Bishop of Down, Connor and Dromore

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The Bishop of Down, Connor and Dromore was the Ordinary of the Church of Ireland diocese of Down, Connor and Dromore; comprising all County Down and County Antrim, including the city of Belfast.

Church of Ireland Anglican church in Ireland

The Church of Ireland is a Christian church in Ireland and an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion. It is organised on an all-Ireland basis and is the second largest Christian church on the island after the Catholic Church. Like other Anglican churches, it has retained elements of pre-Reformation practice, notably its episcopal polity, while rejecting the primacy of the Pope. In theological and liturgical matters, it incorporates many principles of the Reformation, particularly those espoused during the English Reformation. The church self-identifies as being both catholic and Reformed. Within the church, differences exist between those members who are more Catholic-leaning and those who are more Protestant-leaning (evangelical). For historical and cultural reasons, the Church of Ireland is generally identified as a Protestant church.

Diocese Christian district or see under the supervision of a bishop

The word diocese is derived from the Greek term dioikesis (διοίκησις) meaning "administration". Today, when used in an ecclesiastical sense, it refers to the ecclesiastical district under the jurisdiction of a bishop. Sometimes it is also called bishopric.

County Down Place in Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

County Down is one of six counties that form Northern Ireland, in the northeast of the island of Ireland. It covers an area of 2,448 km2 and has a population of 531,665. It is also one of the thirty-two traditional counties of Ireland and is within the province of Ulster. It borders County Antrim to the north, the Irish Sea to the east, County Armagh to the west, and County Louth across Carlingford Lough to the southwest.

Contents

History

The episcopal sees of Down and Connor were united in 1442. After the Reformation, the bishopric of Down and Connor continued until 1842 when they were amalgamated with the see of Dromore to form the united see of Down, Connor and Dromore. Since 1945, the see has been separated into the bishopric of Down and Dromore and the bishopric of Connor. [1] [2]

Episcopal see the main administrative seat held by a bishop

An episcopal see is, in the usual meaning of the phrase, the area of a bishop's ecclesiastical jurisdiction.

Bishop of Down Wikimedia list article

The Bishop of Down was an episcopal title which took its name from the town of Downpatrick in Northern Ireland. The bishop's seat (Cathedra) was located on the site of the present cathedral church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity in the Church of Ireland.

The Bishop of Connor is an episcopal title which takes its name after the village of Connor in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. The title is currently used by the Church of Ireland, but in the Roman Catholic Church it has been united with another bishopric.

List of bishops

Bishops of Down, Connor and Dromore
FromUntilIncumbentNotes
18421848 Richard Mant Appointed Bishop of Down and Connor in 1823; became Bishop of Down, Connor and Dromore on 9 April 1842; died 2 November 1848.
18491886 Robert Knox Nominated 2 April and consecrated 1 May 1849; translated to Armagh 11 May 1886.
18861892 William Reeves Elected 18 March and consecrated 29 June 1886; died 12 January 1892.
18921907 Thomas Welland Elected 19 February and consecrated 25 March 1892; died 29 July 1907.
19071911 John Crozier Translated from Ossory, Ferns and Leighlin; elected 3 September and confirmed 26 September 1907; translated to Armagh 2 February 1911.
19111919 Charles D'Arcy Translated from Ossory, Ferns and Leighlin; elected 27 March and confirmed 29 March 1911; translated to Dublin 6 August 1919.
19191934 Charles Grierson Elected 9 October and consecrated 28 October 1919; resigned in November 1934; died 9 July 1935.
19341942 John MacNeice Translated from Cashel and Waterford; elected 11 December and confirmed 12 December 1934; died 14 April 1942.
19421945 Charles King Irwin Translated from Limerick, Ardfert and Aghadoe; elected 6 August and confirmed 17 November 1942; relinquished the sees of Down and Dromore 1 January 1945, but continued as Bishop of Connor.
In 1945, the see was separated into the bishoprics of Down & Dromore and Connor.
Source(s): [1] [2] [3]

See also

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Archdeacon of Down

The Archdeacon of Down is a senior ecclesiastical officer within the Diocese of Down and Dromore. As such he or she is responsible for the disciplinary supervision of the clergy. within the diocese. The archdeaconry can trace its history back to Bernard who held the office in 1268. The current incumbent is David McClay.

References

  1. 1 2 Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 385 and 389. ISBN   0-521-56350-X.
  2. 1 2 Crockford's Clerical Directory 2008/2009 (100th edition), Church House Publishing ( ISBN   978-0-7151-1030-0).
  3. "Historical successions: Down". Crockford's Clerical Directory. Retrieved 22 July 2012.