Murder book

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In law enforcement parlance, the term murder book refers to the case file of a murder investigation. Typically, murder books include crime scene photographs and sketches, autopsy and forensic reports, transcripts of investigators' notes, and witness interviews. The murder book encapsulates the complete paper trail of a murder investigation, from the time the murder is first reported through the arrest of a suspect.

Contents

Law enforcement agencies typically guard murder books carefully, and it is unusual for civilians to be given unfettered access to these kinds of records, especially for unsolved cases.

In modern culture

In films and television

In literature and publications

American crime novelist Michael Connelly makes regular references to the meticulous murder books kept by LAPD detective Harry Bosch, particularly in The Black Echo , The Concrete Blonde , The Last Coyote , Trunk Music , The Closers , and The Drop . In 2020 Connelly created a true crime podcast titled Murder Book.

Novelist Lisa Gray makes regular references to murder books in her Jessica Shaw novels.

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References

  1. TV.com (2007-03-16). "Law & Order: Murder Book". TV.com. Retrieved 2014-03-07.
  2. "Murder Book: Thursday 10/9C". Investigation Discovery. Retrieved December 23, 2015.
  3. Murder Book on IMDb