Raising of the son of the woman of Shunem

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Elisha raises son of the woman of Shunem, Benjamin West, 1765. Elisha raises son BenjaminWest.jpg
Elisha raises son of the woman of Shunem, Benjamin West, 1765.

The raising of the son of the woman of Shunem is a miracle by Elisha recorded in the Hebrew Bible, 2 Kings 4.

Elisha Biblical Prophet who came after Elijah

Elisha was, according to the Hebrew Bible, a prophet and a wonder-worker. Also mentioned in the New Testament and the Quran, Elisha is venerated as a prophet in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Amongst new religious movements, Bahá'í writings refer to him by name. His name is commonly transliterated into English as Elisha via Hebrew, Eliseus via Greek and Latin, or Alyasa via Arabic, and Elyesa via Turkish. He is said to have been a disciple and protégé of Elijah, and after Elijah was taken up in a chariot of fire, accepted as the leader of the sons of the prophets.

2 Kings 4: 32 When Elisha came into the house, he saw the child lying dead on his bed. 33 So he went in and shut the door behind the two of them and prayed to the Lord. 34 Then he went up and lay on the child, putting his mouth on his mouth, his eyes on his eyes, and his hands on his hands. And as he stretched himself upon him, the flesh of the child became warm. 35 Then he got up again and walked once back and forth in the house, and went up and stretched himself upon him. The child sneezed seven times, and the child opened his eyes.

The story begins at 2 Kings 4:8, and is demarcated from the previous story by Elisha's arrival in Shunem, and by a change in heroine — from the widow of the son of the prophets (4:1-7) to the rich woman of Shunem. [1]

Shunem was a small village mentioned in the Bible. It was located in the possession of the Tribe of Issachar, near the Jezreel Valley and south of Mount Gilboa.

Woman of Shunem

The woman of Shunem is a character in the Hebrew Bible. 2 Kings 4:8 describes her as a "great woman" (KJV) in the town of Shunem. Her name is not recorded in the biblical text.

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References

  1. Uriel Simon Reading Prophetic Narratives 1997 Page 227 "There is no doubt that the story begins at 2 Kings 4:8, since it is demarcated from the previous story by three clear signs: change of place — Elisha's arrival in Shunem; change in heroine — from the widow of the son of the prophets to the grande dame of Shunem, and by change of genre."