Ruth Metzler

Last updated
Ruth Metzler
Portrait Ruth Metzler-Arnold.jpg
Vice President of Switzerland
In office
1 January 2003 31 December 2003
President Pascal Couchepin
Preceded by Pascal Couchepin
Succeeded by Samuel Schmid
Minister of Justice and Police
In office
1 January 1999 31 December 2003
Preceded by Arnold Koller
Succeeded by Christoph Blocher
Member of the Swiss Federal Council
In office
1 January 1999 31 December 2003
Preceded by Arnold Koller
Succeeded by Christoph Blocher
Personal details
Born (1964-05-23) 23 May 1964 (age 55)
Sursee, Switzerland
Political party Christian Democratic People's Party
Spouse(s)
  • Lukas Metzler
    (m. 1991;div. 2010)
    [1]
  • Stephan Zimmermann(m. 2015)
    [1]
Alma mater University of Fribourg

Ruth Metzler-Arnold (born 23 May 1964) is a Swiss politician and former member of the Swiss Federal Council (1999–2003).

She was elected to the Swiss Federal Council on 11 March 1999, as a member of the Christian Democratic People's Party from the Canton of Appenzell Innerrhoden. During her time in office she headed the Federal Department of Justice and Police. She won 14 referendums during her time in office.

On 10 December 2003, she became the third member of the council not to be reelected in the history of the Swiss Federal State. In the 2003 Federal Assembly elections, her party lost many voters and the Swiss People's Party became the largest party of Switzerland. The Swiss People's party then requested another seat in the Federal Council. In the elections for the Federal Council on 10 December, the Federal Assembly did not re-elect Ruth Metzler and elected Christoph Blocher instead, by 121 votes to 116 on the third round of voting. She challenged her CVP colleague Joseph Deiss for his seat, but lost by 138 to 96. Metzler kept her seat until the end of the year and Christoph Blocher succeeded her on 1 January 2004.

She published the memories of those years under the title "Grissini & Alpenbitter", 2004, ISBN   3-85882-388-0.

She taught between February 2004 and July 2004 at the University of St. Gallen a class called "Gestaltungsmöglichkeiten in der Politik" which can be translated as "scope for design in politics". Since April 2005 she has been working for the Swiss pharmaceutical company Novartis.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Sie sagte Ja zu ihrem Banker" [She said yes to her banker]. Blick (in German). 3 August 2015. Archived from the original on 5 August 2015. Retrieved 29 October 2019.
Political offices
Preceded by
Arnold Koller
Member of the Swiss Federal Council
1999–2003
Succeeded by
Christoph Blocher
Minister of Justice and Police
1999–2003
Preceded by
Pascal Couchepin
Vice President of Switzerland
2003
Succeeded by
Samuel Schmid