Everitt

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1910 Everitt Four-30 Touring. 1910 Everitt Touring Car (2528727057).jpg
1910 Everitt Four-30 Touring.

The Everitt was an American automobile manufactured from 1909 until 1912 by the Metzger Motor Car Company in Detroit.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the most populous city is New York City. Most of the country is located contiguously in North America between Canada and Mexico.

Detroit Largest city in Michigan

Detroit is the largest and most populous city in the U.S. state of Michigan, the largest American city on the United States–Canada border, and the seat of Wayne County. The municipality of Detroit had a 2017 estimated population of 673,104, making it the 23rd-most populous city in the United States. The metropolitan area, known as Metro Detroit, is home to 4.3 million people, making it the second-largest in the Midwest after the Chicago metropolitan area. Regarded as a major cultural center, Detroit is known for its contributions to music and as a repository for art, architecture and design.

Contents

History

This company was founded by B F Everitt and W E Metzger with money they received from Studebaker when leaving the E-M-F Company in June, 1909. Chief engineer was William S. Kelly, who previously was responsible for the Wayne and E-M-F cars.

Studebaker former car manufacturer

Studebaker was an American automobile manufacturer based in South Bend, Indiana. Founded in 1852 and incorporated in 1868 as the Studebaker Brothers Manufacturing Company, the firm was originally a producer of wagons, buggies, carriages and harnesses. Studebaker continued to manufacture other diversified products after automobile production ceased in 1966.

E-M-F Company company

The E-M-F Company was an early American automobile manufacturer that produced automobiles from 1909 to 1912. The name E-M-F was gleaned from the initials of the three company founders: Barney Everitt, William Metzger, and Walter Flanders.

The car, a 30 hp four with a so-called "thiefproof" gear lever lock, was also built in Canada as the Tudhope. It was very similar to the E-M-F Thirty, and was produced without much mechanical changes through the whole time the company was active. The planned production run for the first model year was sold before actual building had begun. This Four-30 was joined by a larger Four-36 in 1911. Most sources name the engine in both series the same, so, the difference was in the longer wheelbase of the ladder car. One source gives a higher HP rating, but this would inevitably have changed its volume, as the A.L.A.M. rating is calculated from cylinder bore.

Canada Country in North America

Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Its southern border with the United States, stretching some 8,891 kilometres (5,525 mi), is the world's longest bi-national land border. Canada's capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver.

Tudhope is a surname.

Association of Licensed Automobile Manufacturers

The Association of Licensed Automobile Manufacturers (ALAM), originally the Manufacturer's Mutual Association (MMA), was an organization originally formed to challenge the litigation of the fledgling automobile industry by George B. Selden and the Electric Vehicle Company. Ultimately, the organization took advantage of its power and became Selden's greatest ally. In exchange for favorable royalty rates, the group gained the power to litigate and exclude other manufacturers from licensing, making them the most powerful group in the early automotive industry.

In 1912, a 6 cylinder model Six-48 was also offered, which at $ 1850 appears as a good buy.

When the last of the E-M-F founders, W E Flanders, also joined in 1913, the company was reorganized as the Flanders Motor Company. The only model offered was the improved 6 cylinder car, which got electric starter and lights, and a new name, Flanders Six-50. Both, car and new company, lasted only a few months. There is no connection to the Flanders Twenty built by E-M-F from 1910 until 1912.

Model overview

YearModelEngineRated powerWheelbase
in / cm
Body styleList price
1910Four-304 cyl.
238.8 c.i.
30 HP (A.L.A.M.)110 / 27902-pass. Runabout$ 1350
1910Four-304 cyl.
238.8 c.i.
30 HP (A.L.A.M.)110 / 27905-pass. Touring$ 1350
1911Four-304 cyl.
238.8 c.i.
30 HP (A.L.A.M.)110 / 27902-pass. Runabout$ 1500
1911Four-304 cyl.
238.8 c.i.
30 HP (A.L.A.M.)110 / 27905-pass. Touring$ 1350
1911Four-304 cyl.
238.8 c.i.
30 HP (A.L.A.M.)110 / 27905-pass. Fore-Door Touring$ 1400
1911Four-304 cyl.
238.8 c.i.
30 HP (A.L.A.M.)110 / 27904-pass. Coupe$ 1750
1911Four-364 cyl.
238.8 c.i.
30 HP (A.L.A.M.)115 / 29202-pass. Runabout$ 1500
1911Four-364 cyl.
238.8 c.i.
30 HP (A.L.A.M.)115 / 29205-pass. Touring$ 1500
1912Four-304 cyl.
238.8 c.i.
30 HP (A.L.A.M.)110 / 27902-pass. Runabout$ 1250
1912Four-304 cyl.
238.8 c.i.
30 HP (A.L.A.M.)110 / 27905-pass. Touring$ 1250
1912Four-364 cyl.
238.8 c.i.
30 HP (A.L.A.M.)115 / 29202-pass. Runabout$ 1500
1912Four-364 cyl.
238.8 c.i.
30 HP (A.L.A.M.)115 / 29205-pass. Touring$ 1500
1912Six-486 cyl.
358.1 c.i.
48 HP (A.L.A.M.)127 / 32302-pass. Runabout$ 1850
1912Six-486 cyl.
358.1 c.i.
48 HP (A.L.A.M.)127 / 32304-pass. Torpedo$ 1850
1912Six-486 cyl.
358.1 c.i.
48 HP (A.L.A.M.)127 / 32305-pass. Touring$ 1850
1912Six-486 cyl.
358.1 c.i.
48 HP (A.L.A.M.)127 / 32306-pass. Touring$ 1900


See also

Brass Era car

The Brass Era is an American term for the early period of automotive manufacturing, named for the prominent brass fittings used during this time for such things as lights and radiators. It is generally considered to encompass 1896 through 1915, a time when these vehicles were often referred to as horseless carriages.


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Waltham Manufacturing Company

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Pope-Toledo automobile manufacturer

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Stevens-Duryea

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The Anhut Motor Car Company was an American brass era automobile manufacturer, based in Detroit, Michigan, from 1909 until 1910.

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William Ernest Metzger was an automotive pioneer and salesman from Detroit. He opened one of the first automobile dealerships in the United States, and participated in the early development of a number of early automobile companies, including the Cadillac Automobile Company and the E-M-F Company, in which the "M" stands for his name.

The Success Automobile Manufacturing Company was a brass era United States automobile manufacturer, located at 532 De Ballviere Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri, in 1906.

Black Motor Company automobile manufacturer

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Jackson Automobile Company

The Jackson Automobile Company was an American Brass Era automobile manufacturer located in and named for Jackson, Michigan. The company produced the Jackson from 1903 to 1923, as well as the 1903 Jaxon steam car and the 1904 Orlo.

At least 2 cars named Richmond were produced. The first was a steam car made by the Richmond Automobile Company in Richmond, Indiana from 1902 to 1903. The second was a car built by the Wayne Works in Richmond, Indiana from 1904 to 1917.

There were at least three different cars called Pilot. There was a British car built 1909-1914 in London; a US car built 1909-1924 in Richmond, Indiana; and a German car built 1923-1925 in Werdau.

Flanders (automobile company) US-American automobile manufacturer

The Flanders Automobile Company was a short-lived US-American automobile manufacturer which operated in Detroit, Michigan, from 1910 to 1913.

Waltham Steam

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Rainier Motor Car Company company

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Atlas (Springfield automobile) automobile manufacturer in Massachusetts (1907-1913)

The Atlas car was built in Springfield, Massachusetts from 1907-1911.

References

David Burgess-Wise is a motoring author, enthusiast, and automobile historian.

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

Sources