Law enforcement

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Lieutenant debriefing New York City Police Department (NYPD) officers at Times Square. The NYPD is the largest police force in the United States, with a uniformed force of almost 35,000 officers as of 2021. 5.29.10NYPDByLuigiNovi6.jpg
Lieutenant debriefing New York City Police Department (NYPD) officers at Times Square. The NYPD is the largest police force in the United States, with a uniformed force of almost 35,000 officers as of 2021.
U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers boarding a ship CBP female officers going aboard a ship.jpg
U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers boarding a ship
Indonesian National Police officers during foot patrol Polisi patroli.jpg
Indonesian National Police officers during foot patrol

Law enforcement is the activity of some members of government who act in an organized manner to enforce the law by discovering, deterring, rehabilitating, or punishing people who violate the rules and norms governing that society. [1] The term encompasses police, courts, and corrections.

Contents

Modern state legal codes use the term peace officer, or law enforcement officer, to include every person vested by the legislating state with police power or authority, traditionally, anyone "sworn or badged, who can arrest any person for a violation of criminal law, is included under the umbrella term of law enforcement.

Although law enforcement may be most concerned with the prevention and punishment of crimes, organizations exist to discourage a wide variety of non-criminal violations of rules and norms, effected through the imposition of less severe consequences such as probation.

Organizations

Most law enforcement is conducted by some type of law enforcement agency, with the most typical agency fulfilling this role being the police. Social investment in enforcement through such organizations can be massive, both in terms of the resources invested in the activity, and in the number of people professionally engaged to perform those functions. [2]

Law enforcement agencies tend to be limited to operating within a specified jurisdiction. In some cases, jurisdiction may overlap in between organizations; for example, in the United States, each state has its own statewide law enforcement arms, but the Federal Bureau of Investigation is able to act against certain types of crimes occurring in any state. Various specialized segments of society may have their own internal law enforcement arrangements. For example, military organizations may have military police.

See also

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Crime Illegal behavior defined by existing criminal law

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Police Law enforcement body

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Law enforcement by country

In many countries, particularly those with a federal system of government, there may be several law enforcement agencies, police or police-like organizations, each serving different levels of government and enforcing different subsets of the applicable law.

The following outline is provided as an overview of and introduction to law enforcement:

Security guard

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The Criminal Investigations Division conducts investigations in support of the department's civil, criminal, and administrative cases. These investigations involve such areas as homeland security; Internet crimes against children; high technology computer crimes; drug nuisance abatement; environmental crimes; tobacco tax enforcement; airport, harbors, and highways; cold homicide cases; and other criminal and civil matters.

References

  1. New Law Journal - Volume 123, Part 1 - Page 358, 1974
  2. Kären M. Hess, Christine Hess Orthmann, Introduction to Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice (2008), p. 1.