Henry, Earl of Atholl

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Henry of Atholl, the son of Maol Choluim (Gd: Eanraig mac Mhaoil Chaluim), was Mormaer of Atholl, Scotland, from sometime in the 1190s until his death in 1211. Henry had no sons, but did have at least two daughters - called Isabella and Forbhlaith. Before he died, Henry married off Isabella to Thomas, brother of the second most important man in Scotland, Alan, Lord of Galloway. Henry also married off Forbhlaith to Sir David de Hastings.

Máel Coluim of Atholl was Mormaer of Atholl between 1153/9 and the 1190s.

In early medieval Scotland, a mormaer was the Gaelic name for a regional or provincial ruler, theoretically second only to the King of Scots, and the senior of a Taoiseach (chieftain). Mormaers were equivalent to English earls or Continental counts, and the term is often translated into English as 'earl'.

Atholl historical division in the Scottish Highlands

Atholl or Athole is a large historical division in the Scottish Highlands, bordering Marr, Badenoch, Lochaber, Breadalbane, Strathearn, Perth, and Gowrie. Today it forms the northern part of Perth and Kinross, Scotland.

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Preceded by
Máel Coluim
Mormaer of Atholl
1190s-1211
Succeeded by
Isabella

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