David Loades

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David Michael Loades FSA (19 January 1934 – 21 April 2016) [1] [2] was a British historian specialising in the Tudor era. He was Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Wales, where he taught from 1980 until 1996, and was Honorary Research Professor at the University of Sheffield from 1996 until 2008. [1] In the 1960s and 1970s he taught at the universities of St. Andrews and Durham. [1] From 1993 until 2004 he acted as Literary Director of the John Foxe Project at the British Academy; [1] [3] he subsequently became an Honorary Member of the History Faculty at the University of Oxford. [4] After military service in the Royal Air Force 19531955, [1] Loades studied at the University of Cambridge. He wrote many books on the Tudor period, including biographies. [5] He was President of the Ecclesiastical History Society (1992-93). [6]

A historian is a person who studies and writes about the past, and is regarded as an authority on it. Historians are concerned with the continuous, methodical narrative and research of past events as relating to the human race; as well as the study of all history in time. If the individual is concerned with events preceding written history, the individual is a historian of prehistory. Some historians are recognized by publications or training and experience. "Historian" became a professional occupation in the late nineteenth century as research universities were emerging in Germany and elsewhere.

University of Wales confederal university based in Cardiff, Wales, UK

The University of Wales was a confederal university based in Cardiff, Wales, UK. Founded by Royal Charter in 1893 as a federal university with three constituent colleges – Aberystwyth, Bangor and Cardiff – the university was the first and oldest university in Wales, one of the four countries in the United Kingdom. The university was the second largest university in the UK.

University of Sheffield university in England, United Kingdom

The University of Sheffield is a public research university in Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England. It received its royal charter in 1905 as successor to the University College of Sheffield, which was established in 1897 by the merger of Sheffield Medical School, Firth College (1879) and Sheffield Technical School (1884).

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Works

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Debretts.com Retrieved 2011-03-11
  2. "News of Fellows". Salon. Society of Antiquaries of London. 364. Retrieved 26 May 2016.
  3. BBC History Magazine, Vol. 7, No. 3, March 2006, p. 40
  4. History Tutorials: Meet the Tutors Archived 2012-03-21 at the Wayback Machine . Retrieved 2011-02-26
  5. The American Historical Review, Vol. 109, No. 2, April 2004 Archived 2007-05-09 at the Wayback Machine . Retrieved 27-10-2010
  6. Past Presidents - Ecclesiastical History Society

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