Tennessee Theatre (Nashville)

Last updated
Tennessee Theatre
Address 535 Church Street
Nashville, Tennessee
United States
Coordinates 36°09′46″N86°46′52″W / 36.16265°N 86.78107°W / 36.16265; -86.78107 Coordinates: 36°09′46″N86°46′52″W / 36.16265°N 86.78107°W / 36.16265; -86.78107
Capacity 2,028
Construction
Opened 1952
Demolished 1980s
Architect Joseph W. Holman

The Tennessee Theatre was a 2,028 seat, single screen, Streamline Moderne movie palace at 535 Church Street, in Nashville, Tennessee completed in 1952. It was built with the designs of architect Joseph W. Holman in the shell of the 11-story, Art Deco Warner building that was completed in 1932, and the entire structure was demolished in the 1980s. The Cumberland Apartment highrise now sits on the site. The Theatre hosted the only Grammy Awards ceremony not held in either Los Angeles or New York City in 1973.

Streamline Moderne late type of the Art Deco architecture and design

Streamline Moderne is an international style of Art Deco architecture and design that emerged in the 1930s. It was inspired by aerodynamic design. Streamline architecture emphasized curving forms, long horizontal lines, and sometimes nautical elements. In industrial design, it was used in railroad locomotives, telephones, toasters, buses, appliances, and other devices to give the impression of sleekness and modernity.

Movie palace

A movie palace is any of the large, elaborately decorated movie theaters built between the 1910s and the 1940s. The late 1920s saw the peak of the movie palace, with hundreds opened every year between 1925 and 1930. With the advent of television, movie attendance dropped and many movie palaces were razed or converted into multiple screen venues or performing arts centers.

Tennessee State of the United States of America

Tennessee is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States. Tennessee is the 36th largest and the 16th most populous of the 50 United States. Tennessee is bordered by Kentucky to the north, Virginia to the northeast, North Carolina to the east, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi to the south, Arkansas to the west, and Missouri to the northwest. The Appalachian Mountains dominate the eastern part of the state, and the Mississippi River forms the state's western border. Nashville is the state's capital and largest city, with a 2017 population of 667,560. Tennessee's second largest city is Memphis, which had a population of 652,236 in 2017.

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