Playing period

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Playing period is a division of time in a sports or games, in which play occurs. [1] Many games are divided into a fixed number of periods, which may be named for the number of divisions. Other games use terminology independent of the total number of divisions. A playing period may have a fixed length of game time or be bound by other rules of the game.

Contents

Description

The playing period is a division of time in a sports or games, in which play occurs. [1] Many games are divided into a fixed number of periods, which may be named for the number of divisions (e.g., a half or a quarter). Other games use terminology independent of the total number of divisions (e.g., sets or innings). A playing period may have a fixed length of game time or be bound by other rules (e.g., three outs in baseball or a sudden-death goal in overtime).

Common periods

Halves and quarters

Basketball and gridiron football are among the sports that are divided into two halves, which may be subdivided into two quarters. A fifth overtime "quarter" may be played in the event of a tie at the end of the fourth quarter.

Periods

Floorball and ice hockey games are typically divided into three periods. A fourth period of overtime may be played in the event of a tie at the end of the third period.

Innings

Cricket and baseball games are divided into innings . In baseball, each inning consists of each team batting until three players on the team are out. Additional innings may be played if the game is tied after the ninth or subsequent innings.

Ends

Curling contests consist of a number of ends, where each player on each team throws all of their stones.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "playing period | Definition of playing period by Webster's Online Dictionary". www.webster-dictionary.org. Retrieved 2017-02-17.