Eugene Magennis

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Eugene Magennis was at times Bishop of Down and Connor [1] during the period from 1539 to 1563. [2]

The Bishop of Down and Connor is an episcopal title which takes its name from the town of Downpatrick and the village of Connor in Northern Ireland. The title is still used by the Roman Catholic Church, but in the Church of Ireland it has been united with other bishoprics.

A Papal appointee from 1539, and already Archdeacon of Down, [3] he accepted royal supremacy and was confirmed by letters patent on 8 May 1542. Magennis retained possession during the reign of Queen Mary I; and probably attended the 1560 parliament where he took the Oath of Supremacy. [4]

Archdeacon of Down

The Archdeacon of Down is a senior ecclesiastical officer within the Diocese of Down and Dromore. As such he or she is responsible for the disciplinary supervision of the clergy. within the diocese. The archdeaconry can trace its history back to Bernard who held the office in 1268. The current incumbent is David McClay.

Letters patent type of legal instrument in the form of a published written order

Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of a published written order issued by a monarch, president, or other head of state, generally granting an office, right, monopoly, title, or status to a person or corporation. Letters patent can be used for the creation of corporations or government offices, or for the granting of city status or a coat of arms. Letters patent are issued for the appointment of representatives of the Crown, such as governors and governors-general of Commonwealth realms, as well as appointing a Royal Commission. In the United Kingdom they are also issued for the creation of peers of the realm. A particular form of letters patent has evolved into the modern patent granting exclusive rights in an invention. In this case it is essential that the written grant should be in the form of a public document so other inventors can consult it to avoid infringement and also to understand how to "practice" the invention, i.e., put it into practical use. In the Holy Roman Empire, Austrian Empire and Austria-Hungary, imperial patent was also the highest form of generally binding legal regulations, e. g. Patent of Toleration, Serfdom Patent etc.

Mary I of England Queen of England and Ireland from 1553-1558

Mary I, also known as Mary Tudor, was the Queen of England and Ireland from July 1553 until her death. She is best known for her aggressive attempt to reverse the English Reformation, which had begun during the reign of her father, Henry VIII. The executions that marked her pursuit of the restoration of Roman Catholicism in England and Ireland led to her denunciation as "Bloody Mary" by her Protestant opponents.

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References

  1. "Fasti Ecclesiae Hibernicae: The succession of the prelates Volume 3" Cotton, H. pp 202/3 Dublin, Hodges & Smith, 1848–1878
  2. Handbook of British Chronology By Fryde, E. B;. Greenway, D.E;Porter, S; Roy, I: Cambridge, CUP, 1996 ISBN   0-521-56350-X, 0713642556
  3. "Fasti Ecclesiae Hibernicae: The succession of the prelates Volume 3" Cotton,H. p230/31 Dublin, Hodges & Smith, 1848-1878
  4. Tanner, M. (2003). Ireland's Holy Wars: The Struggle for a Nation's Soul, 1500-2000. Yale University Press. p. 86. ISBN   9780300092813 . Retrieved 2017-09-10.