Debbie Keller

Last updated
Debbie Keller
Dkeller95.jpg
Personal information
Full nameDeborah Kim Keller
Date of birth (1975-03-24) March 24, 1975 (age 43)
Place of birth Winfield, Illinois, United States
Height 5 ft 4 in (1.63 m)
College career
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1993–96 North Carolina Tar Heels
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1997 Rockford Dactyls
1999 Fortuna Hjørring
2000 Rockford Dactyls
National team
1995–99 United States 47 (19)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league onlyand correct as of November 9, 2013
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of November 9, 2013

Deborah "Debbie" Kim Keller (born March 24, 1975) is an American retired soccer forward and former member of the United States women's national soccer team.

United States womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing the United States

The United States Women's National Soccer Team (USWNT) represents the United States in international women's soccer. The team is the most successful in international women's soccer, winning three Women's World Cup titles, four Olympic women's gold medals, eight CONCACAF Gold Cups, and ten Algarve Cups. It medaled in every single World Cup and Olympic tournament in women's soccer history from 1991 to 2015, before being knocked out in the quarterfinal of the 2016 Summer Olympics. The team is governed by United States Soccer Federation and competes in CONCACAF.

Contents

Early life

Born in Winfield, Illinois, Keller was raised in Naperville where she attended Waubonsie Valley High School and played for the women's soccer team where her mother was the head coach. Throughout her high school career, Keller scored 144 goals and served 92 assists. She was named a Parade All-American twice and was named to the Chicago Tribune Top 20 Scholar-Athlete Team. [1]

Winfield, Illinois Village in Illinois, United States

Winfield is an incorporated village located in Milton and Winfield Townships, DuPage County, Illinois, United States. The population was 8,718 at the 2000 census and as of 2016 the population was 9,492.

Naperville, Illinois City in Illinois, United States

Naperville is a city in DuPage and Will counties in the U.S. state of Illinois. Located 28 miles (45 km) west of Chicago, Naperville was founded in 1831 and developed into the fifth-largest city in Illinois. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 141,853, which was estimated to have increased to 147,682 by 2017.

Waubonsie Valley High School Public secondary school in Aurora, Illinois

Waubonsie Valley High School, or WVHS, is a public four-year high school at the corner of Ogden Avenue and Eola Road in Aurora, Illinois, a western suburb of Chicago, Illinois, in the United States. Other high schools in Indian Prairie School District 204 are Neuqua Valley High School, Metea Valley High School, and Indian Plains Alternative High School.

North Carolina Tar Heels

Keller attended University of North Carolina from 1993 to 1996 where she played for the Tar Heels led by national team coach, Anson Dorrance. [2] During her junior season, she scored 23 goals and served 14 assists in the 26 games she played. [1] Five of her goals came during Tar Heels' 8–0 defeat of North Carolina State University. [3] The following year, she scored 18 goals and served 16 assists in 22 games. [1]

University of North Carolina public university system throughout North Carolina, USA

The University of North Carolina is a multi-campus public university system composed of all 16 of North Carolina's public universities, as well as the NC School of Science and Mathematics, the nation's first public residential high school for gifted students. Commonly referred to as the University of North Carolina System or the UNC System to differentiate it from the original campus in Chapel Hill, the university has a total enrollment of over 183,001 students and in 2008 conferred over 75% of all baccalaureate degrees in North Carolina. UNC campuses conferred 43,686 degrees in 2008–2009, the bulk of which were at the bachelor's level, with 31,055 degrees awarded.

North Carolina Tar Heels intercollegiate sports teams of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The North Carolina Tar Heels are the athletic teams representing the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The name Tar Heel is a nickname used to refer to individuals from the state of North Carolina, the Tar Heel State. The campus at Chapel Hill is referred to as the University of North Carolina for the purposes of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was chartered in 1789, and in 1795 it became the first state-supported university in the United States. Since the school fostered the oldest collegiate team in the Carolinas, the school took on the nickname ""Carolina", especially in athletics. The Tar Heels are also referred to as North Carolina, UNC, or The Heels. The female athletic teams are sometimes referred to as Lady Tar Heels.

Anson Dorrance American soccer player-coach

Albert Anson Dorrance IV is an American soccer coach. He is currently the head coach of the women's soccer program at the University of North Carolina. He has one of the most successful coaching records in the history of athletics. Under Dorrance's leadership, the Tar Heels have won 21 of the 31 NCAA Women's Soccer Championships. The Tar Heels' record under Dorrance stood at 809-67-36 over 33 seasons at the end of the 2017 season. He has led his team to a 101-game unbeaten streak and coached 13 different women to a total of 20 National Player of the Year awards. The NCAA has recognized Dorrance as the Women's Soccer Coach of the Year seven times and as the Men's Soccer Coach of the Year in 1987. On March 10, 2008 Dorrance was elected to the National Soccer Hall of Fame.

In 1998, Keller and her Tar Heel teammate Melissa Jennings filed a sexual harassment lawsuit against Dorrance that ended ten years later in a settlement. [4] [5]

Playing career

Club

In March 1999 Keller signed for Danish Elitedivisionen team Fortuna Hjørring, scoring on her debut on 1 April 1999. [6] She received a letter of intent from Women's United Soccer Association, but did not join the new league because of Dorrance's involvement in it. [7]

Elitedivisionen is the highest-level league competition for women's football clubs in Danish football. The first national championship was contested in 1973. The current name Elitedivisionen was established in 1994.

Fortuna Hjørring womens association football team

Fortuna Hjørring is a women's association football team from Hjørring, Denmark. The club was formed in 1966 and play in green and white. Their biggest achievement in European football was reaching the 2002–03 UEFA Women's Cup final where they ultimately lost 1–7 on aggregate to Umeå IK.

Letter of intent document outlining one or more agreements between two or more parties before the agreements are finalized

A letter of intent is a document outlining the understanding between two or more parties which understanding they intend to formalize in a legally binding agreement. The concept is similar to a heads of agreement, term sheet or memorandum of understanding. Such outlined agreements may be merger and acquisition transaction agreements, joint venture agreements, real property lease agreements and several other categories of agreements that may govern material transactions.

International

Keller played for the United States women's national soccer team from 1995 to 1999. In 1998, her 14 goals ranked third on the team behind Mia Hamm and Tiffeny Milbrett. [8] She was cut from the team before the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup and unsuccessfully took legal action to be reinstated, suggesting her exclusion by coach Tony DiCicco had been a retaliation for the Dorrance lawsuit. [9]

Mia Hamm American association football player

Mariel Margaret Hamm-Garciaparra is an American retired professional soccer player, two-time Olympic gold medalist, and two-time FIFA Women's World Cup champion. Hailed as a soccer icon, she played as a forward for the United States women's national soccer team from 1987–2004. Hamm was the face of the Women's United Soccer Association (WUSA), the first professional women's soccer league in the United States, where she played for the Washington Freedom from 2001–2003. She played college soccer for the North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer team and helped the team win four consecutive NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Championship titles.

Tiffeny Milbrett American soccer player

Tiffeny Carleen Milbrett is an American retired professional soccer forward who was a longtime member of the United States women's national soccer team. In May 2018 the National Soccer Hall of Fame announced Milbrett will be enshrined in the Hall. A native of Oregon, she starred at the University of Portland where she scored a then school record 103 goals during her career. She won an Olympic gold medal in 1996 in Atlanta and a silver medal at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney. She also played in three World Cups, winning in 1999. A player who enjoys signing autographs for her fans, she is in the top five all-time in the United States national soccer team in three offensive categories.

1999 FIFA Womens World Cup 1999 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup, the third edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in the United States and won by the host team. The final between the U.S. and China, held on 10 July at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California, was the most-attended women's sports event in history with an official attendance of 90,185. U.S. President Bill Clinton was among those in attendance. The final was scoreless after extra time and won by the U.S. in a penalty shootout. This remains the only Women's World Cup tournament in which the host nation has won.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Debbie Keller". Soccer Times. Retrieved 9 November 2013.
  2. DeSimone, Bonnie (June 15, 2003). "Outcast with a cause". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 10 November 2013.
  3. "Tarpley Scores Four Goals As Carolina Blanks Wake Forest". University of North Carolina. October 14, 2003. Retrieved 10 November 2013.
  4. "Dorrance, former player settle sexual harassment suit". USA Today. January 14, 2008. Retrieved 10 November 2013.
  5. "Is different approach needed?". Sports Illustrated. November 23, 1998. Retrieved 10 November 2013.
  6. Wahl, Grant (April 19, 1999). "Soccer". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 4 January 2014.
  7. French, Scott (May 8, 2000). "Four players, four views" (PDF). Soccer America. Retrieved 4 January 2014.
  8. Jones, Grahame L. (March 1, 1999). "Keller Is a Star on the Outside Looking in". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 10 November 2013.
  9. Longman, Jere (May 11, 1999). "Keller Loses Bid to Return to U.S. Women's Team". New York Times. Retrieved 10 November 2013.

Further reading