Duke Blue Devils baseball

Last updated
Duke Blue Devils baseball
Duke Athletics logo.svg
Founded1903
University Duke University
Head coach Chris Pollard (8th season)
Conference ACC
Coastal Division
Location Durham, North Carolina
Home stadium Durham Bulls Athletic Park
(Capacity: 10,000)
Nickname Blue Devils
ColorsDuke Blue and White [1]
         
College World Series appearances
1952, 1953, 1961
NCAA regional champions
2018, 2019
NCAA Tournament appearances
1952, 1953, 1956, 1957, 1961, 2016, 2018, 2019
Conference tournament champions
Southern Conference: 1951
Conference champions
SIAA: 1904
Southern Conference: 1929, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1951, 1952, 1953
Atlantic Coast Conference: 1956, 1957, 1961

The Duke Blue Devils baseball team is the varsity intercollegiate baseball program of Duke University, based in Durham, North Carolina, United States. The team has been a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference since the conference's founding in the 1954 season. The program's home venue is the Durham Bulls Athletic Park, which opened in 1995. Chris Pollard has been the head coach of the team since the 2013 season. As of the end of the 2019 season, the Blue Devils have appeared in three College World Series in six NCAA Tournaments. They have won three ACC Championships. As of the start of the 2019 Major League Baseball season, 36 former Blue Devils players have played in Major League Baseball.

Contents

History

The baseball program began varsity play in 1889. [2] Led by Arthur Bradsher's 13–1 record they won the S.I.A.A. championship in 1904. The Trinity hurler struck out 169 batters during that championship season and walked only four batters the entire season.

The vast majority of the program's successes came under head coaches Jack Coombs and Ace Parker from 1929–1966. Coombs led the Blue Devils to five Southern Conference championships and to a fifth-place finish in the 1952 College World Series. [2] Taking over upon Coombs' retirement after the 1952 season, Parker led Duke to the 1953 and 1961 College World Series, one Southern Conference championship, and three Atlantic Coast Conference championships. [2] In 2016, Duke earned their first bid to the NCAA Tournament since their 1961 College World Series run, ending a 55-year drought. Head coach Chris Pollard continued this success, leading the Blue Devils to the NCAA Super Regionals in 2018 and 2019.

Steroid controversy

In 2005, the program was the target of a controversy involving the use of anabolic steroids. [3] Five former players told the Duke Chronicle that head coach Bill Hillier had pressured players to use steroids, with two of those players admitting to having injected steroids in 2002. [3] In an open letter published in the Chronicle, another former player, Evan Anderson, confirmed that Hillier had pressured players to use steroids. [4] While Hillier denied the accusations, he was replaced as head coach after the 2005 season. [3]

Conference affiliations

Head coaches

Year(s)CoachSeasonsW–L–TPct
1901Mr. Schock16–5.545
1902–1907 Otis Stocksdale 676–37–4.650
1908–1914M.T. Adkins7104–67–4.594
1915–1916Claude West214–26–3.326
1917Heine Manush14–6–1.364
1919 Lee Gooch 119–4–2.760
1920 Chick Doak 110–9..526
1921Pat Egan110–8–1.526
1922 Herman G. Steiner 112–6.667
1923–1924 Howard Jones 231–8.795
1925Bill Towe19–9.500
1926–1928G.B. Whitted328–29–1.483
1929–1952 Jack Coombs 24381–171–3.686
1953–1966 Ace Parker 14166–162–4.500
1966–1967James Bly215–34.306
1968–1970 Tom Butters 343–53–1.443
1971–1977 Enos Slaughter 768–120.362
1978–1984Tom D'Armi7125–98–2.556
1985–1987Larry Smith361–58–4.496
1988–1999 Steve Traylor 12356–286–1.554
2000–2005Bill Hillier6121–214.361
2006–2012Sean McNally7192–198–1.492
2013–present Chris Pollard 259–55.518
Totals1,895–1,622–34.534

Year by year record

SeasonCoachRecordNotes
OverallConference
1889Unknown0–0–1
18900–1
1891No Team
1892No Team
1893No Team
1894No Team
1895No Team
1896Unknown7–1
18977–3
18984–4–1
189911–6
19008–4
1901Mr. Schock6–5
1902 Otis Stocksdale 12–8
19039–5–1
190414–3–2—S.I.A.A champions
190514–6–1
19068–7
190719–8
1908M. T. Adkins17–3–1
190918–7
191016–10–3
191116–9
191211–13
191315–13
191410–11
1915Claude West8–9–1
19166–17–1
1917Heine Manush4–6–1
1918No Team Due To World War I
1919 Lee Gooch 19–4–2
1920 Chick Doak 10–9
1921Pat Egan10–8–1
1922 Herman G. Steiner 12–6
1923 Howard Jones 17–4
192414–4
1925Bill Towe9–9
1926G.B. Whitted7–12
19278–10
192813–7–1
Southern Conference
1929 Jack Coombs 13–5
193017–5State Champions
193111–4State Champions
193215–7
193312–7
193420–4
193524–3
193618–7
193722–2Southern Conference Champions, State Champions
193818–3Southern Conference Champions, State Champions
193922–2Southern Conference Champions, State Champions
194016–7
194114–11
194215–7
19438–4
19449–7
19459–7
194615–8Big Four Champions
194718–10Big Four Champions, State Champions
194815–12
194912–17–1
195011–18
195117–8Southern Conference Champions, Southern Conference Tournament Champions, Co-Big Four Champions
195231–7Southern Conference Champions, College World Series (5th place)
1953 Ace Parker 22–10Southern Conference Champions, College World Series (5th place)
Atlantic Coast Conference
1954 Ace Parker 10–135–9
195510–116–6
195616–12–212–3–1ACC Champions
195719–810–4ACC Champions
19589–117–5
19599–165–10
196013–8–19–4–1
196116–1111–3ACC Champions, College World Series (5th place)
196213–12–16–8
196315–108–6
19644–210–12
19658–175–9
1966 Ace Parker/James Bly13–129–9
1967James Bly9–202–12
1968 Tom Butters 12–197–13
196912–18–17–13
197017–1610–11
1971 Enos Slaughter 15–144–10
197212–163–7
19737–172–10
19749–163–8
19759–182–10
19767–231–11
19779–161–7
1978Tom D'Armi12–211–10
197912–181–11
198017–112–9
198129–106–6
198216–13–13–7
198314–12–11–8–1
198425–133–8
1985Larry Smith18–15–35–8–1
198625–172–12
198718–26–13–14
1988 Steve Traylor 10–353–16
198920–232–14
199028–254–15
199124–276–15
199238–1612–12
199339–19–111–13
199433–2016–8
199530–274–20
199639–1911–13
199733–259–14
199838–208–15
199924–314–18
2000Bil Hillier17–415–19
200123–3310–13
200224–344–20
200318–362–21
200425–318–16
200514–395–25
2006Sean McNally15–406–24
200729–258–22
200837–18–110–18–1
200935–2415–15
201029–278–22
201126–307–23
201221–349–21
2013 Chris Pollard 26–299–21
201433–2516–14
201531–2210–19
201633–2414–15 NCAA Regional
201730–2812–18
201840–1518–11 NCAA Super Regional
201935–2715–15 NCAA Super Regional

NCAA Tournament record

YearRecordPctNotes
19521–2.333 College World Series (6th place)
19531–2.333 College World Series (6th place)
19563–3.500 District 3
19573–2.600 District 3
19613–2.600 College World Series (6th place)
20160–2.000 Columbia Regional
20185–3.625 Lubbock Super Regional
20194-2.667 Nashville Super Regional

Current and former major league players [5]

Nate Freiman Nate Freiman on August 23, 2013.jpg
Nate Freiman
Dick Groat Dick Groat 1960.png
Dick Groat
Scott Schoeneweis ScottSchoeneweis.jpg
Scott Schoeneweis

See also

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References

  1. "Duke Athletics Quick Facts". GoDuke.com. September 5, 2019. Retrieved November 26, 2019.
  2. 1 2 3 "2013 Media Guide" (PDF). GoDuke.com. Retrieved 7 June 2013.
  3. 1 2 3 "STEROID CHARGES ROCK DUKE BASEBALL". Duke Chronicle. 14 April 2005. Retrieved 7 June 2013.
  4. Anderson, Evan (18 April 2005). "Steroid allegations are accurate". Duke Chronicle. Retrieved 7 June 2013.
  5. https://www.baseball-reference.com/schools/index.cgi?key_school=ab7868a7