May Blitz

Last updated

May Blitz
OriginEngland
Genres Hard rock, psychedelic rock, progressive rock
Years active1969–1971
Labels Vertigo, Paramount
Past membersTerry Poole
Keith Baker
Jamie Black
Reid Hudson
Tony Newman

May Blitz was a Canadian-British psychedelic rock power trio that was active in the early 1970s.

Psychedelic rock Style of rock music

Psychedelic rock is a diverse style of rock music inspired, influenced, or representative of psychedelic culture, which is centred around perception-altering hallucinogenic drugs. The music is intended to replicate and enhance the mind-altering experiences of psychedelic drugs, most notably LSD. Many psychedelic groups differ in style, and the label is often applied spuriously.

Power trio

A power trio is a rock and roll band format having a lineup of electric guitar, bass guitar and drum kit, leaving out the second rhythm guitar or keyboard instrument that are used in other rock music bands that are quartets and quintets. Larger rock bands use one or more additional rhythm section to fill out the sound with chords and harmony parts.

The group was formed in 1969 by bassist Terry Poole and drummer Keith Baker, the rhythm section of the blues-rock trio Bakerloo, both of whom left the group when guitarist Clem Clempson departed to join Colosseum. Jamie Black joined the group on vocals and guitars but both Poole and Baker left the group before it recorded, Poole joining Vinegar Joe and Baker Uriah Heep. [1] Black then added fellow Canadian Reid Hudson on bass and Tony Newman, who had played with Jeff Beck, The Hollies and Sounds Incorporated, on drums.

Keith Baker is a drummer, best known for a brief stint with Uriah Heep. He played for Bakerloo, but left the group following the release of its only album. He subsequently became the first drummer of Supertramp between late 1969 and early 1970. Baker joined Uriah Heep prior to their second album Salisbury, replacing Nigel Olsson. He recorded the album with the group, but left when he did not want to tour extensively with the band and was replaced by Ian Clarke.

Clem Clempson English guitarist

David "Clem" Clempson is an English rock guitarist who has played as a member in a number of bands including Colosseum and Humble Pie.

Colosseum (band) British band

Colosseum were a pioneering English progressive jazz-rock band, mixing blues, rock and jazz-based improvisation.

After playing UK pubs, the group signed with Vertigo Records (in the US they were on Paramount Records [2] ) and released their debut album in 1970. [3] A second album followed in early 1971, but due to lack of commercial success the trio disbanded in late 1971. Black and Hudson, both originally from Canada, [4] returned to their native country while Newman joined Three Man Army, founded and led by the Gurvitz brothers, Adrian and Paul. [3]

Vertigo Records British record label

Vertigo Records is a record company, which originated in the United Kingdom. It was a subsidiary of the Philips/Phonogram record label, launched in 1969 to specialise in progressive rock and other non-mainstream musical styles. Today it is operated by Universal Music UK.

Paramount Records was a record label started in 1969 by Paramount Pictures after acquiring the rights to the name from George H. Buck. A previous Paramount Records, active between 1917 and 1932, had been unconnected to Paramount Pictures. The new Paramount label reissued pop releases by sister label Dot Records, which became a country label. It also released new albums from other pop musicians and soundtracks to Paramount films such as Paint Your Wagon, among others. Cast members of the Paramount Television series The Brady Bunch were signed, and the label issued several tie-in albums and singles.

Canada Country in North America

Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Canada's southern border with the United States, stretching some 8,891 kilometres (5,525 mi), is the world's longest bi-national land border. Its capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver. As a whole, Canada is sparsely populated, the majority of its land area being dominated by forest and tundra. Consequently, its population is highly urbanized, with over 80 percent of its inhabitants concentrated in large and medium-sized cities, with 70% of citizens residing within 100 kilometres (62 mi) of the southern border. Canada's climate varies widely across its vast area, ranging from arctic weather in the north, to hot summers in the southern regions, with four distinct seasons.

Discography


May Blitz is the self-titled debut album by British/Canadian power trio May Blitz. It was released in 1970 by Vertigo Records in the UK, and Paramount Records in the US.

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References

  1. May Blitz at MusicMight
  2. "May Blitz". Discogs.
  3. 1 2 May Blitz at Allmusic
  4. Burns, Alan. "Missing Lynx". Pacific Northwest Bands. Archived from the original on 22 November 2014. Retrieved 22 November 2014.