The Big Bad Wolf (1934 film)

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The Big Bad Wolf
The Big Bad Wolf.png
Directed by Burt Gillett
Produced by Walt Disney
Starring Sara Berner,
Pinto Colvig,
Billy Bletcher,
Mary Moder,
Dorothy Compton
Music by Frank Churchill
Animation byArt Babbitt
Color process Technicolor
Production
company
Distributed by United Artists
Release date
April 13, 1934
Running time
9 minutes
LanguageEnglish

The Big Bad Wolf is an animated short released on April 13, 1934, by United Artists, produced by Walt Disney and directed by Burt Gillett as part of the Silly Symphony series. [1] Acting partly as a sequel to the wildly successful adaptation of The Three Little Pigs of the previous year (maintaining the previous film's title characters as well as its villain), this film also acts as an adaptation of the fairy-tale Little Red Riding Hood , with the Big Bad Wolf from 1933's Three Little Pigs acting as the adversary to Little Red Riding Hood and her grandmother.

Contents

Plot

Ignoring the advice of Practical Pig, Little Red Riding Hood, escorted by Fiddler and Fifer, takes the short cut through the woods to Grandma's house. They end up encountering Goldilocks the Fairy Queen, who is soon revealed, thanks to a branch breaking, to be the Big Bad Wolf in disguise. Realizing they'd been tricked, Fiddler and Fifer run home, whilst Little Red Riding Hood escapes from the Wolf. The Big Bad Wolf, however, isn't giving up on getting dinner, and goes to Grandma's house, where he chases Grandma into the closet and gets in bed disguised as her. Little Red Riding Hood arrives and after the expected "what big eyes/nose/mouth you've got" spiel is terrified to see the Big Bad Wolf is posing as her grandmother. Fiddler and Fifer manage to get Practical Pig, who manages to beat the Wolf by putting popcorn seeds and hot coals down his pants. With the wolf defeated once again, Little Red Riding Hood and the pigs sing and play "Who's Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf".

Voice cast

Reaction

Made as a somewhat reluctant response to the success of the earlier short, The Big Bad Wolf did not quite achieve the levels of popularity of Three Little Pigs (which was huge), [2] though two more shorts predominantly featuring the Big Bad Wolf and the pigs came about ( The Three Little Wolves and The Practical Pig ), in addition to countless appearances in a variety of shorts, comic strips, war-time propaganda pieces and TV series.

Home media

The short was released on December 4, 2001, on Walt Disney Treasures: Silly Symphonies - The Historic Musical Animated Classics . [3] [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Merritt, Russell; Kaufman, J. B. (2016). Walt Disney's Silly Symphonies: A Companion to the Classic Cartoon Series (2nd ed.). Glendale, CA: Disney Editions. pp. 142–143. ISBN   978-1-4847-5132-9.
  2. Bob Thomas, "Disney's Art of Animation: From Mickey Mouse to Hercules" (1997) p.50
  3. "Silly Symphonies: The Historic Musical Animated Classics DVD Review". DVD Dizzy. Retrieved February 20, 2021.