Secretary of State for the Provinces

Last updated
Secretary of State for the Provinces
Member of Cabinet of Canada
FormationJuly 1, 1867
First holder Adams George Archibald
Final holder Thomas Nicholson Gibbs
AbolishedJune 30, 1873

Secretary of State for the Provinces was an office in the Cabinet of Canada, active from 1867 to 1873. The office was superseded by the Minister of the Interior on May 3, 1873.

Contents

The position was responsible for managing the responsibilities and inter-governmental links between the federal government and the provincial counterparts. The post replaced that of the Secretary of State for the Colonies in Britain and that of the Provincial Secretary or Colonial Secretary within the former British colonies of British North America (see Provincial Secretary of Upper Canada, Provincial Secretary of Lower Canada, United Provinces of Canada)

Ministers

   Liberal-Conservative Party
No.PortraitNameTerm of officePolitical partyMinistry
1 Adams George Archibald.jpg Sir Adams George Archibald July 1, 1867April 30, 1868 Liberal-Conservative 1 (Macdonald)
2 Joseph Howe 1.jpg Joseph Howe November 16, 1869May 6, 1873Liberal-Conservative
James Cox Aikins.jpg James Cox Aikins
(Acting)
May 7, 1873June 13, 1873Liberal-Conservative
3 ThomasNicholsonGibbs23.jpg Thomas Nicholson Gibbs June 14, 1873June 30, 1873Liberal-Conservative

See also

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