Springtime (1929 film)

Last updated

Springtime
Directed by Ub Iwerks
Produced by Walt Disney
Music by Carl W. Stalling
Animation by
Backgrounds byCarlos Manriquez
Production
company
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release date
  • October 24, 1929 (1929-10-24)
Running time
6:14
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Springtime is a Silly Symphonies animated Disney short film. It was released in 1929. It was the third Silly Symphonies film to be produced, just five days before the 1929 Stock Market Crash. [1]

Contents

Plot

Flowers, ladybugs, centipedes, birds, and frogs dance (and devour each other) in time to the usual blend of themes from the light classics.

The music used in the film includes "Morning Mood" from Edvard Grieg's Peer Gynt , Franz von Blon's "Whispering Flowers", Amilcare Ponchielli's music for "Dance of the Hours" and Jacques Offenbach's "Gaîté Parisienne". [2]

Reception

Motion Picture News (November 2, 1929): "A Panic. Another contribution to the entertainment of the nation. Walt Disney has been hitting an extremely high average with his various cartoon series. This one is well worth whatever praise this reporter may bestow upon it. The basis of the amusing antics is the line which ruminates about springtime, love and levity. Everything turns terpsichore: flowers, spiders, cranes, frogs. The routines they pass through are guaranteed to make any audience laugh." [3]

The Film Daily (November 3, 1929): "This is called a Disney Silly Symphony, and it is a corker. The cartoon work is about the best that has ever been seen in the animated field, the expressions and general antics of the animals being unusually clever as well as true to life. A series of frogs graduating in size are swallowed by each other in turn, till only the last big frog is left. This one in turn is swallowed by a long-legged bird, who is so weighted down that he flops in a pond and is drowned. The clever conceit is a fine satire on the survival of the fittest in the animal world. The synchronized music accompanying the dancing music of the frogs adds greatly to the laughs, which come easily." [4]

Variety (February 12, 1930): "Another amusing, ingeniously made cartoon comedy drawn by Walt Disney. Oke for any theatre. In Springtime Disney has sought to express that vernal feeling of animated insect, animal and flower characters in novel dance routines set to intriguing musical numbers. Timing of the dances, the accompanying taps, etc., is so perfect that the rhythm alone imparts rare entertainment value to this new one in the Silly Symphony series. Every opportunity to inject comedy for laughs has also been seized. Some repetition in the nature of the dance routines but not serious." [5]

Home media

The short was released on December 19, 2006, on Walt Disney Treasures: More Silly Symphonies, Volume Two . [2]

The cartoon also makes an appearance in the animated One Hundred and One Dalmatians , when the puppies are watching TV with Horace and Jasper.

Similarly, one of the music piece from the latter half of the short would later be reused for the full "Dance of the Hours" segment in Walt Disney's 1940 film, Fantasia .

Related Research Articles

<i>Plane Crazy</i> 1929 Mickey Mouse short by Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks

Plane Crazy is a 1929 American animated short film directed by Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks. The cartoon, released by the Walt Disney Studios, was the first Mickey Mouse film produced, and was originally a silent film. It was given a test screening to a theater audience on May 15, 1928, and an executive from Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer saw the film, but failed to pick up a distributor. Later that year, Disney released Mickey's first sound cartoon, Steamboat Willie, which was an enormous success. Apart from that, Plane Crazy was released again as a sound cartoon on March 1929. It was the fourth Mickey film to be released after Steamboat Willie, The Gallopin' Gaucho, and The Barn Dance (1929).

<i>Silly Symphony</i> Series of animated short films produced by Walt Disney Productions from 1929 to 1939

Silly Symphony is an American animated series of 75 musical short films produced by Walt Disney Productions from 1929 to 1939. As the series name implies, the Silly Symphonies were originally intended as whimsical accompaniments to pieces of music. As such, the films usually had independent continuity and did not feature continuing characters, unlike the Mickey Mouse shorts produced by Disney at the same time. The series is notable for its innovation with Technicolor and the multiplane motion picture camera, as well as its introduction of the character Donald Duck making his first appearance in the Silly Symphony cartoon The Wise Little Hen in 1934. Seven shorts won the Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film.

<i>The Skeleton Dance</i> 1929 film

The Skeleton Dance is a 1929 Silly Symphony animated short subject produced and directed by Walt Disney and animated by Ub Iwerks. In the film, four human skeletons dance and make music around a spooky graveyard—a modern film example of medieval European "danse macabre" imagery. It is the first entry in the Silly Symphony series.

Wild Waves is a Mickey Mouse short animated film first released on December 21, 1929, as part of the Mickey Mouse film series. It was the fifteenth Mickey Mouse short to be produced, the twelfth of that year.

Summer is a Walt Disney short film released on January 6, 1930. Directed by Ub Iwerks, it is the sequel to the short Springtime (1929). It is 6 minutes long.

<i>El Terrible Toreador</i> 1929 film

El Terrible Toreador is a 1929 animated cartoon produced by Walt Disney Studios in the Silly Symphonies series.

Mother Goose Melodies is a 1931 Silly Symphonies animated film, directed by Burt Gillett. Two years later it was semi remade in Technicolor as Old King Cole.

The Busy Beavers is a 1931 Silly Symphonies animated film, directed by Burt Gillett.

<i>The Merry Dwarfs</i> 1929 American film

The Merry Dwarfs is a Silly Symphonies animated Disney short film. It was released in 1929.

Cannibal Capers is a Silly Symphonies animated Disney short film. It was released in 1930.

Frolicking Fish is a Silly Symphonies animated Disney short film. It was released in 1930.

Arctic Antics is a Silly Symphonies animated Disney short film. It was released on June 26, 1930.

Night is a Silly Symphonies animated Disney short film. It was released in 1930 by Columbia Pictures.

Monkey Melodies is a Silly Symphonies animated Disney short film. It was released in 1930 as the 13th film in the Silly Symphony Series.

Winter is a Silly Symphonies animated Disney short film. It was released on October 30, 1930, by Columbia Pictures.

The Cat's Out is a Silly Symphonies animated Disney short film. It was released in 1931. The Cat's Out was a working title that survives on an existing vault print; the short was originally copyrighted and released as The Cat's Nightmare.

<i>The Haunted House</i> (1929 film) 1929 Mickey Mouse cartoon

The Haunted House, also known as Haunted House, is a 1929 Mickey Mouse short animated film released by Celebrity Productions, as part of the Mickey Mouse film series. The cartoon was produced by Walt Disney Productions and distributed by Celebrity Productions. It was the fourteenth Mickey Mouse short to be produced, the eleventh of that year.

<i>Jungle Rhythm</i> 1929 Mickey Mouse cartoon

Jungle Rhythm is a Mickey Mouse short animated film first released on November 15, 1929, as part of the Mickey Mouse film series. It was the thirteenth Mickey Mouse short to be produced, the tenth of that year.

<i>The Cactus Kid</i> (1930 film) 1930 Mickey Mouse cartoon

The Cactus Kid is a Mickey Mouse short animated film first released on May 10, 1930, as part of the Mickey Mouse film series. It was the eighteenth Mickey Mouse short to be produced, the third of that year.

Hell's Bells is a 1929 animated short film which was directed by Ub Iwerks and was distributed into cinemas by the film company Columbia Pictures, who would also distribute other Walt Disney films, such as Winter. The film follows Satan and the other devils' happenings in Hell. One of these devils revolts against Satan, and end up kicking him off the cliff of Hell at the end of the film.

References

  1. Barrier, Michael (November 6, 2003). Hollywood Cartoons: American Animation in Its Golden Age. Oxford University Press. p. 61. ISBN   978-0-19-516729-0 . Retrieved July 19, 2012.
  2. 1 2 Merritt, Russell; Kaufman, J. B. (2016). Walt Disney's Silly Symphonies: A Companion to the Classic Cartoon Series (2nd ed.). Glendale, CA: Disney Editions. pp. 60–61. ISBN   978-1-4847-5132-9.
  3. "Sennett Comedies, Oswald and Disney Cartoons Top Shorts List". Motion Picture News : 97. November 2, 1929. Retrieved February 23, 2020.
  4. "Short Subjects". The Film Daily : 9. November 3, 1929. Retrieved February 23, 2020.
  5. "Talking Shorts". Variety : 18. February 12, 1930. Retrieved February 23, 2020.