Father O'Nine

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Father O'Nine
Directed by Roy Kellino
Produced by Ivor McLaren
Written byHarold G. Brown (from a story by)
Starring Hal Gordon
Dorothy Dewhurst
Claire Arnold
Cinematography Robert LaPresle
Edited by Reginald Beck
Production
company
Distributed byTwentieth Century Fox (UK)
Release date
  • 19 December 1938 (1938-12-19)(UK)
Running time
49 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
Language English

Father O'Nine is a 1938 British comedy film directed by Roy Kellino and starring Hal Gordon, Dorothy Dewhurst and Claire Arnold. [1] It was made at Wembley Studios as a quota quickie by the British subsidiary of Twentieth Century Fox. [2]

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References

  1. http://www.bfi.org.uk/films-tv-people/4ce2b6a9e7c0d
  2. Wood p.98

Bibliography