Jurist

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Detail from the sarcophagus of Roman jurist Valerio Petroniano (315-320) Sarcofago avvocato Valerius Petrnianus-optimized.jpg
Detail from the sarcophagus of Roman jurist Valerio Petroniano (315–320)

A jurist is a person with expert knowledge of law; someone who analyses and comments on law. [1] [2] This person is usually a specialist legal scholarnot necessarily with a formal qualification in law or a legal practitioner, although in the United States the term "jurist" may be applied to a judge. [3] With reference to Roman law, a "jurist" (in English) is a jurisconsult (jurisconsulta). [4]

Contents

The English term jurist is to be distinguished from similar terms in other European languages, where it may be synonymous with legal professional , i.e. anyone with a professional law degree that qualifies for legal work.[ citation needed ]

A person who is a member of a jury is called a juror.

Notable jurists

Some notable historic jurists[ clarification needed ] include:

See also

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References

  1. Vieto Piergiovanni (2000). Comparative Studies in Continental and Anglo-American Legal History. Germany: Duncker & Humblot. p. 236. ISBN   978-3428097562.
  2. "One who professes or treats of law; one versed in the science of law; a legal writer": "Jurist". Oxford English Dictionary online. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  3. Garner, Bryan A., ed. (2019). "Jurist". Black's Law Dictionary (11 ed.). St. Paul, Minn.: West.
  4. "Definition of Jurisconsult". www.merriam-webster.com.