Let's Go Trippin'

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"Let's Go Trippin'"
Let's Go Trippin' (single).jpg
Single by Dick Dale and The Deltones
from the album Surfers' Choice
ReleasedSeptember 1961
Format Vinyl (7")
Recorded1961
Genre Surf rock [1]
Length2:10
Label Deltone
Songwriter(s) Dick Dale
Producer(s) Jim Monsour
Dick Dale and The Deltones singles chronology
"Ooh-Wee Marie"
(1961)
"Let's Go Trippin'"
(1961)
"Jungle Fever"
(1962)
Audio sample

"Let's Go Trippin'" is an instrumental by Dick Dale and The Del-Tones. It is often regarded as the first surf rock instrumental and is credited for launching the surf music craze. [1] First played in public in 1960 at the Rendezvous Ballroom in Balboa Peninsula, Newport Beach, California, it reached number 4 on the Los Angeles station KFWB, and later peaked at number 60 on the Billboard Hot 100.

An instrumental is a musical composition or recording without lyrics, or singing, although it might include some inarticulate vocals, such as shouted backup vocals in a Big Band setting. Through semantic widening, a broader sense of the word song may refer to instrumentals. The music is primarily or exclusively produced using musical instruments. An instrumental can exist in music notation, after it is written by a composer; in the mind of the composer ; as a piece that is performed live by a single instrumentalist or a musical ensemble, which could range in components from a duo or trio to a large Big Band, concert band or orchestra.

Dick Dale American surf rock guitarist

Richard Anthony Monsour, known professionally as Dick Dale, was an American rock guitarist. He was a pioneer of surf music, drawing on Middle Eastern music scales and experimenting with reverberation. Dale was known as "The King of the Surf Guitar", which was also the title of his second studio album.

Surf music is a subgenre of rock music associated with surf culture, particularly as found in Southern California. It was especially popular from 1962 to 1964 in two major forms. The first is instrumental surf, distinguished by reverb-drenched electric guitars played to evoke the sound of crashing waves, largely pioneered by Dick Dale and the Del-Tones. The second is vocal surf, which took elements of the original surf sound and added vocal harmonies, a movement led by the Beach Boys.

The song was used as the theme tune to the BBC Radio 4 programme Home Truths , originally presented by John Peel.[ citation needed ]

BBC Radio 4 British domestic radio station, owned and operated by the BBC

BBC Radio 4 is a radio station owned and operated by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) that broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. It replaced the BBC Home Service in 1967. The station controller is Gwyneth Williams, and the station is part of BBC Radio and the BBC Radio department. The station is broadcast from the BBC's headquarters at Broadcasting House, London. On 21 January 2019 Williams announced she was quitting the role. There are no details of when or who will be her replacement.

Home Truths was a weekly BBC Radio 4 programme which began on 11 April 1998 and was usually hosted by the DJ John Peel until his death in October 2004. In the Saturday 9 – 10 am slot, it gradually became one of Radio 4's most successful programmes.

John Peel English disc jockey, radio presenter, record producer and journalist

John Robert Parker Ravenscroft,, known professionally as John Peel, was an English disc jockey, radio presenter, record producer and journalist. He was the longest serving of the original BBC Radio 1 DJs, broadcasting regularly from 1967 until his death in 2004.

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References

  1. 1 2 Bogdanov et al. 2002, pp. 1313–1314.

Bibliography

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