Jody Clark

Last updated

Jody Clark
Born
Jody Clark

(1981-03-01) 1 March 1981 (age 41)
Lake District, Cumbria, England, United Kingdom
Nationality British
Education University of Central Lancashire
Occupation Engraver
Notable workThe final definitive coin portrait of Queen Elizabeth II Reverse of The Queen's Beasts (coin) bullion series
Website jodyclark.com

Jody Clark (born 1 March 1981) [1] is a British engraver formerly employed by the Royal Mint. He designed the fifth and final portrait of Queen Elizabeth II to feature on coins of the pound sterling, and that portrait was the fifth and final to feature on coins of the Australian dollar.

Contents

Career

Clark started his engraving career at the Arden Group with fellow experts Julian Homer and Christopher Nield.

Since he joined the Royal Mint in September 2012, Clark has worked on a number of projects including commemorative pieces which were given to attendees of the 2014 NATO Summit in Wales and medals struck to commemorate the 2014 Ryder Cup which took place at Gleneagles Hotel, Scotland. [2] He has also worked on commissions for Azerbaijan, Costa Rica, Lesotho and Tanzania. In 2014 a design by Clark was featured on the Britannia coin. [3] Prior to joining the Mint, Clark worked in commercial packaging design. [1]

In 2015 Clark's anonymous submission to a design competition was chosen to become the fifth definitive coin portrait of Elizabeth II to feature on British coins. [4] Clark was the first employee of the Royal Mint in over one hundred years to have designed such a portrait of the monarch. [1] At the age of 33 when his design was chosen, Clark was younger than any of the other four designers to have created portraits of Elizabeth II for British coinage at the time their design was chosen. [5] Uniquely, Clark's portrait of the Queen was created using computer-aided design software to turn his initial sketches into the required low-relief model, with no manual sculpting being used. [6] Production of coins bearing Clark's design began on 2 March 2015, and they appeared in circulation later in 2015. [4]

Personal life

Clark is originally from the Lake District in Cumbria. [7] In early 2015 he went on paternity leave following the birth of his first child. [1]

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Coins of the pound sterling</span> British current and historic coinage

The standard circulating coinage of the United Kingdom, British Crown Dependencies and British Overseas Territories is denominated in pennies and pounds sterling, and ranges in value from one penny sterling to two pounds. Since decimalisation, on 15 February 1971, the pound has been divided into 100 (new) pence. Before decimalisation, twelve pence made a shilling, and twenty shillings made a pound.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Britannia</span> National personification of the United Kingdom

Britannia is the national personification of Britain as a helmeted female warrior holding a trident and shield. An image first used in classical antiquity, the Latin Britannia was the name variously applied to the British Isles, Great Britain, and the Roman province of Britain during the Roman Empire. Typically depicted reclining or seated with spear and shield since appearing thus on Roman coins of the 2nd century AD, the classical national allegory was revived in the early modern period. On coins of the pound sterling issued by Charles II of England, Scotland, and Ireland, Britannia appears with her shield bearing the Union Flag. To symbolise the Royal Navy's victories, Britannia's spear became the characteristic trident in 1797, and a helmet was added to the coinage in 1825.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Twenty pence (British coin)</span> British decimal coin

The British decimal twenty pence coin is a denomination of sterling coinage worth 1/5 of a pound. Like the 50p coin, it is an equilateral curve heptagon. Its obverse has featured the profile of Queen Elizabeth II since the coin's introduction on 9 June 1982. Four different portraits of the Queen have been used; the latest design by Jody Clark was introduced in 2015. The second and current reverse, featuring a segment of the Royal Shield, was introduced in 2008.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Fifty pence (British coin)</span> British decimal coin; half of one pound sterling

The British decimal fifty pence coin is a denomination of sterling coinage worth one half of a pound. It is a seven-sided coin formed as an equilateral-curve heptagon, or Reuleaux polygon, a curve of constant width, meaning that the diameter is constant across any bisection. Its obverse has featured the profile of Queen Elizabeth II since the coin's introduction in 1969. Four different portraits of the Queen have been used, with the latest design by Jody Clark being introduced in 2015. The second and current reverse, featuring a segment of the Royal Shield, was introduced in 2008.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Five pence (British coin)</span> Coin of the United Kingdom

The British decimal five pence coin is a denomination of sterling coinage worth five one-hundredths of a pound. Its obverse has featured the profile of Queen Elizabeth II since the coin’s introduction on 23 April 1968, replacing the shilling in preparation for decimalisation in 1971. It remained the same size as the one shilling coin, which also remained legal tender, until a smaller version was introduced in June 1990 with the older coins being withdrawn on 31 December 1990. Four different portraits of the Queen have been used, with the latest design by Jody Clark being introduced in 2015. The second and current reverse, featuring a segment of the Royal Shield, was introduced in 2008.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ten pence (British coin)</span> British decimal coin

The British decimal ten pence coin is a denomination of sterling coinage worth one-tenth of a pound. Its obverse has featured the profile of Queen Elizabeth II since the coin's introduction in 1968, to replace the florin coin in preparation for decimalisation in 1971. It remained the same size as the florin coin until a smaller version was introduced 30 September 1992, with the older coins being withdrawn on 30 June 1993. Four different portraits of the Queen have been used on the coin; the latest design by Jody Clark was introduced in 2015. The second and current reverse, featuring a segment of the Royal Shield, was introduced in 2008.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Penny (British decimal coin)</span> Unit of currency equalling one-hundredth of a pound sterling

The British decimal one penny (1p) coin is a unit of currency and denomination of sterling coinage worth one-hundredth of one pound. Its obverse has featured the profile of Queen Elizabeth II since the coin's introduction on 15 February 1971, the day British currency was decimalised. Four different portraits of the Queen have been used on the obverse; the latest design by Jody Clark was introduced in 2015. The second and current reverse, designed by Matthew Dent, features a segment of the Royal Shield and was introduced in 2008. The penny is the lowest value coin ever to circulate in the United Kingdom.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Two pence (British decimal coin)</span> British decimal coin

The British decimal two pence coin is a denomination of sterling coinage equalling 2/100ths of a pound. Since the coin's introduction on 15 February 1971, the year British currency was decimalised, its obverse has featured four profiles of Queen Elizabeth II. In 2008 the design on its reverse changed from the original depiction of a plume ostrich feathers with a coronet to a segment of the Royal Shield.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Two pounds (British coin)</span> British coin denominating two pounds sterling

The British two pound (£2) coin is a denomination of sterling coinage. Its obverse has featured the profile of Queen Elizabeth II since the coin’s introduction. Three different portraits of the Queen have been used, with the current design by Jody Clark being introduced in 2015. The reverse design features Britannia.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">One pound (British coin)</span> British coin, denomination of the pound sterling

The British one pound (£1) coin is a denomination of sterling coinage. Its obverse bears the Latin engraving ELIZABETH II D G REG F D meaning, 'Elizabeth II, by the grace of God, Queen, Defender of the Faith'. It has featured the profile of Queen Elizabeth II since the original coin's introduction on 21 April 1983. Four different portraits of the Queen have been used, with the latest design by Jody Clark being introduced in 2015. The design on the reverse side of the current, 12-sided coin features four emblems to represent each of the nations of the United Kingdom — the English rose, the leek for Wales, the Scottish thistle, and the shamrock for Northern Ireland, also two or three oak leaves — emerging from a single 5-branched stem within a crown. In May 2022 the Royal Mint announced that the Kenyan-born artist Michael Armitage is designing a new £1 coin which will be issued in 2023 and will celebrate the "history of the UK in the 21st century".

<span class="mw-page-title-main">History of the British penny (1901–1970)</span> History of the pre-decimal British penny during the 20th century

The British penny, a large, pre-decimal coin which continued the series of pennies which began in about the year 700, was struck intermittently during the 20th century until its withdrawal from circulation after 1970. From 1901 to 1970, the obverse of the bronze coin depicted the monarch who was reigning at the start of the year. The reverse, which featured an image of Britannia seated with shield, trident, and helm, was created by Leonard Charles Wyon based on an earlier design by his father, William Wyon. The coins were also used in British colonies and dominions that had not issued their own coins.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Farthing (British coin)</span> Former coin of the United Kingdom and other territories

The British farthing historically abbreviated qua., was a denomination of sterling coinage worth 1/960 of one pound, 1/48 of one shilling, or 1/4 of one penny. It was minted in copper and later in bronze, and replaced the earlier English farthings.

Percy Metcalfe, CVO, RDI, was an English artist, sculptor and designer. He is recognised mostly for his coin designs and his contribution to the Ashtead Pottery Collection.

The British farthing was a British coin worth a quarter of an old penny. It ceased to be struck after 1956 and was demonetised from 1 January 1961.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Australian ten-cent coin</span> Current denomination of Australian currency

The Australian ten-cent coin (Dime) is a coin of the decimal Australian dollar. When the dollar was introduced as half of an Australian pound on 14 February 1966, the coin inherited the specifications of the pre-decimal shilling; both coins were worth one twentieth of a pound and were called "bob". On introduction it was the fourth-lowest denomination coin. Since the withdrawal from circulation of the one and two cent coins in 1992, it has been the second-lowest denomination coin in circulation.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Australian two-dollar coin</span> Current denomination of Australian currency

The Australian two-dollar coin is the highest-denomination coin of the Australian dollar. It was first issued on 20 June 1988, having been in planning since the mid-1970s. It replaced the Australian two-dollar note due to having a longer circulatory life. The only "mint set only" year was 1991.

The coins of Canada are produced by the Royal Canadian Mint and denominated in Canadian dollars ($) and the subunit of dollars, cents (¢). An effigy of the reigning monarch always appears on the obverse of all coins. There are standard images which appear on the reverse, but there are also commemorative and numismatic issues with different images on the reverse.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Humphrey Paget</span>

Thomas Humphrey Paget OBE was an English medal and coin designer and modeller. Paget's designs are indicated by the initials 'HP'.

The one hundred pound coin (£100) is a commemorative denomination of sterling coinage. Issued for the first time by the Royal Mint in 2015 and sold at face value, £100 coins hold legal tender status but are intended as collectors' items and are not found in general circulation. As of 1 November 2021, the silver content of each coin was worth about £35.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">The Queen's Beasts (coin)</span> Series of 10+1 British coins featuring Queen Elizabeth IIs heraldic beasts

TheQueen's Beasts coins are British coins issued by the Royal Mint in platinum, gold, and silver since 2016. Each of the 10 beast coins in the series features a stylized version of one of the heraldic Queen's Beasts statues present at the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II representing her royal line of ancestry. The silver coin is notable as the first two-ounce United Kingdom silver bullion coin. Engraver Jody Clark designed the entire series. In December 2016, a full line of proof-quality coins was announced. In 2017, the mint began producing a platinum version of the coin. In April 2021, the Royal Mint issued an eleventh "Completer Coin" that featured all 10 of the Queen's Beasts, taking the series to 11 coins in total. The April 2021 release included a "one of a kind" gold coin weighing 10kg and a denominated value of £10,000. Based upon the UK spot price at the time of release, the 10kg gold coin had an intrinsic scrap value of approximately £411,000. It was widely reported that the 10kg gold coin was the heaviest gold coin the Royal Mint had ever produced and that it had taken 400 hours to produce, four days to polish and has been described as a "Masterwork". The Royal Mint announced that Completer Coin completes the Queen’s Beasts commemorative collection.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Latest Queen Elizabeth coin unveiled". The Guardian. Retrieved 4 March 2015.
  2. "Interview with Jody Clark, Designer of the New Queen Elizabeth II Effigy". Coin Update . Retrieved 4 March 2015.
  3. "Behind the design: Britannia 2014". Royal Mint. Retrieved 4 March 2015.
  4. 1 2 "Royal Mint unveils new coinage portrait of the Queen". BBC News. Retrieved 4 March 2015.
  5. "Queen's new portrait for coins revealed by Royal Mint". The Telegraph. Retrieved 4 March 2015.
  6. "The fifth portrait of The Queen is unveiled". Royal Mint. Retrieved 4 March 2015.
  7. "The Queen's New Portrait For UK Coins Revealed". The Huffington Post. Retrieved 4 March 2015.
Preceded by Coins of the pound sterling
Obverse designer

2015
Succeeded by