Luther Kent

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Luther Kent
LutherKent97.jpg
Luther Kent at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival
Background information
Birth nameKent Rowell
Also known asBig Luther, Duke Royal
Born (1948-06-23) June 23, 1948 (age 70)
Origin New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
Genres Blues, Rhythm and Blues, Gospel
Occupation(s)Singer
Instruments Vocals
Years active1962 - present
LabelsRenegade, Louisiana Red Hot, Vetter Communications
Associated actsTrick Bag, Blood, Sweat & Tears, The Dukes of Dixieland
Website LutherKent.com

Luther Kent (born June 23, 1948 [1] ) is an American blues singer based in New Orleans, Louisiana. Kent is known for a big soulful voice and his big horn-based group Luther Kent & Trick Bag that mixed swinging blues with New Orleans R&B.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Blues is a music genre and musical form which was originated in the Deep South of the United States around the 1870s by African Americans from roots in African musical traditions, African-American work songs, spirituals, and the folk music of white Americans of European heritage. Blues incorporated spirituals, work songs, field hollers, shouts, chants, and rhymed simple narrative ballads. The blues form, ubiquitous in jazz, rhythm and blues and rock and roll, is characterized by the call-and-response pattern, the blues scale and specific chord progressions, of which the twelve-bar blues is the most common. Blue notes, usually thirds, fifths or sevenths flattened in pitch, are also an essential part of the sound. Blues shuffles or walking bass reinforce the trance-like rhythm and form a repetitive effect known as the groove.

Singing act of producing musical sounds with the voice

Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice and augments regular speech by the use of sustained tonality, rhythm, and a variety of vocal techniques. A person who sings is called a singer or vocalist. Singers perform music that can be sung with or without accompaniment by musical instruments. Singing is often done in an ensemble of musicians, such as a choir of singers or a band of instrumentalists. Singers may perform as soloists or accompanied by anything from a single instrument up to a symphony orchestra or big band. Different singing styles include art music such as opera and Chinese opera, Indian music and religious music styles such as gospel, traditional music styles, world music, jazz, blues, gazal and popular music styles such as pop, rock, electronic dance music and filmi.

Contents

Biography

In 1948, Luther Kent was born Kent Rowell in New Orleans, Louisiana. [2] As a vocalist, he was influenced by artists such as Bobby Bland, Etta James, and Ray Charles. [3]

Bobby Bland American soul & blues musician

Robert Calvin Bland, known professionally as Bobby "Blue" Bland, was an American blues singer.

Etta James American singer

Etta James was an American singer who performed in various genres, including blues, R&B, soul, rock and roll, jazz and gospel. Starting her career in 1954, she gained fame with hits such as "The Wallflower", "At Last", "Tell Mama", "Something's Got a Hold on Me", and "I'd Rather Go Blind". She faced a number of personal problems, including heroin addiction, severe physical abuse, and incarceration, before making a musical comeback in the late 1980s with the album Seven Year Itch.

Ray Charles American musician

Ray Charles Robinson was an American singer, songwriter, musician, and composer. Among friends and fellow musicians he preferred being called "Brother Ray". He was often referred to as "The Genius". Charles started losing his vision at the age of 5, and by 7 he was blind.

Kent began to sing professionally when he was 14, and his first record was released by Montel Records. [4] In 1970, he became the lead singer for a group named Cold Grits. The group was subsequently signed to Ode Records, but their record was never released. [4] Kent joined Blood Sweat & Tears in 1974 and toured with them until the end of that same year. However, he never recorded with the group as he was still bound by contract with Ode Records at the time. [4]

Ode Sounds and Visuals was a record label, started by Lou Adler in 1967 after he sold Dunhill Records to ABC Records. It was distributed by CBS Records until 1969. Between 1970 and 1976 the label was distributed by A&M Records, from 1976 onward it was distributed by CBS subsidiary Epic.

In 1977, Kent released his first solo album, World Class, on RCS Records, produced by Cy Frost at Abbey Road Studios in St. John's Wood, London, and Applewood Studios in Colorado. In 1978, Kent and ex-Wayne Cochran musical director, Charlie Brent, formed Luther Kent & Trick Bag. [4] The band was active during the 1980s and 1990s, and released 3 CDs under the name.

Abbey Road Studios recording studio in London, England

Abbey Road Studios is a recording studio at 3 Abbey Road, St John's Wood, City of Westminster, London, England. It was established in November 1931 by the Gramophone Company, a predecessor of British music company EMI, which owned it until Universal Music took control of part of EMI in 2013.

Wayne Cochran American soul singer

Talvin Wayne Cochran was an American soul singer, known for his outlandish outfits and white pompadour hairstyle. He was sometimes referred to as The White Knight of Soul. Cochran is best known today for writing the song "Last Kiss", which he performed with the C.C. Riders.

Kent released a gospel album in 1996 teaming up with John Lee & the Heralds of Christ. The album also featured Allen Toussaint and Pete Fountain. Kent toured Italy in 2006 with Italian blues guitarist Robi Zonca and his band. The show was recorded and released as album Magic Box that year. [5]

Allen Toussaint American musician, composer and record producer

Allen Toussaint was an American musician, songwriter, arranger and record producer, who was an influential figure in New Orleans rhythm and blues from the 1950s to the end of the century, described as "one of popular music's great backroom figures". Many musicians recorded Toussaint's compositions, including "Java", "Mother-in-Law", "I Like It Like That", "Fortune Teller", "Ride Your Pony", "Get Out of My Life, Woman", "Working in the Coal Mine", "Everything I Do Gonna Be Funky", "Here Come the Girls", "Yes We Can Can", "Play Something Sweet", and "Southern Nights". He was a producer for hundreds of recordings, among the best known of which are "Right Place, Wrong Time", by his longtime friend Dr. John, and "Lady Marmalade", by Labelle.

Pete Fountain American clarinetist

Pierre Dewey LaFontaine Jr., known professionally as Pete Fountain, was an American jazz clarinetist.

Apart from his solo work, Kent also sings as a guest with the traditional jazz group, The Dukes of Dixieland on selected dates. Kent is also on some of their recordings.

Now, Kent hosts a radio show on WBRH in Baton Rouge, which airs Saturday afternoons from 4 to 6 called Luther’s House Party playing classic rhythm 'n' blues music.

Discography

Other projects

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