St. James Canadians

Last updated
St. James Canadians
St James Canadians.png
City Winnipeg, Manitoba
League Manitoba Junior Hockey League
Operated 1956-2004
Home arena St. James Civic Centre
Colours Red, Blue, White
            
Championships 1959 Memorial Cup Champions
Franchise history
1956–1966 Winnipeg Braves
1966-1967 St. James Braves
1967-2003 St. James Canadians

The St. James Canadians were a Canadian junior hockey team in the Manitoba Junior Hockey League until 2003, folding officially in 2004. The Canadians played out of the St. James Civic Centre, in Winnipeg, Manitoba. As the Winnipeg Braves, they won the 1959 Memorial Cup as National Junior Hockey champions.

Manitoba Junior Hockey League

The Manitoba Junior Hockey League (MJHL) is a Junior 'A' ice hockey league operating in the Canadian province of Manitoba and one of eleven member leagues of the Canadian Junior Hockey League (CJHL).

St. James-Assiniboia, Winnipeg Place in Manitoba, Canada

St. James-Assiniboia is a major district in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Located in the far western part of the city, it is bounded on the north by the Rural Municipality of Rosser and the Canadian National Railway's Oak Point line, on the south by the Assiniboine River, on the west by the Rural Municipality of Headingley, and on the east by the Canadian Pacific Railway's La Riviere line.

Winnipeg Provincial capital city in Manitoba, Canada

Winnipeg is the capital and largest city of the province of Manitoba in Canada. Centred on the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine rivers, it is near the longitudinal centre of North America, approximately 110 kilometres (70 mi) north of the Canada–United States border.

Contents

History

Winnipeg Braves

The Winnipeg Braves were founded in 1956 and affiliated with the Winnipeg Warriors (minor pro) of the Western Hockey League (minor pro). The Braves played regular season games at Winnipeg's Olympic Rink and won 2 Turnbull Cup Championships as Manitoba Junior Champions (1959 and 1965).

Winnipeg Warriors (minor pro)

The Winnipeg Warriors were a minor league hockey team that played in the Western Hockey League from 1955 to 1961. Owned by Winnipeg's prominent Perrin family, the Warriors represented the return of professional hockey to Winnipeg after a 27-year absence. In 1955, the Warriors Club was the first tenant in the brand-new Winnipeg Arena. The grand opening of Winnipeg Arena occurred on October 18, 1955, during the Warriors' WHL season opening game against the Calgary Stampeders (hockey) club. The ceremonial faceoff, conducted by John Draper Perrin, Sr., President of the Warriors, occurred before a standing room crowd of 9,671 fans, the largest in WHL history. Captained by Fred Shero and including players such as Hockey Hall of Fame member Bill Mosienko, as well as Eric Nesterenko, Danny Summers, Gary Aldcorn, Cec Hoekstra, Fred Burchell, Bill Burega, Barry Cullen, Mickey Keating, Eddie Mazur and Ed Chadwick, the 1955 - 56 Warriors, managed by J. D. (Jack) Perrin, Jr., Vice President and General Manager and coached by Alf Pike, went on to win the Edinburgh Trophy, emblematic of the World's Minor Professional Hockey Championship. After six seasons, due to financial trouble relating to their long WHL traveling distances and uncompetitive rents levied by Winnipeg Enterprises, owners of Winnipeg Arena, Warriors owner Jack Perrin asked for a leave of absence from the WHL, which was granted. However, the Warriors never returned to the league.

The Olympic Rink was an ice hockey venue in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada that was located at the corner of Church Avenue and Charles Street in Winnipeg's North End. An apartment block, the "Olympic Towers", today stands on the site.

The 1958-59, Braves won the Abbott Cup as Western Canadian Junior ‘A’ Champions, and were the last team from Winnipeg to win the Memorial Cup as National Champions. Under the leadership of manager Bill Addison and coach Bill Allum, the Braves defeated the Peterborough Petes coached by 25-year-old Scotty Bowman. In the championship series, the Petes won the first game 5-4, and the Braves came back to win four straight games 5-2, 5-2, 5-3 and 6-2. The final game of the series was played in Brandon, Manitoba due to the Shrine Circus appearing at Winnipeg Arena. The team included future NHL'ers Ted Green and Ernie Wakely.

Abbott Cup Junior ice hockey tournament in western Canada

The Abbott Memorial Cup, commonly referred to as the Abbott Cup, was awarded annually from 1919 through 1999 to the Junior "A" ice hockey Champion for Western Canada.

Memorial Cup The Memorial Cup is a junior ice hockey club championship trophy

The Memorial Cup is a junior ice hockey club championship trophy awarded annually to the Canadian Hockey League (CHL) champion. It is awarded following a four-team, round-robin tournament between a host team and the champions of the CHL's three member leagues: the Ontario Hockey League (OHL), Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (QMJHL) and Western Hockey League (WHL). Sixty teams are eligible to compete for the Memorial Cup, representing nine provinces and four American states. The Acadie–Bathurst Titan are the current champions, winning in the final game against the host team, the Regina Pats of the WHL. The Memorial Cup is known as one of the toughest sporting trophies to win, due to 60 teams participating and the age limit only being 16-21.

Bill Allum Canadian ice hockey player

William James Douglas Allum was a Canadian ice hockey defenceman and coach. He played two games in the National Hockey League, one each for the New York Rangers and Chicago Black Hawks. He coached the 1959 Memorial Cup-winning Winnipeg Braves.

Roster: Pat Angers, Don Atamanchuk, Al Baty, Gary Bergman, Ernie Bradawaski, Rene Brunel, Ted Green, Howie Hughes, Allan Ingimundson, Ken King, Ted Knight, Jerry Kruk, Laurie Langrell, Wayne Larkin, Al LeBlanc, Bob Leiter, Doug Monro, Zenon Moroz, Lew Mueller, John Rodger, Paul Sexsmith, John Sutherland, Bob Wales, Wayne Winstone, Ernie Wakely, J. D. (Jack) Perrin Jr. (President), Bill Addison (Manager), Bill Allum (Coach), Jim Drury (Trainer).

Gary Gunnar Bergman was a Canadian professional ice hockey player. A defenceman, Bergman played in the NHL, mostly for the Detroit Red Wings. He was also a part of Team Canada in the 1972 Summit Series.

Ted Green Canadian ice hockey defenceman

Edward Joseph "Terrible Ted" Green is a Canadian former professional ice hockey coach and player. Green played defence for the NHL Boston Bruins and the WHA New England Whalers and Winnipeg Jets, and was noted for his physical play. Green has served as a head coach with the Edmonton Oilers, and as an assistant coach with the Oilers and the New York Rangers.

Howard Duncan Hughes is a Canadian retired professional ice hockey forward who played 168 games in the National Hockey League for the Los Angeles Kings.

The Memorial Cup Championship team was inducted into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame and Museum in 2003, and inducted into the Manitoba Hockey Hall of Fame in the team category.

The Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame and Museum is a museum in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, dedicated to the history of sports in Manitoba and honouring the best in sports. The organization began in 1980 and in 1993, a museum was opened in The Forks. After five years, the museum moved to The Bay store on Portage Avenue.

The Manitoba Hockey Hall of Fame and Museum was established in 1985 when the first honoured members were named and plaques were erected in their honour. The first group of inductees was large in order to recognize the accomplishments of Manitoba players, coaches, builders and teams at the international, national, provincial and local levels for many years. Induction ceremonies were held on an annual or bi-annual basis through 1993. Since 1995, the Foundation has added to its honour roll every second year.

Prior to the 1966-67 season, the team moved to St. James and changed its name to the St. James Braves.

St. James Canadians

During the summer of 1967, a community-minded sports group purchased the St. James Braves from Ben Hatskin. The team relocated to the brand new St. James Civic Centre, where they played as the St. James Canadians.

The Canadians won the Turnbull Cup three times (1968, 1996, 1997) throughout their 35 years in the MJHL. They played until the end of the 2002-03 season. The team took a one year leave of absence from the MJHL in 2003-04 before ceasing operations .

Season-by-season record

Note: GP = Games Played, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, OTL = Overtime Losses, GF = Goals for, GA = Goals against

Season GP W L T OTL GF GA Points Finish Playoffs
1957-58 30 13 16 1 - 146 135 27 3rd MJHL
1958-59 31 22 7 2 - 177 111 46 1st MJHL Won League, Won AbC, Won MC
1959-60 31 16 14 1 - 141 126 33 3rd MJHL
1960-61 32 18 14 0 - 145 117 36 3rd MJHL
1961-62 40 9 23 8 - 110 177 26 5th MJHL
1962-63 39 14 22 3 - 127 156 31 4th MJHL
1963-64 30 11 16 3 - 92 120 25 5th MJHL
1964-65 44 26 13 5 - 184 140 57 1st MJHL Won League
1965-66 48 20 24 4 - 207 219 44 3rd MJHL
1966-67 56 21 34 1 - 254 361 43 5th MJHL
1967-68 39 16 21 2 - 155 165 34 4th MJHL Won League
1968-69 34 16 14 4 - 142 146 36 5th MJHL
1969-70 34 16 12 6 - 146 136 38 4th MJHL
1970-71 48 21 22 5 - 170 184 47 5th MJHL
1971-72 48 31 16 1 - 256 191 63 3rd MJHL
1972-73 48 27 20 1 - 225 187 55 2nd MJHL
1973-74 48 19 27 2 - 216 223 38 6th MJHL
1974-75 48 29 19 0 - 281 238 58 3rd MJHL
1975-76 52 29 22 1 - 259 227 59 3rd MJHL
1976-77 51 21 30 0 - 239 249 44 7th MJHL
1977-78 52 25 27 0 - 265 258 50 7th MJHL
1978-79 48 30 18 0 - 273 219 60 1st MJHL
1979-80 47 28 18 1 - 236 191 57 4th MJHL
1980-81 47 38 8 1 - 353 210 77 2nd MJHL
1981-82 48 26 20 2 - 305 261 54 5th MJHL
1982-83 48 12 34 2 - 221 301 26 7th MJHL
1983-84 48 11 37 0 - 201 312 22 7th MJHL
1984-85 48 29 18 1 - 266 224 59 2nd MJHL
1985-86 48 29 18 1 - 276 221 59 4th MJHL
1986-87 47 23 22 2 - 226 230 48 7th MJHL
1987-88 48 21 25 2 - 223 215 44 6th MJHL
1988-89 48 10 35 3 - 186 305 23 8th MJHL
1989-90 52 24 28 0 - 253 275 48 7th MJHL
1990-91 48 25 20 3 - 267 249 53 4th MJHL
1991-92 48 30 16 1 1 242 207 62 3rd MJHL
1992-93 48 25 20 2 1 241 233 53 4th MJHL
1993-94 55 32 19 3 1 -- -- 68 2nd MJHL
1994-95 54 21 27 2 4 199 221 48 7th MJHL
1995-96 56 34 21 1 0 266 194 69 4th MJHL Won League
1996-97 55 31 22 0 2 226 183 64 4th MJHL Won League
1997-98 62 29 30 2 1 254 247 61 5th MJHL
1998-99 62 35 25 1 1 262 229 72 4th MJHL
1999-00 64 38 23 - 3 285 243 79 3rd MJHL
2000-01 64 26 31 - 7 224 240 59 10th MJHL
2001-02 64 33 25 - 6 228 200 72 6th MJHL
2002-03 63 6 56 - 1 166 405 13 11th MJHL
2003-04 Did Not Participate

Playoffs

St. James Canadians defeated Winnipeg Monarchs 4-games-to-2
St. Boniface Saints defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-none
St. James Canadians defeated Winnipeg Monarchs 4-games-to-2
West Kildonan North Stars defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-1
St. James Canadians defeated West Kildonan North Stars 9-points-to-7
St. Boniface Saints defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-none
St. Boniface Saints defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-2
St. James Canadians defeated St. Boniface Saints 4-games-to-none
West Kildonan North Stars defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-2
St. James Canadians defeated St. Boniface Saints 4-games-to-1
West Kildonan North Stars defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-3
Kildonan North Stars defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-1
Kenora Thistles defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-1
St. Boniface Saints defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-1
St. James Canadians defeated Fort Garry Blues 4-games-to-2
Kildonan North Stars defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-2
St. James Canadians defeated Fort Garry Blues 4-games-to-1
St. Boniface Saints defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-1
St. Boniface Saints defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-2
Fort Garry Blues defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-none
Fort Garry Blues defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-1
St. James Canadians defeated Thunder Bay Hornets 4-games-to-2
Winnipeg South Blues defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-1
St. James Canadians defeated St. Boniface Saints 4-games-to-3
Winnipeg South Blues defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-none
Winnipeg South Blues defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-none
St. James Canadians defeated St. Boniface Saints 4-games-to-1
Winnipeg South Blues defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-2
Winnipeg South Blues defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-1
St. James Canadians defeated Winnipeg South Blues 4-games-to-none
Kildonan North Stars defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-3
St. James Canadians defeated St. Boniface Saints 4-games-to-3
Winnipeg South Blues defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-1
St. James Canadians defeated Neepawa Natives 4-games-to-1
St. James Canadians defeated Winnipeg South Blues 4-games-to-none
Winkler Flyers defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-1
Fifth and eliminated in 1992 Centennial Cup round robin (1-3)
Winnipeg South Blues defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-2
St. James Canadians defeated Southeast Blades 4-games-to-1
St. Boniface Saints defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-1
Winnipeg South Blues defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-2
St. James Canadians defeated Selkirk Steelers 4-games-to-3
St. James Canadians defeated Winnipeg South Blues 4-games-to-none
St. James Canadians defeated Neepawa Natives 4-games-to-3MJHL CHAMPIONS
Melfort Mustangs (SJHL) defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-none
St. James Canadians defeated Winnipeg South Blues 4-games-to-1
St. James Canadians defeated Selkirk Steelers 4-games-to-none
St. James Canadians defeated OCN Blizzard 4-games-to-1MJHL CHAMPIONS
Weyburn Red Wings (SJHL) defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-1
St. James Canadians defeated Selkirk Steelers 4-games-to-2
St. James Canadians defeated Winnipeg South Blues
Winkler Flyers defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-1
St. Boniface Saints defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-2
Winkler Flyers defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-3
St. James Canadians defeated Winnipeg South Blues 4-games-to-3
Winkler Flyers defeated St. James Canadians 4-games-to-none

Notable alumni

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