Eric Bettinger

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Eric P. Bettinger is an American economist and currently works as a Professor at the Stanford Graduate School of Education. [1] He ranks among the world's leading education economists. [2]

Contents

Biography

Eric Bettinger earned a B.A. in economics from Brigham Young University in 1996 and a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2000. After his graduation, he became a professor at Case Western Reserve University. Since 2008, Bettinger has been a Professor of Education at the Stanford Graduate School of Education as well as a Professor of Economics (by courtesy) at the Stanford School of Business. Moreover, he is affiliated with the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab. Other affiliations include the Stanford Center for Education Policy Analysis, the Lemann Center for Entrepreneurship and Educational Innovation in Brazil, the Stanford Center for International Development, the Center for the Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment and the Center for the Analysis of Postsecondary Readiness at Teacher's College. [3]

Research

Eric Bettinger's current research interests include the economics of education, educational policy, higher education, and comparative education. [4] According to IDEAS/RePEc, Bettinger belongs to the 5% of most highly cited economists worldwide. [5] Key findings of his research include:

Impact evaluations of educational interventions in primary and secondary school

Impact evaluations of educational interventions in higher education

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References

  1. Profile of Eric Bettinger on the website of the Stanford Graduate School of Education. Retrieved March 28th, 2018.
  2. Eric Bettinger belongs to the top 3% of education economists registered on IDEAS/RePEc. Retrieved March 28th, 2018.
  3. Curriculum vitae of Eric Bettinger from his homepage. Retrieved March 28th, 2018.
  4. Profile of Eric Bettinger on the website of the Stanford Graduate School of Education. Retrieved March 28th, 2018.
  5. Ranking of economists registered on IDEAS/RePEc. Retrieved March 28th, 2018.
  6. Bettinger, E.P. (2012). Paying to Learn: The Effect of Financial Incentives on Elementary School Test Scores. Review of Economics and Statistics, 94(3), pp. 686-698.
  7. Angrist, J. et al. (2002). Vouchers for Private Schooling in Colombia: Evidence from a Randomized Natural Experiment. American Economic Review, 92(5), pp. 1535-1558.
  8. Angrist, J., Bettinger, E., Kremer, M. (2006). Long-Term Educational Consequences of Secondary School Vouchers: Evidence from Administrative Records in Colombia. American Economic Review, 96(3), pp. 847-862.
  9. Bettinger, E.P. (2005). The effect of charter schools on charter students and public schools. Economics of Education Review, 24(2), pp. 133-147.
  10. Bettinger, E.P., Long, B.T. (2009). Addressing the Needs of Underprepared Students in Higher Education: Does College Remediation Work? Journal of Human Resources, 44(3), pp. 736-771.
  11. Bettinger, E.P. et al. (2012). The Role of Application Assistance and Information in College Decisions: Results from H&R Block Fafsa Experiment. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 127(3), pp. 1205-1242.
  12. Bettinger, E. (2004). How Financial Aid Affects Persistence. In: Hoxby, C.M. (ed.). College Choices: The Economics of Where to Go, When to Go, and How to Pay For It. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 207-237.
  13. Bettinger, E.P., Long, B.T. (2005). Do Faculty Serve as Role Models? The Impact of Instructor Gender on Female Students. AEA Papers & Proceedings, 95(2), pp. 152-157.
  14. Bettinger, E.P., Long, B.T. (2010). Does Cheaper Mean Better? The Impact of Using Adjunct Instructors on Student Outcomes. Review of Economics and Statistics, 92(3), pp. 598-613.
  15. Bettinger, E., Baker, R. (2011). The Effects of Student Coaching in College: An Evaluation of a Randomized Experiment in Student Mentoring. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 36(1), pp. 3-19.