketball, Volleyball, Gymnastics
Army ROTC, Navy and Marine Corps ROTC,
Air Force ROTC

William Neal Reynolds Coliseum is a multi-purpose arena located in Raleigh, North Carolina, on the campus of North Carolina State University. The arena was built to host a variety of events, including agricultural expositions and NC State basketball games. It is now home to all services of ROTC and several Wolfpack teams, including women's basketball, women's volleyball, women's gymnastics, and men's wrestling. The university named the court in Reynolds "Kay Yow Court" on February 16, 2007 with the assistance of a substantial donation from the Wolfpack Club. [2] That same night, the Wolfpack women upset #2 North Carolina, just two weeks after the men upset #3 North Carolina at the PNC Arena.

Raleigh, North Carolina Capital of North Carolina

Raleigh is the capital of the state of North Carolina and the seat of Wake County in the United States. Raleigh is the second-largest city in the state, after Charlotte. Raleigh is known as the "City of Oaks" for its many oak trees, which line the streets in the heart of the city. The city covers a land area of 142.8 square miles (370 km2). The U.S. Census Bureau estimated the city's population as 469,298 as of July 1, 2018. It is one of the fastest-growing cities in the country. The city of Raleigh is named after Sir Walter Raleigh, who established the lost Roanoke Colony in present-day Dare County.

North Carolina State University public research university in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States

North Carolina State University is a public research university in Raleigh, North Carolina. It is part of the University of North Carolina system and is a land-, sea-, and space-grant institution. The university forms one of the corners of the Research Triangle together with Duke University in Durham and The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Basketball Team sport

Basketball is a team sport in which two teams, most commonly of five players each, opposing one another on a rectangular court, compete with the primary objective of shooting a basketball through the defender's hoop while preventing the opposing team from shooting through their own hoop. A field goal is worth two points, unless made from behind the three-point line, when it is worth three. After a foul, timed play stops and the player fouled or designated to shoot a technical foul is given one or more one-point free throws. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins, but if regulation play expires with the score tied, an additional period of play (overtime) is mandated.

Contents

History

NC State alumnus David Clark originally petitioned for the construction of the arena in 1940 after rain had ruined a North Carolina Farmers' Week meeting held in an outdoor facility. The North Carolina General Assembly approved plans for the coliseum. A steel shortage threatened to delay the construction of the coliseum. However, because the proposed coliseum was also to be used as an armory, the "steel for the structure received a defense priority." [3] Construction began in 1942. The foundation work and structural steel support system was completed by 1943 but construction was stopped due to US involvement in World War II. After the war the university was preoccupied with the building of housing and classroom facilities and the unfinished coliseum was left untouched until construction resumed in 1948. The arena was completed the following year and named in honor of William Neal Reynolds (18631951) of Winston-Salem. [1]

North Carolina General Assembly legislature of North Carolina

The North Carolina General Assembly is the bicameral legislature of the State government of North Carolina. The legislature consists of two chambers: the Senate and the House of Representatives. The General Assembly meets in the North Carolina Legislative Building in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the most populous city is New York City. Most of the country is located contiguously in North America between Canada and Mexico.

World War II 1939–1945 global war

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 70 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

The arena was originally intended to seat 10,000 people, but while the building was still under construction, newly hired head basketball coach Everett Case urged the administration to add an additional 2,400 seats, bringing capacity to 12,400. This was accomplished by expanding the structure at each end. It was the largest arena in the Southeast for many years.

Everett Case American basketball player and coach

Everett Norris Case, nicknamed "Gray Fox", was a basketball coach most notable for his tenure at North Carolina State University, from 1946 to 1964.

The first men's basketball game was played on December 2, 1949, against Washington & Lee University. NC State defeated Washington and Lee, 67-47. Not all the seats had been installed at that time and many fans had to sit on the "cement tiers." [4] The first women's basketball game was played on December 7, 1974. Men's basketball moved to the Raleigh Entertainment and Sports Arena in 1999. [5] The Wolfpack men have played a December regular-season "heritage" game at Reynolds Coliseum in recent years, and the arena hosted 2019 NIT first and second-round games against Hofstra and Harvard on March 19 and March 24.

Washington and Lee University United States national historic site

Washington and Lee University is a private liberal arts university in Lexington, Virginia. Established in 1749, the university is a colonial-era college and the ninth-oldest institution of higher learning in the United States.

PNC Arena Arena in Raleigh, North Carolina

PNC Arena is an indoor arena located in Raleigh, North Carolina. The arena seats 19,722 for basketball and 18,680 for ice hockey, including 59 suites, 13 loge boxes and 2,000 club seats. The building has three concourses and a 300-seat restaurant.

National Invitation Tournament second tier postseason college basketball tournament

The National Invitation Tournament (NIT) is a men's college basketball tournament operated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Played at regional sites and at Madison Square Garden in New York City each March and April, it was founded in 1938 and was originally the most prestigious post-season showcase for college basketball.

Reynolds was the original site of the ACC men's basketball tournament from 1954 to 1966, the Dixie Classic tournament from 1949 to 1960, and the Southern Conference men's basketball tournament (1951–1953). It has hosted the NCAA men's basketball tournament as a Regional site eight times, and as a subregional (first and second-round games) four times. It has also hosted the women's basketball tournament eleven times, only one of which was a regional site. The ACC Women's Basketball Tournament was held there twice, in 1979 and 1982. March 1982, in fact, was a very busy month for the arena: it hosted the ACC women's tournament, NCAA men's subregional, and NCAA women's regional all in succession.

Atlantic Coast Conference American collegiate athletics conference

The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic conference in the United States of America in which its fifteen member universities compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)'s Division I, with its football teams competing in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the highest levels for athletic competition in US-based collegiate sports. The ACC sponsors competition in twenty-five sports with many of its member institutions' athletic programs held in high regard nationally. Current members of the conference are Boston College, Clemson University, Duke University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Florida State University, North Carolina State University, Syracuse University, the University of Louisville, the University of Miami, the University of North Carolina, the University of Notre Dame, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Virginia, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and Wake Forest University.

Dixie Classic (basketball tournament)

The Dixie Classic was an annual college basketball tournament played from 1949 to 1960 in Reynolds Coliseum. The field consisted of the "Big Four" North Carolina schools, the host NC State Wolfpack, Duke Blue Devils, North Carolina Tar Heels, and Wake Forest Demon Deacons, and four teams from across the country.

Southern Conference sports league

The Southern Conference (SoCon) is a collegiate athletic conference affiliated with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I. Southern Conference football teams compete in the Football Championship Subdivision. Member institutions are located in the states of Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

It was considered to be one of the toughest places to play in the Atlantic Coast Conference. When ESPN asked contributors who played college basketball to identify the toughest arena they ever played in, Jay Bilas and Hubert Davis chose Reynolds. [6]

Jay Bilas American basketball player-coach

Jay Scot Bilas is an American college basketball analyst for ESPN, a former NCAA Tournament Announcer with CBS Sports, and also a former college basketball player.

Hubert Davis American basketball player

Hubert Ira Davis, Jr. is a retired American professional basketball player who played in the NBA. Davis's nearly 44.1% NBA career three-point shot percentage ranks him second only to Steve Kerr. He is the nephew of Walter Davis, another former NBA player. Davis later became a college basketball analyst for ESPN. He is currently an assistant coach at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, his alma mater.

Jay Bilas: "To me, the toughest places to play had more to do with the quality of the opposing team than anything else, but Reynolds Coliseum at NC State was the toughest place I played while in college. Reynolds was configured much the same way as Cameron Indoor Stadium, but the end zones were much deeper and the sides were right on top of you. Reynolds was loud, edgy and intense. The Wolfpack under Jim Valvano were a tough out and the games were always fistfights, but the thing I remember most is coming back to a huddle and seeing lips move, but not being able to hear what was said. It was so hot and loud that your head would spin. Of course, having to guard guys like Thurl Bailey, Lorenzo Charles, Cozell McQueen and Chris Washburn probably had something to do with my head spinning."

Hubert Davis: "The toughest place I ever played was Reynolds Coliseum, former home of the NC State Wolfpack. Cameron Indoor Stadium and Cole Field House don't even come close. I remember the long walk from the locker room to the floor. You had to enter under the bleachers and then had to sprint to the floor so that the fans wouldn't throw soda on us. The end zone seating went back as far as I've ever seen – the sea of red just never seemed to end. In the four years I played there as a Tar Heel, I never scored on the opposite basket away from our bench in the first half. I eventually calmed down, but was always flustered in those first 20 minutes. It was that intimidating."

In May 2005, the arena was damaged by a small fire. Damage was minimal, and crews quickly repaired the structure. [7]

Renovations were completed in 2005 that added new lighting, a new sound system, and new separate floors for basketball and volleyball. The new sound system proved to be inadequate, and was reworked in 2008. Because of the unusually long floor area, the volleyball court was able to fit in the north end of the coliseum perpendicular to the basketball court. The basketball area of the coliseum was curtained off or blocked off with temporary bleachers during volleyball matches. During basketball games temporary bleachers were rolled out over the volleyball floor, as well as over the open area on the south end of the court.

The look of the court before renovation. Reynolds Coliseum.jpg
The look of the court before renovation.

The arena was closed in March 2015 for extensive remodeling, which cost an estimated $35 million. The project moved the competition floor to the south end of the arena while lowering the seating capacity to 5,500 (it can be a bit higher for festival events). The north end of the building features a new Walk of Fame and History, including a permanent home for the NC State Athletic Hall of Fame, as well as offices for women's basketball and volleyball. Restrooms, concessions and hospitality areas were renovated and concourses were widened. A new video control room for all sports was added. And for the first time, the entire arena is air-conditioned. [8]

NC State's volleyball team was the first to play at home in the newly renovated Reynolds on September 9, 2016, defeating Delaware 3-0.

Men's Basketball At Reynolds Coliseum
Southern Conference Champions1949 • 1950 • 1951 • 1952
ACC Champions1954 • 1955 • 1956 • 1959 • 1965 • 1970 • 1973 • 1974 • 1983 • 1987
NCAA Titles1974 • 1983
Women's Basketball
ACC Regular Season Champions1978 • 1980 • 1983 • 1985 • 1990
ACC Tournament Champions1980 • 1985 • 1987 • 1991

Configuration

The building's arena floor measures 108 x 312 feet. Originally, it seated 12,400 for basketball and 14,000 for concerts. Besides the building's long dimensions, another recognizable feature of the building is the floor-level bleacher seating, which is noticeably separate from the arena's main seating sections, a feature copied in the building of the PNC Arena. The building's exterior dimensions are 180 x 371 feet.

Reynolds Coliseum Reynold's Coliseum.jpg
Reynolds Coliseum

PA Announcer

C. A. Dillon was the Public Address Announcer for the men's basketball games (including games of the Southern Conference, ACC, Dixie Classic and NCAA basketball tournaments) during the entire 50-year run of men's basketball in the arena. Bob Ferrone started as the PA Announcer for women’s basketball in 1975, the same year Kay Yow began her award-winning 34-year career as coach of the Wolfpack Women. He continued, assisted by his wife Jan, for 27 years rarely missing a game at Reynolds Coliseum.

Currently, women's basketball is announced by Ed Funkhouser. For eleven years, volleyball was announced by Vance Elderkin.

Special Events

The arena hosted games for the Carolina Cougars of the American Basketball Association during some but not all of their time in North Carolina from 1969 through 1974.

The arena also hosts annual N.C. State homecoming events, particularly concerts, featuring artists such as Def Leppard, Van Halen, Lonestar, Chris Daughtry, Ludacris [9] & Crossfade, and hip hop artist T.I. [10] , among others. It also played host to many Raleigh area high school graduation ceremonies, though most now take place at the Raleigh Convention Center.

Historically, Reynolds served as the host for many campus concerts and special events. Elton John, The Rolling Stones, Louis Armstrong, Loverboy, Logan Paul, The Kingston Trio and Huey Lewis & The News have all performed in Reynolds. Additionally, former presidents Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, and Barack Obama have addressed students, faculty, and campus visitors in the coliseum. [11]

On February 24, 2015, Phish released a live recording of their 12/16/99 concert from Reynolds Coliseum on LivePhish.com. [12]

On March 10, 2018, Reynolds Coliseum hosted the NCHSAA 3A Men’s Basketball Championship. The game saw the Cox Mill Chargers men’s basketball team take home their second straight State Championship.[ citation needed ]

See also

Related Research Articles

Tobacco Road is a term used in college sports, mainly basketball, for four rival universities in North Carolina that play in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The term refers to the area's history as a major tobacco producer. The Tobacco Road teams represent the following universities:

NC State Wolfpack intercollegiate sports teams of North Carolina State University

The NC State Wolfpack is the nickname of the athletic teams representing North Carolina State University. The Wolfpack competes at the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) for all sports since the 1953–54 season. The athletic teams of the Wolfpack compete in 23 intercollegiate varsity sports. NC State is a founding member of the ACC and has won eight national championships: two NCAA championships, two AIAW championships, and four titles under other sanctioning bodies. Most NC State fans and athletes recognize the rivalry with the North Carolina Tar Heels as their biggest.

NC State Wolfpack mens basketball NCAA Division 1 Basketball Program

The NC State Wolfpack men's basketball team represents North Carolina State University in NCAA Division I men's basketball competition. The Wolfpack currently competes in the Atlantic Coast Conference, of which it was a founding member. Prior to joining the ACC in 1954, the Wolfpack was a member of the Southern Conference, where they won seven conference championships. As a member of the ACC, the Wolfpack has won ten conference championships, as well as two national championships in 1974 and 1983. State's unexpected 1983 title was one of the most memorable in NCAA history.

The ACC Men's Basketball Tournament is the conference championship tournament in basketball for the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The tournament has been held every year since 1954, the ACC's first season. It is a single-elimination tournament and seeding is based on regular season records. The winner, declared conference champion, receives the conference's automatic bid to the NCAA men's basketball tournament.

Thompson Gym, built in 1925, was the indoor arena of North Carolina State University until Reynolds Coliseum opened in 1949. The facility hosted mainly basketball games, including the Southern Conference men's basketball tournament from 1933 to 1946. Reynolds Coliseum has since been replaced by PNC Arena.

2009–10 NC State Wolfpack womens basketball team

The 2009–10 NC State Wolfpack women's basketball team represents North Carolina State University in the 2009–10 women's college basketball season. The team is coached by Kellie Harper and plays its home games in Reynolds Coliseum in Raleigh, NC. The Wolfpack is a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

NC State Wolfpack womens basketball womens college basketball team

The NC State Wolfpack women's basketball team is one of the most storied programs in women's college basketball history.

The 2012–13 NC State Wolfpack men's basketball team represented North Carolina State University in the 2012–13 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The team's head coach was Mark Gottfried in his second season. The team played their home games at PNC Arena in Raleigh, North Carolina, as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They finished the season 24–11, 11–7 in ACC play to finish in a tie for fourth place. They advanced to the semifinals of the ACC Tournament where they lost to Miami (FL). They received an at-large bid to the 2013 NCAA Tournament where they lost in the second round to Temple.

The 2014–15 NC State Wolfpack women's basketball team represents North Carolina State University during the 2014–15 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. The Wolfpack, led by second-year head coach Wes Moore, play their home games at Reynolds Coliseum and were members of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They finished the season 18–15, 7–9 in ACC play to finish in a three way tie for ninth place. They lost in the first round of the ACC Women's Tournament to Virginia Tech. They were invited to the Women's National Invitation Tournament which they defeated East Tennessee State in the first round, East Carolina in the second round before falling to Temple in the third round.

The 2015–16 NC State Wolfpack women's basketball team represents North Carolina State University during the 2015–16 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. The Wolfpack, led by third-year head coach Wes Moore, play their home games at Needham B. Broughton High School with 2 games at PNC Arena due to renovations at Reynolds Coliseum and were members of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They finished the season 20–11, 10–6 in ACC play to finish in sixth place. They advanced to the quarterfinals of the ACC Women's Tournament to Syracuse. Despite having 20 wins, they were not invited to a postseason tournament.

The 2016–17 NC State Wolfpack women's basketball team represents North Carolina State University during the 2016–17 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. The Wolfpack, led by fourth-year head coach Wes Moore, return to play their home games at Reynolds Coliseum after a one year of renovation and were members of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They finished the season 23–9, 12–4 in ACC play to finish in a tie for fourth place. They lost in the quarterfinals of the ACC Women's Tournament to Louisville. They received at-large bid of the NCAA Women's Tournament where they defeated Auburn in the first round before losing to Texas in the second round.

The 2016–17 NC State Wolfpack men's basketball team represented North Carolina State University during the 2016–17 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Wolfpack, led by sixth-year head coach Mark Gottfried, played its home games at PNC Arena in Raleigh, North Carolina and were members of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). They finished the season 15–17, 4-14 in ACC play to finish in a tie for 13th place. They lost in the first round of the ACC Tournament to Clemson.

The 2017–18 NC State Wolfpack men's basketball team represented North Carolina State University during the 2017–18 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Wolfpack, led by first-year head coach Kevin Keatts, played its home games at PNC Arena in Raleigh, North Carolina and were members of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). They finished the season 21–12, 11–7 in ACC play to finish in a tie for third place. They lost in the second round of the ACC Tournament to Boston College. They received an at-large bid to the NCAA Tournament where they lost in the first round to Seton Hall.

NC State–Wake Forest rivalry

The NC State–Wake Forest rivalry is a series of athletic contests between in-state rivals, the North Carolina State University Wolfpack and the Wake Forest University Demon Deacons. The first game was played in 1895 between the two institutions. Wake Forest was originally located in Wake Forest, North Carolina until it moved its campus across the state of North Carolina to Winston-Salem, North Carolina in 1956. The two universities are members of the Atlantic Coast Conference, where they meet every year in football due to being aligned in the Atlantic Division. The schools play each other twice in basketball every season, due to being primary partners.

The 2017–18 NC State Wolfpack women's basketball team represented North Carolina State University during the 2017–18 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. The Wolfpack, led by fifth-year head coach Wes Moore, played their home games at Reynolds Coliseum and were members of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They finished the season 26–9, 11–5 in ACC play to finish in a tie for fourth place. They advanced to the semifinals of the ACC Women's Tournament where they lost to Louisville. They received at-large bid of the NCAA Women's Tournament where they defeated Elon and Maryland in the first and second rounds before losing to Mississippi State in the sweet sixteen.

The 2018–19 NC State Wolfpack men's basketball team represented North Carolina State University during the 2018–19 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Wolfpack, led by second-year head coach Kevin Keatts, played its home games at PNC Arena in Raleigh, North Carolina and were members of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). They finished the season 24–12, 9–9 in ACC play to finish in a tie for eighth place. They lost in the quarterfinals of the ACC Tournament to Virginia. They received a bid to the NIT where they lost in the quarterfinals to Lipscomb.

The 2018–19 NC State Wolfpack women's basketball team represents North Carolina State University during the 2018–19 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. The Wolfpack, led by sixth-year head coach Wes Moore, play their home games at Reynolds Coliseum and were members of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They finished the season 28–6, 11–5 in ACC play to finish in a tie for third place. They advanced to the semifinals of the ACC Women's Tournament where they lost to Louisville. They received at-large bid of the NCAA Women's Tournament where they defeated Maine and Kentucky in the first and second rounds to advance to the sweet sixteen for the 2nd straight year where they lost to Iowa.

The 2019–20 NC State Wolfpack men's basketball team represented North Carolina State University during the 2019–20 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Wolfpack, led by third-year head coach Kevin Keatts, played its home games at PNC Arena in Raleigh, North Carolina and were members of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC).

References

  1. 1 2 "William Neal Reynolds Coliseum".
  2. Technician. NCSU Special Collections, Raleigh, NC. North Carolina State University. 21 February 2007.Missing or empty |title= (help)
  3. Technician. NCSU Libraries Special Collections Research Center. North Carolina State University. 19 September 1941 http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/specialcollections/.Missing or empty |title= (help)
  4. Historical State: History in Red and White. "Reynolds Coliseum opens (12/2/1949)" . Retrieved 23 December 2011.
  5. Caraviello, David (February 6, 1999). "N.C. State arena outdated, but not undadored". Herald-Journal. (Spartanburg, SC). p. C1.
  6. http://espn.go.com/blog/collegebasketballnation/post/_/id/34998/the-toughest-arena-i-ever-played-in
  7. http://www.wral.com/news/local/story/117307/
  8. http://www.gopack.com/facilities/athletics-facility-enhancements.html
  9. "Chair warns this year's homecoming act may not impress". Technician. 23 September 2009. Retrieved 11 January 2012.
  10. https://seatnerds.com/things-to-do-in-raleigh-north-carolina/reynolds-coliseum/
  11. Historical State: History in Red and White. "Campus Visitors Timeline" . Retrieved 23 December 2011.
  12. http://www.livephish.com/browse/music/0,936/Phish-12-16-1999-Raleigh