MedlinePlus

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MedlinePlus is an online information service produced by the United States National Library of Medicine. The service provides curated consumer health information in English and Spanish with select content in additional languages. [1] [2] The site brings together information from the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), other U.S. government agencies, and health-related organizations. There is also a site optimized for display on mobile devices, in both English and Spanish. In 2015, about 400 million people from around the world used MedlinePlus. [3] The service is funded by the NLM and is free to users.

Contents

MedlinePlus provides encyclopedic information on health and drug issues, and provides a directory of medical services. MedlinePlus Connect links patients or providers in electronic health record (EHR) systems to related MedlinePlus information on conditions or medications.

PubMed Health [4] is another NLM site that offers consumer health information, in addition to information for health professionals.

History

The National Library of Medicine has long provided programs and services for professional medical scientists and health care providers, including MEDLINE and the various services that access it, such as PubMed and Entrez. By the 1990s, more members of the general public were using these services as Internet access became widespread. [5] But nonprofessional users could benefit from reliable health information in a layperson-accessible format. [6] [7] [8] The National Library of Medicine introduced MedlinePlus in October 1998, to provide a non-commercial online service similar, for example, to the commercial WebMD. In 2010 another NCBI service, PubMed Health, complemented MedlinePlus in offering curated consumer health information; PubMed Health focuses especially on finding information about clinical effectiveness of treatments. [9]

MedlinePlus initially provided 22 health topics in English, which expanded to almost 1000 health topics in English and Spanish, plus links to health information in over 40 languages. MedlinePlus was recognized by the Medical Library Association for its role in providing health information. [10] The site scored 84 in the American Customer Satisfaction Index for 2010. [11]

In 2000s, A.D.A.M.'s medical encyclopedia was incorporated into MedlinePlus. The "Animated Dissection of Anatomy for Medicine, Inc." is a NASDAQ-traded public company based in Atlanta, Georgia, that provides consumer health information and benefits technology products to healthcare organizations, employers, consumers, and educational institutions.

Key Features

The MedlinePlus website provides information in text-based webpages as well as in videos and tools. [12] [13] Other ways to access to access MedlinePlus content include MedlinePlus Mobile, which is a point-of-care tool for clinicians, and MedlinePlus Connect, [14] which connects to Electronic Health Records (EHRs). [12]

Related Research Articles

MEDLINE is a bibliographic database of life sciences and biomedical information. It includes bibliographic information for articles from academic journals covering medicine, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, veterinary medicine, and health care. MEDLINE also covers much of the literature in biology and biochemistry, as well as fields such as molecular evolution.

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United States National Library of Medicine Worlds largest medical library

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PubMed Online database with abstracts of medical articles, hosted by US National Library of Medicine

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Entrez cross-database search engine, or web portal

The Entrez Global Query Cross-Database Search System is a federated search engine, or web portal that allows users to search many discrete health sciences databases at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) website. The NCBI is a part of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), which is itself a department of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which in turn is a part of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. The name "Entrez" was chosen to reflect the spirit of welcoming the public to search the content available from the NLM.

Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a comprehensive controlled vocabulary for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences. It serves as a thesaurus that facilitates searching. Created and updated by the United States National Library of Medicine (NLM), it is used by the MEDLINE/PubMed article database and by NLM's catalog of book holdings. MeSH is also used by ClinicalTrials.gov registry to classify which diseases are studied by trials registered in ClinicalTrials.

A personal health record (PHR) is a health record where health data and other information related to the care of a patient is maintained by the patient. This stands in contrast to the more widely used electronic medical record, which is operated by institutions and contains data entered by clinicians to support insurance claims. The intention of a PHR is to provide a complete and accurate summary of an individual's medical history which is accessible online. The health data on a PHR might include patient-reported outcome data, lab results, and data from devices such as wireless electronic weighing scales or from a smartphone.

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eMedicine is an online clinical medical knowledge base founded in 1996 by Scott Plantz MD FAAEM, Jonathan Adler MD MS FACEP FAAEM, a computer engineer Jeffrey Berezin MS. The fundamental concept was to create a large repository of professional level medical content that could be both updated and accessed continuously to assist in clinical care and physician education. The eMedicine website consists of approximately 6,800 medical topic review articles, each of which is associated with one of 62 clinical subspecialty "textbooks". Pediatrics, for example, has 1,050 articles organized into 14 subspecialty "textbooks" ; the emergency medicine volume has 630 articles and internal medicine is near 1,400. If the remainder of the specialty textbooks are added to the total 6800+ articles were created in eMedicine. In addition, the knowledge base includes over 25,000 clinically multimedia files. To create this online content over 11,000 board certified healthcare specialists were recruited and managed in a first generation, proprietary learning management system (LMS). To provide some perspective on the amount of content that was created it is estimated that, if hard-copy printed out, it would total over 1 million pages.

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References

  1. "Medlineplus.gov en español" (in Spanish).
  2. "Health Information in Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus". medlineplus.gov. Retrieved 2019-10-22.
  3. "MedlinePlus Statistics". National Institutes of Health.
  4. National Library of Medicine, PubMed Health.
  5. Naomi Miller, M.L.S., Systems Librarian, Eve-Marie Lacroix, M.S., Chief, Public Services Division, and Joyce E. B. Backus, M.S.L.S., Systems Librarian (January 2000). "MEDLINEplus: building and maintaining the National Library of Medicine's consumer health Web service". Bulletin of the Medical Library Association (BMLA). 88 (1): 11–7. PMC   35193 . PMID   10658959.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  6. Marill JL, Miller N, Kitendaugh P (January 2006). "The MedlinePlus public user interface: studies of design challenges and opportunities". Journal of the Medical Library Association. 94 (1): 30–40. PMC   1324769 . PMID   16404467.
  7. Miller N, Lacroix EM, Backus J (Mar–Apr 2001). "The making of Medlineplus". Public Libraries. 40 (2): 111–3.
  8. Miller N, Tyler RJ, Backus JE (Fall 2004). "MedlinePlus: The National Library of Medicine brings quality information to health consumers" (PDF). Library Trends. 53 (2): 375–88. Retrieved 2009-06-08.
  9. Miles, Alisha (July 2011), "PubMed Health", J Med Libr Assoc, 99 (3): 265–266, doi:10.3163/1536-5050.99.3.018, PMC   3133896 .
  10. "Thomson Reuters/Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award". Medical Library Association. Retrieved 5 August 2016.
  11. "ACSI Scores for U.S. Federal Government". The American Customer Satisfaction Index. 2010.
  12. 1 2 Schnall, Janet G.; Fowler, Susan (September 2013). "MedlinePlus.gov: quality health information for your patients". The American Journal of Nursing. 113 (9): 64–65. doi:10.1097/01.NAJ.0000434180.83352.f0. ISSN   1538-7488. PMID   23985609.
  13. "Videos & Tools: MedlinePlus". medlineplus.gov. Retrieved 2019-10-22.
  14. "MedlinePlus Connect: Linking Patient Portals and Electronic Health Records to Health Information". medlineplus.gov. Retrieved 2019-10-22.