South Australian Football Hall of Fame

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The South Australian Football Hall of Fame awards were created in 2002 to recognise the players, coaches, umpires, administrators and journalists who had made a significant contribution in the South Australian National Football League (SANFL). [1] To be eligible for hall of fame award a player must have been retired from football for at least three years.

Contents

2002

113 inductees:

2003

10 inductees:

2004

10 inductees:

2005

Eight inductees:

2006

Eight inductees: [2]

2007

10 inductees: [3]

2008

Five inductees: [4]

2010

Eight inductees: [5]

2012

Eleven inductees: [6]

2014

Ten inductees:

2015

Five inductees: [7]

2016

Five inductees: [8]

2018

Three inductees: [9]

2019

Three inductees: [10]

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References

  1. Hall of Fame page on official SANFL website
  2. The Advertiser , "A grateful state says thanks", 15 August 2006
  3. Sydney Morning Herald , "Bickley enters SA's footy Hall of Fame", 15 August 2007
  4. Weekly Times Messenger , "Legends make their way to the great hall" Archived 16 August 2008 at the Wayback Machine , 13 August 2008
  5. ABC News , "Francou and Sanders join Hall of Fame", 6 August 2010
  6. FIVEaa , "SA Football Hall of Fame" Archived 31 October 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  7. Rucci, Michaelangelo (7 September 2015). "SANFL recognises five greats from SA football's era of massive change with Hall of Fame honour". News Corporation. The Advertiser. Retrieved 12 September 2015.
  8. http://sanfl.com.au/south-australian-football-hall-of-fame-2/
  9. Rucci, Michelangelo (5 September 2018). "Peter "Milky" Vivian, Darren Smith and Harry Kernahan make up the Class of 2018 in the SA Football Hall of Fame". The Advertiser. Retrieved 11 September 2019.
  10. Milbank, Zac. "2019 West End Hall of Fame Inductees". SANFL. Retrieved 10 September 2019.