Non-affiliated members of the House of Lords

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Members of the House of Lords are said to be non-affiliated if they do not belong to any parliamentary group. That is, they do not take a political party's whip, nor affiliate to the crossbench group, nor the Lords Spiritual (bishops). Formerly, the Lords of Appeal in Ordinary were also a separate affiliation, but their successors (the Justices of the Supreme Court) are now disqualified from the Lords while in office and are described as "Ineligible" rather than "Non-affiliated". [1]

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Most non-party Lords Temporal are crossbenchers. Members with senior official roles are counted as non-affiliated while they hold them, to preserve their neutrality; they may (re-)affiliate to a group at the end of their term of office. Some members become non-affiliated after resigning or being expelled from a party, either through a political disagreement or after a scandal such as the 2009 parliamentary expenses scandal. Others have had no party allegiance and choose this designation rather than joining the crossbench. [2]

Although the Lord Speaker must drop any party affiliation upon their election, [3] they are not considered as a non-affiliated peer.

List of Non-affiliated Peers

The UK Parliament website lists the following "Non-affiliated" members of the House of Lords, [4] [5] excluding those on leave of absence or suspended: [1]

MemberPrevious affiliationReason for change
Lord Ahmed LabourResigned following allegation of antisemitism[ citation needed ]
Lord Archer of Weston-Super-Mare ConservativeExpelled following imprisonment for perjury[ citation needed ]
Baroness Ashton of Upholland Labour
Lord Bhatia CrossbenchFollowing return from suspension from the House in connection with expenses scandal
Lord Boswell of Aynho ConservativePrincipal Deputy Chairman of Committees (2012–present)
Lord Carter of Barnes Labour
Lord Cashman LabourLeft Labour Party to support the Liberal Democrats in the 2019 European Parliament elections [6]
Lord Cooper of Windrush ConservativeSuspended from party whip after expressing support for Liberal Democrats in 2019 European Parliament elections
Lord Darzi of Denham LabourResigned from party whip in July 2019 in protest of the party's response to antisemitism complaints [7]
Lord Davies of Abersoch Labour
Lord Eatwell Labour
Lord Elis-Thomas Plaid Cymru
Baroness Falkner of Margravine Liberal Democrat
Lord Faulks Conservative
Lord Gadhia Conservative
Lord Green of Hurstpierpoint Conservative
Lord Hanningfield ConservativeBriefly suspended from the House following criminal conviction for false accounting[ citation needed ]
Lord Heseltine ConservativeSuspended from party whip after expressing support for Liberal Democrats in 2019 European Parliament elections
Lord Holmes of Richmond Conservative
Lord Inglewood ConservativeExcepted hereditary peer elected to Lords by Conservative hereditary peers
Lord Kalms ConservativeExpelled after supporting UKIP in 2009 European elections
Earl of Kinnoull CrossbenchExcepted hereditary peer elected to Lords by Crossbench hereditary peers
Lord Lea of Crondall LabourSuspended from party whip due to misconduct [8]
Lord Lupton Conservative
Lord McFall of Alcluith Labour Senior Deputy Speaker of the House of Lords (2016–present)
Lord Mackenzie of Framwellgate LabourFollowing return from suspension from the House in connection with lobbying scandal[ citation needed ]
Lord Mann LabourPreviously a Labour MP
Lord Moonie LabourResigned from party whip following suspension by party over accusations of transphobia [ citation needed ]
Duke of Norfolk Crossbench Earl Marshal
Earl of Oxford and Asquith Liberal DemocratExcepted hereditary peer elected to Lords by whole House vote
Lord Patel of Bradford Labour
Lord Paul LabourFollowing return from suspension from the House in connection with expenses scandal[ citation needed ]
Lord Pearson of Rannoch UK IndependenceResigned from party whip in protest of party leadership during Brexit negotiations [9]
Lord Prior of Brampton Conservative
Baroness Ritchie of Downpatrick Social Democratic
and Labour Party
Withdrew from SDLP due to party policy regarding House of Lords [10]
Earl of Selborne Conservative
Lord Smith of Finsbury Labour
Lord Stone of Blackheath LabourSuspended from party whip due to misconduct [11]
Baroness Stowell of Beeston Conservative
Lord Taylor of Warwick ConservativeFollowing return from suspension from the House in connection with expenses scandal and imprisonment for false accounting[ citation needed ]
Baroness Tonge Liberal DemocratResigned from party whip in 2012 after Israeli Apartheid Week comments[ citation needed ]
Lord Triesman LabourResigned from party whip in July 2019 in protest of the party's response to antisemitism complaints [7]
Lord Turnberg LabourResigned from party whip in July 2019 in protest of the party's response to antisemitism complaints [7]
Lord Tyrie ConservativeEntered the House without affiliation due to his role as Chairman of the Competition and Markets Authority
Baroness Uddin LabourFollowing return from suspension from the House in connection with expenses scandal[ citation needed ]
Duke of Wellington ConservativeExcepted hereditary peer elected to Lords by Conservative hereditary peers
Baroness Wheatcroft Conservative
Lord Willoughby de Broke UKIPExcepted hereditary peer elected to Lords by Conservative hereditary peers

Also previously switched affiliation to UK Independence Party

Baroness Wolf of Dulwich Crossbench

List of Independent Peers

There are other members listed with an "Independent" designation within the House of Lords: [4] [5]

MemberDesignationNotes
Baroness Blackstone Labour IndependentPreviously sat as a Labour peer
Lord Maginnis of Drumglass Independent Ulster UnionistResigned whip following homophobic remarks [12]
Lord Owen Independent Social DemocratLeft the Crossbench following a donation to Labour [13]
Lord Stevens of Ludgate Conservative IndependentPreviously sat as a UKIP peer
Lord Stoddart of Swindon Independent LabourExpelled after supporting a Socialist Alliance candidate in the 2001 general election [ citation needed ]
Lord Truscott Independent LabourResigned following the "cash for influence" allegations of 2009[ citation needed ]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "Ineligible members of the House of Lords". UK Parliament .
  2. "The party system". UK Parliament. MPs and Members of the Lords do not have to belong to a political party. Instead, MPs can sit as Independents and Lords can sit as Crossbenchers or Independents.
  3. "The Lord Speaker". UK Parliament.
  4. 1 2 "Lords by party and type of peerage". UK Parliament.
  5. 1 2 "Members of the House of Lords". UK Parliament.
  6. https://www.birminghammail.co.uk/black-country/michael-cashman-sensationally-quits-labour-16311445
  7. 1 2 3 "Three Labour peers quit over handling of antisemitism cases". The Guardian. 9 July 2019.
  8. "Labour suspends Lord Lea of Crondall over 'stalker' behavior". The Times (UK). 14 January 2020.
  9. "Former UKIP Leader Lord Pearson Resigns From Party". Politicalite. 27 October 2019.
  10. "Margaret Ritchie quits SDLP to become peer". BBC. 10 September 2019.
  11. "Labour peer suspended over sexual harassment and transphobia". The Guardian. 23 October 2019.
  12. ""Party distances itself from Maginnis gay marriage remarks"". BBC News. 13 June 2012. Retrieved 29 December 2016.
  13. Eaton, George (2 March 2014). "David Owen joins Miliband's big tent with donation to Labour of more than £7,500". New Statesman. Retrieved 30 December 2016.