Anson Dorrance

Last updated
Anson Dorrance
Anson Dorrance.jpg
Dorrance during the final of the 2006 Women's College Cup
Current position
TitleHead coach
Team North Carolina
Conference ACC
Record809-67-36 (.907)
Biographical details
Born (1951-04-09) April 9, 1951 (age 67)
Flag of India.svg Bombay, India
Playing career
1970–1974 North Carolina
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1979–present North Carolina women
1976–1988 North Carolina men
1986–1994 U.S. women
Head coaching record
Overall981-132-28
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
21x NCAA Division I Tournament Championship (1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2012)
21x ACC Tournament Championship (1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2017)
21x ACC Regular Season Championship (1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2014, 2017)
Women's World Cup (1991)
Awards
8x National Coach of the Year (1982, 1986, 1987, 1997, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2006)
10x ACC Coach of the Year (1982, 1986, 1987, 1997, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2008)

Albert Anson Dorrance IV [1] (born April 9, 1951) is an American soccer coach. He is currently the head coach of the women's soccer program at the University of North Carolina. He has one of the most successful coaching records in the history of athletics. Under Dorrance's leadership, the Tar Heels have won 21 of the 31 NCAA Women's Soccer Championships. The Tar Heels' record under Dorrance stood at 809-67-36 (.907 winning percentage) over 33 seasons at the end of the 2017 season. He has led his team to a 101-game unbeaten streak and coached 13 different women to a total of 20 National Player of the Year awards. The NCAA has recognized Dorrance as the Women's Soccer Coach of the Year seven times (1982, 1986, 1997, 2000, 2001, 2003 and 2006) and as the Men's Soccer Coach of the Year in 1987. On March 10, 2008 Dorrance was elected to the National Soccer Hall of Fame. [2]

Coach (sport) person involved in directing, instructing and training sportspeople

In sports, a coach is a person involved in the direction, instruction and training of the operations of a sports team or of individual sportspeople. A coach may also be a teacher.

North Carolina Tar Heels womens soccer

The North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer team represent the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the Atlantic Coast Conference of NCAA Division I soccer. The team has won 20 of the 27 Atlantic Coast Conference championships, and 22 of the 36 NCAA national championships.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill public research university in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), also known as UNC-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, or simply Carolina is a public research university in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. It is the flagship of the 17 campuses of the University of North Carolina system. After being chartered in 1789, the university first began enrolling students in 1795, which also allows it to be one of three schools to claim the title of the oldest public university in the United States. Among the claimants, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the only one to have held classes and graduated students as a public university in the eighteenth century.

Contents

Early life

Dorrance was born in Bombay, India on April 9, 1951, the son of an American oil executive. He spent his youth moving with his family throughout Europe and Africa. Of all the places he lived, three had particular influences on his later life. In Addis Ababa, Ethiopia he met his future wife, M'Liss Gary, the daughter of the U.S. Air Force attache to Ethiopia. He attributes his love of soccer to his years living in Kenya and finally, he gained his education from the boarding school, Villa St. Jean International School, in Fribourg, Switzerland from which he graduated in 1969.

India Country in South Asia

India, also known as the Republic of India, is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh largest country by area and with more than 1.3 billion people, it is the second most populous country as well as the most populous democracy in the world. Bounded by the Indian Ocean on the south, the Arabian Sea on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal on the southeast, it shares land borders with Pakistan to the west; China, Nepal, and Bhutan to the northeast; and Bangladesh and Myanmar to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka and the Maldives, while its Andaman and Nicobar Islands share a maritime border with Thailand and Indonesia.

Addis Ababa Capital in Ethiopia

Addis Ababa is the capital and largest city of Ethiopia. According to the 2007 census, the city has a population of 2,739,551 inhabitants.

Ethiopia country in East Africa

Ethiopia, officially the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, is a country in the northeastern part of Africa, popularly known as the Horn of Africa. It shares borders with Eritrea to the north, Djibouti to the northeast, and Somalia to the east, Sudan and South Sudan to the west, and Kenya to the south. With over 102 million inhabitants, Ethiopia is the most populous landlocked country in the world and the second-most populous nation on the African continent that covers a total area of 1,100,000 square kilometres (420,000 sq mi). Its capital and largest city is Addis Ababa, which lies a few miles west of the East African Rift that splits the country into the Nubian Plate and the Somali Plate.

After graduating from Villa St. Jean, he moved to the United States and attended St Mary's University in San Antonio, Texas. He transferred after the fall term to the University of North Carolina. His love of soccer led him to walk onto the school's soccer team, then coached by Marvin Allen, where he was a three time All-ACC player. In 1974, he graduated with a B.A. in English and Philosophy. That year he also married his childhood sweetheart, M'Liss Gary.

San Antonio City in Texas, United States

San Antonio, officially the City of San Antonio, is the seventh-most populous city in the United States, and the second-most populous city in both Texas and the Southern United States, with more than 1.5 million residents. Founded as a Spanish mission and colonial outpost in 1718, the city became the first chartered civil settlement in present-day Texas in 1731. The area was still part of the Spanish Empire, and later of the Mexican Republic. Today it is the state's oldest municipality.

Texas State of the United States of America

Texas is the second largest state in the United States by both area and population. Geographically located in the South Central region of the country, Texas shares borders with the U.S. states of Louisiana to the east, Arkansas to the northeast, Oklahoma to the north, New Mexico to the west, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas to the southwest, while the Gulf of Mexico is to the southeast.

A Bachelor of Arts is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, sciences, or both. Bachelor of Arts programs generally take three to four years depending on the country, institution, and specific specializations, majors, or minors. The word baccalaureus should not be confused with baccalaureatus, which refers to the one- to two-year postgraduate Bachelor of Arts with Honors degree in some countries.

Under the influence of his father, Dorrance entered North Carolina Central University Law School in 1976, later transferring to the University of North Carolina School of Law. That same year, Coach Allen convinced Dorrance to succeed him as the UNC men's soccer coach. From 1977 until 1988 Dorrance compiled a 175–65–21 (.708) record with the team. His greatest success with the men's team came in 1987 when he led them to the Atlantic Coast Conference championship and the NCAA Final Four. That same year he also won the NCAA Men's Soccer Coach of the Year. [3]

North Carolina Central University university

North Carolina Central University (NCCU), also known as simply Central, is a public, historically black university in Durham, North Carolina. Founded by James E. Shepard in affiliation with the Chautauqua movement in 1909, it was supported by private funds from both Northern and Southern philanthropists. It was made part of the state system in 1923, when it first received state funding and was renamed as Durham State Normal School. It added graduate classes in arts and sciences, and professional schools in law and library science in the late 1930s and 1940s.

University of North Carolina School of Law law school

The University of North Carolina School of Law is a professional school within the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Established in 1845, Carolina Law is among the oldest law schools in the nation and is the oldest law school in North Carolina. It is consistently ranked in the top-tier of law schools.

Atlantic Coast Conference American collegiate athletics conference

The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic conference in the United States of America in which its fifteen member universities compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)'s Division I, with its football teams competing in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the highest levels for athletic competition in US-based collegiate sports. The ACC sponsors competition in twenty-five sports with many of its member institutions' athletic programs held in high regard nationally. Current members of the conference are Boston College, Clemson University, Duke University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Florida State University, North Carolina State University, Syracuse University, the University of Louisville, the University of Miami, the University of North Carolina, the University of Notre Dame, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Virginia, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and Wake Forest University.

UNC women's soccer team

In 1979 UNC expanded Dorrance's duties to include the newly established women's team as well as the men's soccer team. It was this event which moved Dorrance into the limelight. At this time, the NCAA did not have a women's soccer championship. When the NCAA showed no interest in establishing one, Dorrance and University of Colorado coach, Chris Lidstone, approached the AIAW, who were receptive to the idea. [4] Within two years of the start of the program, Dorrance had guided the Tar Heels to the 1981 Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) title. After the AIAW led the way, the NCAA finally recognized women's soccer as an inter-collegiate sport and Dorrance's teams proceeded to dominate the sport. His teams won 12 of the first 13 NCAA championships (1982–1984, 1986–1994). After winning the 2012 NCAA championship, the Tar Heels have claimed a total of 23 national championships and 22 of the 37 NCAA championships.

Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women US womens college sports association

The Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) was founded in 1971 to govern collegiate women's athletics in the United States and to administer national championships. It evolved out of the Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics for Women. The association was one of the biggest advancements for women's athletics on the collegiate level. Throughout the 1970s, the AIAW grew rapidly in membership and influence, in parallel with the national growth of women's sports following the enactment of Title IX. The AIAW functioned in the equivalent role for college women's programs that the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) had been doing for men's programs. Owing to its own success, the AIAW was in a vulnerable position that precipitated conflicts with the NCAA in the early 1980s. Following a one-year overlap in which both organizations staged women's championships, the AIAW discontinued operation, and most member schools continued their women's athletics programs under the governance of the NCAA.

National Collegiate Athletic Association Non-profit organization that regulates many American college athletes and programs

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is a non-profit organization which regulates athletes of 1,268 North American institutions and conferences. It also organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States and Canada, and helps more than 480,000 college student-athletes who compete annually in college sports. The organization is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Dorrance's success comes from several interrelated attributes. First, he has an eye for recruiting outstanding talent. [5] Related to that is his emphasis on competitiveness. He noted early in his time as a women's coach that women seemed to have an inhibition against open competition. He decided to develop an atmosphere at UNC in which women were rewarded for having an aggressive desire to win. Finally, he noted from his work with both the men's and women's teams that women tended to play best in an atmosphere which focused on relationships. [6]

Dorrance was able to bring out his players' aggressiveness and competitiveness while also fostering an almost family sense of the team. [7] Regarding the aggressiveness, Santa Clara University women's soccer coach Jerry Smith noted in a 1998 Sports Illustrated article, "When you watch them, you can see the edge they have. I'll go beyond aggressiveness. It's meanness. Anson has found a way to bring that out of his players." Mia Hamm added in the same article, "I grew up always good at sports, but being a girl, I was never allowed to feel as good about it as guys were. My toughness wasn't celebrated. But then I came here, and it was O.K. to want to be the best." [8]

Head coaching record

SeasonTeamOverallConferenceStandingPostseason
North Carolina (Atlantic Coast Conference)(1979–present)
1979North Carolina10–2–0
1980North Carolina21–5–0AIAW Semifinals
1981North Carolina23–0–0AIAW Champions
1982North Carolina19–2–0NCAA Champions
1983North Carolina19–1–0NCAA Champions
1984North Carolina24–0–1-NCAA Champions
1985North Carolina18–2–1-NCAA Runner Up
1986North Carolina24–0–1-NCAA Champions
1987North Carolina23–0–13–0–01stNCAA Champions
1988North Carolina18–0–31–0–1ACC Runner UpNCAA Champions
1989North Carolina24–0–14–0–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Champions
1990North Carolina20–1–14–0–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Champions
1991North Carolina24–0–04–0–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Champions
1992North Carolina25–0–04–0–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Champions
1993North Carolina23–0–04–0–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Champions
1994North Carolina25–1–15–1–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Champions
1995North Carolina25–1–07–0–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Semifinals
1996North Carolina25–1–07–0–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Champions
1997North Carolina27–0–17–0–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Champions
1998North Carolina25–1–07–0–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Runner Up
1999North Carolina24–2–07–0–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Champions
2000North Carolina21–3–04–3–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Champions
2001North Carolina24–1–07–0–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Runner Up
2002North Carolina21–2–44–1–2ACC ChampionsNCAA Semifinals
2003North Carolina27–0–07–0–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Champions
2004North Carolina20–1–29–0–0ACC Runner UpNCAA Third Round
2005North Carolina23–1–19–1–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Quarterfinals
2006North Carolina27–1–010–0–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Champions
2007North Carolina19–4–19–1–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Third Round
2008North Carolina25–1–29–0–1ACC ChampionsNCAA Champions
2009North Carolina23–3–19–3–0ACC ChampionsNCAA Champions
2010North Carolina19–3–29–3–0ACC SemifinalsNCAA Third Round
2011North Carolina13–5–26–3–1ACC QuarterfinalsNCAA Third Round
2012North Carolina15–5–26–3–1ACC QuarterfinalsNCAA Champions
2013North Carolina20-5-010-3-0ACC SemifinalsNCAA Quarterfinals
2014North Carolina14-4-29-0–1ACC SemifinalsNCAA Third Round
2015North Carolina15–5–17-3-0ACC FinalistNCAA Second Round
2016North Carolina17-4-36–2-2ACC FinalistNCAA Semifinals
2017North Carolina17-3–28-0-2ACC ChampionsNCAA Third Round
North Carolina:809–67–36191–26–9
Total:981–132–28

      National champion        Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion        Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion      Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

National team coach

His success at North Carolina led to the United States Soccer Federation hiring Dorrance as the coach of the United States women's national soccer team in 1986. In taking the job Dorrance delivered a letter containing a stark warning to the players he inherited: "If you don't come in fit, I will cut you!" [9] He successfully juggled his duties to both the national team and UNC. In one extreme case, Dorrance left Assistant Coach Bill Palladino to lead UNC to a championship victory in the 1991 NCAA tournament while he led the US Women to a World Cup championship. In that tournament, the United States won the first Women's World Cup, held in China. When Dorrance ended his tenure in 1994 with the national team, he had accumulated a record of 66–22–5 (.737) record. He has coached some of the finest players in women's soccer history including Michelle Akers, Mia Hamm and Kristine Lilly.

In May 2005 Dorrance was elected as a member of the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame. In February 2016 he received the Werner Fricker Builder Award, a special award named after Werner Fricker. [10]

Court cases

In 1998 a former player, Melissa Jennings, sued Dorrance for sexual harassment. He had just cut her from the team. Initially, it appeared the suit was retaliation against Dorrance. However, Debbie Keller Hill, a former team captain, joined the suit. In October 2004 U.S. District Court Judge N. Carlton Tilley, Jr. threw out the six-year lawsuit, stating the "behavior at issue does not constitute severe, pervasive and objectively offensive sexual harassment." [11] In April 2006 a three judge federal appeals panel voted to not reverse the judgement (2–1). [12] Jennings appealed to the full court with oral arguments taking place in October 2006. [13] Hill had earlier settled with the university for $70,000. [14] The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, after a rehearing by the full court, vacated summary judgment for defendants in Jennings' lawsuit. The April 9, 2007 decision allowed Jennings to proceed on her Title IX claim and on sexual harassment civil rights claims under 42 U.S.C. § 1983 against Dorrance and a university official. Judge M. Blane Michael wrote in the 4th Circuit Court's majority opinion that Dorrance's conduct "went far beyond simple teasing and qualified as sexual harassment." [12]

On October 1, 2007 the U.S. Supreme Court denied a petition by the state Attorney General's Office for the court to hear a nine-year-old sexual harassment suit against UNC-Chapel Hill and its women's soccer coach, Anson Dorrance.

The refusal by the Supreme Court to hear the case meant that the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling from 2007 would stand and the case could proceed to trial. On January 14, 2008 the suit was settled out of court and Melissa Jennings will receive $385,000. The university also will review its sexual harassment policies and procedures, and bring in an outside law professor to help. The coach issued a written apology to the player, her family, and team members saying that his comments were inappropriate. [15]

See also

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References

  1. https://goheels.com/coaches.aspx?rc=1791&path=wsoc
  2. "Perez and Dorrance elected to Hall of Fame". Fox Sports . 2008-03-10. Archived from the original (– Scholar search ) on March 14, 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-11.
  3. http://graphics.fansonly.com/photos/schools/unc/sports/m-soccer/auto_pdf/uncsoccer4.pdf
  4. "Explaining variation in the Sex Composition of Coaches for Women's Intercollegiate Athletic Teams" (PDF).[ permanent dead link ]
  5. Anson Dorrance
  6. "Coaching Women: Going Against the Instincts of my Gender" (PDF).[ permanent dead link ] dead link
  7. "Numbers tell only half the story of UNC soccer coach's legacy".
  8. Anson Dorrance, the legendary North Carolina women's soccer coach, is sure he understands what makes a female athlete tick, and he has 15 national titles to prove it. So why are two former Tar Heels suing him for sexual harassment? dead link
  9. Lisi 2010 , p. 6
  10. U.S. Soccer Names Anson Dorrance 2016 Werner Fricker Builder Award Winner
  11. ESPN – Six-year-old suit dismissed days before trial – College Sports
  12. 1 2 http://pacer.ca4.uscourts.gov/opinion.pdf/042447.P.pdf
  13. newsobserver.com | Suit against coach revived Archived July 18, 2006, at the Wayback Machine
  14. "Harassment Case Involving Coach Settled". The New York Times. March 25, 2004. Retrieved April 25, 2010.
  15. Sexual harassment suit settled, North Carolina's Dorrance can move on – World Soccer – Yahoo! Sports Archived January 18, 2008, at the Wayback Machine

Bibliography