Dorothy Compton

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Dorothy Compton was an American voice actress born in the early 1900s. An early friend of Walt Disney, she made her first acting debut in The Three Little Pigs (1933) as the voice of Fifer Pig. From 1933 onward she made more appearances in the next 3 installments of the Three Little Pigs: The Big Bad Wolf (1934), The Three Little Wolves (1936) and The Practical Pig (1939) along with minor appearances in It's Great to Be Alive (1933) and I Married an Angel (1942).

She was a member of the vocal trio The Rhythmettes, which also included Bonnie Poe, Mae Questel and Mary Moder. [1]

After her time with the Rhythmettes, she became a member of Ted Fiorito's Debutantes. [2]

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References

  1. Merritt, Russell; Kaufman, J.B. (2016). Walt Disney's Silly Symphonies: A Companion to the Classic Cartoon Series. Disney Editions. p. 86. ISBN   978-1-4847-5132-9.
  2. "Fiorito's New Singing Girl". The Los Angeles Times. 1934-05-22. p. 18. Retrieved 2020-12-19.
  1. Dorothy Compton on IMDb