List of storms named Ana

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The name Ana has been used for eleven tropical cyclones worldwide: eight in the Atlantic Ocean, one in the Central Pacific Ocean, one in the South Pacific, and one in the South-West Indian Ocean. It has also been used for one extratropical European windstorm.

In the Atlantic:

In the Central Pacific:

In the South Pacific:

In the South-West Indian:

In Europe:

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1997 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 1997 Atlantic hurricane season was a below-average season and is the most recent season to feature no tropical cyclones in August – typically one of the most active months. The season officially began on June 1, and lasted until November 30. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. The 1997 season was inactive, with only seven named storms forming, with an additional tropical depression and an unnumbered subtropical storm. It was the first time since the 1961 season that there were no active tropical cyclones in the Atlantic basin during the entire month of August. A strong El Niño is credited with reducing the number of storms in the Atlantic, while increasing the number of storms in the Eastern and Western Pacific basin to 19 and 26 storms, respectively. As is common in El Niño years, tropical cyclogenesis was suppressed in the tropical latitudes, with only two becoming tropical storms south of 25°N.

1968 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 1968 Atlantic hurricane season was one of five Atlantic hurricane seasons during the satellite era not to feature a major hurricane, the others being 1972, 1986, 1994, and 2013. The season officially began on June 1 and lasted until November 30, dates which conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. It was a below average season in terms of tropical storms, with a total of eight nameable storms. The first system, Hurricane Abby, developed in the northwestern Caribbean on June 1. Abby moved northward and struck Cuba, bringing heavy rainfall and flooding to western portions of the island. Making landfall in Florida on June 4, Abby caused flooding and spawned four tornadoes, but left behind little damage. Overall, the hurricane resulted in six deaths and about $450,000 (1968 USD) in damage. In late June, Tropical Storm Candy brought minor flooding and spawned several tornadoes across portions of the Southern United States. Overall damage from the cyclone reached approximately $2.7 million.

1979 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 1979 Atlantic hurricane season was the first season to include both male and female names, as well as the common six-year rotating lists of tropical cyclone names. The season officially began on June 1, and lasted until November 30. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. It was slightly below average, with nine systems reaching tropical storm intensity. The first system, an unnumbered tropical depression, developed north of Puerto Rico on June 9. Two days later, Tropical Depression One formed and produced severe flooding in Jamaica, with 40 deaths and about $27 million (1979 USD) in damage. Tropical Storm Ana caused minimal impact in the Lesser Antilles. Hurricane Bob spawned tornadoes and produced minor wind damage along the Gulf Coast of the United States, primarily in Louisiana, while the remnants caused flooding, especially in Indiana. Tropical Storm Claudette caused extensive flooding in Texas due to torrential rainfall, resulting in two deaths and about $750 million in damage.

The name Chris has been used for seven tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean.

2009 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 2009 Atlantic hurricane season was a below-average Atlantic hurricane season that produced eleven tropical cyclones, nine named storms, three hurricanes, and two major hurricanes. It officially began on June 1 and ended on November 30, dates that conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones develop in the Atlantic basin. The season's first tropical cyclone, Tropical Depression One, developed on May 28, while the final storm, Hurricane Ida, dissipated on November 10. The most intense hurricane, Bill, was a powerful Cape Verde-type hurricane that affected areas from the Leeward Islands to Newfoundland. The season featured the lowest number of tropical cyclones since the 1997 season, and only one system, Claudette, made landfall in the United States. Forming from the interaction of a tropical wave and an upper-level low, Claudette made landfall on the Florida Panhandle with maximum sustained winds of 45 mph (70 km/h) before quickly dissipating over Alabama. The storm killed two people and caused $228,000 in damage.

2021 Atlantic hurricane season Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean

The 2021 Atlantic hurricane season was the third-most active Atlantic hurricane season on record, producing 21 named storms and becoming the second season in a row – and third overall – in which the designated 21-name list of storm names was exhausted. Consequently, the season also became the sixth consecutive year with above-average tropical cyclone activity in terms of the number of named storms. Seven of those storms strengthened into a hurricane, four of which reached major hurricane intensity, which is just slightly above-average. The season officially began on June 1 and ended on November 30. These dates historically describe the period in each year when most Atlantic tropical cyclones form. However, subtropical or tropical cyclogenesis is possible at any time of the year, as demonstrated by Tropical Storm Ana's development on May 22, making 2021 the seventh and final consecutive year that a storm developed before the official beginning of a season.

Tropical cyclones in 2020 Tropical cyclones by year

During 2020, tropical cyclones formed within seven different tropical cyclone basins, located within various parts of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. During the year, 141 tropical cyclones formed in bodies of water known as tropical cyclone basins. Of these, 104, including three subtropical cyclones in the South Atlantic Ocean and three tropical-like cyclones in the Mediterranean, were named by various weather agencies when they attained maximum sustained winds of 35 knots. The strongest storm of the year was Typhoon Goni, peaking with a pressure of 905 hPa (26.72 inHg) and with 10-minute sustained winds of 220 km/h (140 mph). The deadliest storm of the year was Hurricane Eta which caused 175 fatalities and another 100+ to be missing in Central America and the US, while the costliest storm of the year was Hurricane Laura, with a damage cost around $19.1 billion in the Greater Antilles, The Bahamas, and the Gulf Coast of the United States.

Tropical cyclones in 1993 Tropical cyclone year

During 1993, tropical cyclones formed within seven different bodies of water called basins. To date, 110 tropical cyclones formed, of which 78 were given names by various weather agencies. Only one Category 5 tropical cyclone was formed in 1993.

Tropical cyclones in 2021 Tropical cyclone year

During 2021, tropical cyclones formed in seven major bodies of water, commonly known as tropical cyclone basins. Tropical cyclones will be assigned names by various weather agencies if they attain maximum sustained winds of 35 knots. During the year, 127 systems have formed and 91 were named, including one subtropical depression and excluding one system, which was unofficial. One storm was given two names by the same RSMC. The most intense storm of the year was Typhoon Surigae, with maximum 10-minute sustained wind speeds of 220 km/h (140 mph) and a minimum pressure of 895 hPa (26.43 inHg). The deadliest tropical cyclone was Typhoon Rai, which caused 410 fatalities in the Philippines and 1 in Vietnam, while the costliest was Hurricane Ida, which caused an estimated $75.25 billion USD in damage after striking Louisiana and the Northeastern United States. Six Category 5 tropical cyclones formed during the year, tying 2003.

Tropical cyclones in 2022 Tropical cyclone year

In 2022, tropical cyclones have formed in seven major bodies of water, commonly known as tropical cyclone basins. Tropical cyclones will be named by various weather agencies when they attain maximum sustained winds of 35 knots. So far, fifty-five systems have formed, of which twenty-eight were named. The strongest storm so far was Cyclone Batsirai, with maximum 10-minute sustained wind speeds of 195 km/h (120 mph) and a minimum pressure of 934 hPa (27.58 inHg). So far, the deadliest tropical cyclone of the year is Subtropical Depression Issa, having killed 435 in South Africa. Issa is also, so far, the costliest tropical cyclone of the year, amassing more than $1.57 billion in damages.