Eleuchadius

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Saint Eleuchadius
Bishop of Ravenna
Died112
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church and Eastern Orthodox Church
Feast 14 February

Saint Eleuchadius (died 112) is a 2nd-century Christian saint venerated by the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Church.

He was a Greek who was converted to Christianity by Saint Apollinaris. He was Bishop of Ravenna from 100 to 112 AD, succeeding Saint Adheritus. [1]

Notes


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