Clifford J. Rogers

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Clifford J. Rogers is a professor of history at the United States Military Academy at West Point. He has also been a Leverhulme Visiting Professor at Swansea University, an Olin Fellow in Military and Strategic History at Yale, and a Fulbright Fellow at the Institute of Historical Research in London.

Swansea University public research university located in Swansea, Wales, United Kingdom

Swansea University is a public research university located in Swansea, Wales, United Kingdom. It was chartered as University College of Swansea in 1920, as the fourth college of the University of Wales. In 1996, it changed its name to the University of Wales Swansea following structural changes within the University of Wales. The title of Swansea University was formally adopted on 1 September 2007 when the University of Wales became a non-membership confederal institution and the former members became universities in their own right.

Yale University Private research university in New Haven, Connecticut, United States

Yale University is a private Ivy League research university in New Haven, Connecticut. Founded in 1701, it is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one of the nine Colonial Colleges chartered before the American Revolution. Yale consistently ranks among the top universities in the world.

The Fulbright Program, including the Fulbright–Hays Program, is one of several United States Cultural Exchange Programs whose goal is to improve intercultural relations, cultural diplomacy, and intercultural competence between the people of the United States and other countries through the exchange of persons, knowledge, and skills. It is one of the most prestigious and competitive fellowship programs in the world. Via the program, competitively-selected American citizens including students, scholars, teachers, professionals, scientists and artists may receive scholarships or grants to study, conduct research, teach, or exercise their talents abroad; and citizens of other countries may qualify to do the same in the United States of America. The program was founded by United States Senator J. William Fulbright in 1946 and is considered to be one of the most widely recognized and prestigious scholarships in the world. The program provides 8,000 grants annually.

Rogers writes mainly on medieval military history. His War Cruel and Sharp: English Strategy under Edward III, 1327-1360 won the 2003 Verbruggen Prize awarded by De Re Militari. [1] He has also been awarded the Royal Historical Society's Alexander Prize medal and a Society for Military History Moncado Prize for his articles, some of which are collected in his Essays on Medieval Military History: Strategy, Military Revolutions and the Hundred Years War.

Royal Historical Society historical society based in London, England

The Royal Historical Society is a learned society of the United Kingdom which advances scholarly studies of history.

The Society for Military History is a United States-based international organization of scholars who research, write, and teach military history of all time periods and places. It includes naval history, air power history, and studies of technology, ideas, and homefronts. It publishes the quarterly refereed Journal of Military History.

His Soldiers' Lives through History: The Middle Ages [2] received the 2009 Verbruggen Prize. A podcast of a lecture based on part of that book, focusing on the soldier's experience of battle, has been posted online by the New York Military Affairs Symposium. [3]

Rogers is the editor of the three-volume Oxford Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology, which received a Distinguished Book Award from the Society for Military History, [4] The Wars of Edward III: Sources and Interpretations, and The Military Revolution Debate. He is co-editor of The Journal of Medieval Military History, [5] The West Point History of the Civil War, The West Point History of World War II, and The West Point History of the American Revolution (each of which received an Army Historical Foundation Distinguished Writing Award), and the essay collection Civilians in the Path of War. He is co-Senior Editor of the 71-chapter interactive digital military history textbook The West Point History of Warfare, which received the 2016 Society of Military History - George C. Marshall Foundation Prize for the Use of Digital Technology in Teaching Military History. [6]

Although Rogers' work on military revolutions has found favor with many historians, [7] some (including Kelly DeVries [8] and John Stone [9] ) argue that his analysis suffers from "technological determinism."

Publications

Books:

The Military Revolution Debate, ed. Clifford J. Rogers (Boulder: Westview Press, 1995). [Paperback and hardback. Kindle ed. 2011]

The Wars of Edward III: Sources and Interpretations, ed. Clifford J. Rogers (Woodbridge: Boydell and Brewer, 1999). [Paperback ed. 2010.]

War Cruel and Sharp: English Strategy under Edward III, 1327-1360 (Woodbridge: Boydell and Brewer, 2000). [Paperback ed. 2014.]

Civilians in the Path of War, ed. Mark Grimsley and Clifford J. Rogers (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2002). [Paperback ed. 2007.]

Soldiers’ Lives through History: The Middle Ages (New York: Greenwood, 2007).

Essays on Medieval Military History: Strategy, Military Revolutions, and the Hundred Years War (London: Ashgate/Variorum, 2010).

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology. Editor-in-Chief, Associate Editor for France, and joint Associate Editor for Britain. 3 vols. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010).

The West Point History of Warfare, Senior Editors Clifford J. Rogers and Ty Seidule. A 71-chapter history of warfare with 49 authors, created for iPad interactive format. Beta version released 2013-14. Version 1.0 release forthcoming 2015-16.

The West Point History of the Civil War, ed. Clifford J. Rogers, Ty Seidule, and Samuel J. Watson. Print edition: (New York: Simon and Schuster, Oct. 2014). Enhanced E-Book Edition: (New York: Rowan Technologies Solutions, October 2014).

The West Point History of World War II, vol. 1, ed. Clifford J. Rogers, Ty Seidule, and Steve R. Waddell. Print edition: (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2015). Enhanced E-Book Edition: (New York: Rowan Technologies Solutions, 2015).

The West Point History of World War II, vol. 2, ed. Clifford J. Rogers, Ty Seidule, and Steve R. Waddell. Print edition: (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2016). Enhanced E-Book Edition: (New York: Rowan Technologies Solutions, 2016)

The West Point History of the American Revolution, ed. Clifford J. Rogers, Ty Seidule, and Samuel J. Watson. Print edition: (New York: Simon and Schuster, Oct. 2017). Enhanced E-Book Edition: (New York: Rowan Technologies Solutions, October 2017).

Scholarly articles and book chapters:

"Edward III and the Dialectics of Strategy, 1327-1360," Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 6th ser., 4 (1994): 83-102. Reprinted in The Wars of Edward III, and in Kelly DeVries, ed., Medieval Warfare, 1300-1450 (London: Ashgate, 2010).

"The Military Revolutions of the Hundred Years’ War," The Journal of Military History, 57 (April, 1993): 241-278. Reprinted with revisions in C. J. Rogers, ed. The Military Revolution Debate (Boulder: Westview, 1995), and reprinted in Paul E. J. Hammer, ed. Warfare in Early Modern Europe, 1450-1660 (London: Ashgate, 2007).

“The Offensive/Defensive in Medieval Strategy,” From Crecy to Mohacs: Warfare in the Late Middle Ages (1346-1526). Acta of the XXIInd Colloquium of the International Commission of Military History (Vienna, 1996) (Vienna: Heeresgeschichtliches Museum/Militärhistorisches Institut, 1997): 158-171.

“The Efficacy of the Medieval Longbow: A Reply to Kelly DeVries,” War in History 5, no. 2 (1998): 233-42.

“An Unknown News Bulletin from the Siege of Tournai in 1340,” War in History, 5, no. 3 (1998): 358-366.

“The Scottish Invasion of 1346,” Northern History, XXXIV (1998): 51-69.

“Three New Accounts of the Neville’s Cross Campaign,” C. J. Rogers and M. C. Buck. Northern History, XXXIV (1998): 70-81.

“The Age of the Hundred Years' War,” in Medieval Warfare: A History, ed. Maurice Keen (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999): 136-160.

“A Continuation of the Manuel d'histoire de Philippe VI for the Years 1328-1339,” English Historical Review, CXIV (1999): 1256-1266.

“ ‘Military Revolutions’ and ‘Revolutions in Military Affairs’: A Historian’s Perspective” in Thierry Gongora and Harald von Riekhoff (eds.), Toward a Revolution in Military Affairs? Defense and Security at the Dawn of the 21st Century. (Westport: Greenwood Press, 2000): 21-36.

"The Anglo-French Peace Negotiations of 1354-1360 Reconsidered," in The Age of Edward III, ed. James Bothwell (York: York Medieval Press, 2001): 193-213.

“‘As If a New Sun Had Arisen:’ England’s Fourteenth-century RMA,” in The Dynamics of Military Revolution, 1300-2050, ed. MacGregor Knox and Williamson Murray (Cambridge: Cambridge U.P., 2001): 15-34.

"By Fire and Sword: Bellum Hostile and 'Civilians' in the Hundred Years War,” in Civilians in the Path of War, ed. Mark Grimsley and Clifford J. Rogers (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2002): 33-78.

“Clausewitz, Genius, and the Rules,” Journal of Military History, 66 (2002): 1167-76.

“The Vegetian ‘Science of Warfare’ in the Middle Ages,” Journal of Medieval Military History 1 (2003): 1-20.

“The Bergerac Campaign (1345) and the Generalship of Henry of Lancaster,” Journal of Medieval Military History 2 (2004): 89-110.

“The Medieval Legacy,” Early Modern Military History, ed. Geoff Mortimer (London: Palgrave, 2004): 6-24.

“Henry V’s Military Strategy in 1415,” The Hundred Years War: A Wider Focus, ed. L. J. Andrew Villalon and Donald J. Kagay (Leiden: Brill, 2005): 399-427.

“Sir Thomas Dagworth in Brittany, 1346-7: Restellou and La Roche Derrien,” Journal of Medieval Military History 3 (2005): 127-154.

“The Battle of Agincourt,” The Hundred Years War (Part II): Different Vistas, ed. L. J. Andrew Villalon and Donald J. Kagay (Leiden: Brill, 2008): 37-132.

“The Practice of War,” A Companion to the Medieval World, ed. Edward D. English and Carol L. Lansing (London: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009): 435-454.

“The Black Prince in Gascony and France (1355-6), According to MS78 of Corpus Christi College, Oxford,” Journal of Medieval Military History 7 (2009): 168-175.

“The Idea of Military Revolutions in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Texts,” Revista de História das Ideias 30 (2009): 395-415.

"Tactics and the Face of Battle,” in Frank Tallett and D.J.B. Trim, eds. European Warfare, 1350-1750 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010): 203-235.

“The Artillery and Artillery Fortress Revolutions Revisited,” in Nicolas Prouteau, Emmanuel de Crouy-Chanel and Nicolas Faucherre, eds., Artillerie et Fortification, 1200-1600 (Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2011): 75-80.

“The Longbow, the Infantry Revolution, and Technological Determinism,” The Journal of Medieval History 37 (2011): 321-341.

“Giraldus Cambrensis, Edward I, and the Conquest of Wales,” in Successful Strategies. Triumphing in War and Peace from Antiquity to the Present, ed. Williamson Murray and Richard Hart Sinnreich (Cambridge: Cambridge U.P., 2014): 65-99.

“Carolingian Cavalry in Battle: The Evidence Reconsidered,” in Crusading and Warfare in the Middle Ages: Realities and Representations. Essays in Honour of John France, ed. Simon John and Nicolas Morton (Farnham: Ashgate, 2014), 1-11.

“Early and High Medieval Warfare,” The West Point History of Warfare, senior eds. Clifford J. Rogers and James T. Seidule, chapter eds. Clifford J. Rogers and John Stapleton, Jr. (New York: Rowan Technology Solutions, 2015).

“Warfare in the Late Middle Ages: The Hundred Years War, 1337-1453,” The West Point History of Warfare, ed. Clifford J. Rogers and James T. Seidule, vol. 1, European Warfare to 1900, senior eds. Clifford J. Rogers and James T. Seidule, chapter eds. Clifford J. Rogers and John Stapleton, Jr. (New York: Rowan Technology Solutions, 2015).

“Warfare, 500-1500,” in The Cambridge History of the World, vol. 5, Expanding Webs of Exchange and Conquest, 500 CE-1500 CE, ed. Benjamin Kedar and Merry Wiesner-Hanks (Cambridge: Cambridge U.P., 2015.)

“Afghanistan: The Thirty Years War and Counting,” by Lester W. Grau and Clifford J. Rogers, in The West Point History of Warfare, senior eds. Clifford J. Rogers and James T. Seidule, chapter eds. Clifford J. Rogers and Gail Yoshitani. (New York: Rowan Technology Solutions, 2015).

“The War at Mid-Point,” in The West Point History of World War II, vol. 1, ed. Clifford J. Rogers, Ty Seidule and Steve R. Waddell (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2015), 281-290.

"The Anglo-Burgundian Alliance in the Hundred Years' War,” Grand Strategy and Alliances, ed. Peter Mansoor and Williamson Murray (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016), 216-253.

“Assessing the Wars of the French Revolution and Napoleon: Clausewitz and Jomini,” (e-book chapter) in The West Point History of Warfare, ed. Clifford J. Rogers and Ty Seidule; chapter eds. Clifford J. Rogers and John Stapleton, Jr. (New York: Rowan Technology Solutions, 2017).

“The Symbolic Meaning of Edward III’s Garter Badge,” in Gary Baker, Craig Lambert, and David Simpkin, eds., Military Communities in Late Medieval England: Essays in Honour of Andrew Ayton (Woodbridge: Boydell, 2018): 125-146.

“Medieval Strategy and the Economics of Conquest,” The Journal of Military History 82 (2018): 709-38.

“Gunpowder Artillery in Europe, 1326-1500: Innovation and Impact,” in Robert S. Ehlers, Jr.; Sarah K. Douglas; and Daniel P. M. Curzon, eds., Technology, Violence and War. Essays in Honor of John F. Guilmartin, Jr. (Leiden: Brill, 2019): 39-71.

“A Note on Chandos Herald at the Battle of Nájera (1367),” The Medieval Chronicle 12 (2019): 227-37.

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References

  1. "Minutes from the De Re Militari Business Meeting". De Re Militari. March 8, 2003. Archived from the original on January 15, 2008. Retrieved 2008-03-06.
  2. Review from TMR available online at http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=tmr;cc=tmr;q1=soldiers%20%20lives;rgn=main;view=text;idno=baj9928.0901.012.
  3. http://nymas.org/podcasts.html
  4. https://web.archive.org/web/20101129154735/http://smh-hq.org/awards/awards/books.html. Archived from the original on November 29, 2010. Retrieved March 2, 2011.Missing or empty |title= (help)
  5. The Journal of Medieval Military History
  6. "SMH GCMF Digital Prize".
  7. For example, Chase, Firearms, p. 224; Gat, War in Human Civilization, p.763; Parker, Military Revolution (1996), p. 185, Gruber, "Atlantic Warfare, 1440-1763," 418.
  8. Kelly DeVries, “Catapults are Not Atom Bombs: Towards a Redefinition of ‘Effectiveness’ in Premodern Military Technology,” War in History, 4 (1997): 454-70; cf. C. J. Rogers, “The Efficacy of the English Longbow: A Reply to Kelly DeVries,” War in History, 5 (1998):233-42.
  9. Journal of Military History; Apr 2004, Vol. 68 Issue 2, p361-380