Museum of Vertebrate Zoology

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Coordinates: 37°52′16″N122°15′43″W / 37.87111°N 122.26194°W / 37.87111; -122.26194

Museum of Vertebrate Zoology
Museum of Vertebrate Zoology
Established1908
LocationUniversity of California, Berkeley
TypeScience museum
Collection size640,000+ specimens
Visitorsresearch only
DirectorMichael Nachman
CuratorRauri Bowie (Birds),
Jimmy A McGuire (Herpetology),
Eileen Lacey (Mammals)
Website Museum of Vertebrate Zoology Main Page

The Museum of Vertebrate Zoology is a natural history museum at the University of California, Berkeley. The museum was founded by philanthropist Annie Montague Alexander in 1908. Alexander recommended zoologist Joseph Grinnell as museum director, a position he held until his death in 1939. [1]

The museum became a center of authority for the study of vertebrate biology and evolution on the West Coast, comparable to other major natural history museums in the United States. [1]

It has one of the nation's largest research collections of mammals, birds, amphibians and reptiles, and the largest collection of any university museum. [2] [3] The museum is located on the UC Berkeley campus, in the Valley Life Sciences Building, on the 3rd floor, entrance at room 3101.

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