The First Stone (Rebus)

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"The First Stone"
Rebus episode
Episode no.Season 4
Episode 2
Directed byMorag Fullerton
Story by Ian Rankin
Teleplay by Colin Bateman
Original air dateOctober 2007 (STV)
Guest appearance(s)
Episode chronology
 Previous
"Resurrection Men"
Next 
" The Naming of the Dead"

The First Stone is a 2007 episode of STV's Rebus television series. It was the second episode broadcast in the show's fourth season, and starred Ken Stott in the title role. The episode was based on an Ian Rankin short story. [1]

Scottish Television television studio and ITV franchisee in Scotland, United Kingdom

Scottish Television is the ITV franchise for Central Scotland. The channel - the largest of the three ITV franchises in Scotland - has been in operation since 31 August 1957 and is the second oldest franchise holder still active.

<i>Rebus</i> (TV series) television series

Rebus is a British television detective drama series based on the Inspector Rebus novels by the Scottish author Ian Rankin. The series was produced by STV Productions for the ITV network, and four series were broadcast between 26 April 2000 and 7 December 2007. The first series starred John Hannah as DI John Rebus; and was co-produced by Hannah's own production company, Clerkenwell Films. After Hannah quit the series, the role of Rebus was re-cast, with Ken Stott appearing as Rebus in three subsequent series, which were produced in-house by STV.

Ken Stott Scottish actor

Kenneth Campbell Stott is a Scottish stage, television and film actor who won the Laurence Olivier Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role in 1995 in the play Broken Glass at Royal National Theatre. He is more recently known for his role as the dwarf Balin in The Hobbit film trilogy (2012–2014), and as Ian Garrett in the 2014 BBC TV mini-series The Missing starring alongside James Nesbitt.

Contents

Plot

Rebus is called to investigate the murder of a Church of Scotland minister, whose body is discovered during the General Assembly at which he was to be elected Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church. of Scotland. At first the solution seems straightforward, but Rebus finds there are secrets in the man's past which provide the real explanation.

Church of Scotland national church of Scotland

The Church of Scotland, also known by its Scots language name, the Kirk, is the national church of Scotland. It is Presbyterian and adheres to the Bible and Westminster Confession; the Church of Scotland celebrates two sacraments, Baptism and the Lord's Supper, as well as five other rites, such as confirmation and matrimony. It is a member of the World Communion of Reformed Churches.

Moderator of the General Assembly Religious leader

The moderator of the General Assembly is the chairperson of a General Assembly, the highest court of a presbyterian or reformed church. Kirk sessions and presbyteries may also style the chairperson as moderator.

The script was written by Colin Bateman, and based on a sub-plot in the short story "Atonement" written in 2005 for a collection of short stories by Rankin.

Cast

Claire Louise Price is an English actress.

Andrew Ewan Stewart is a Scottish film, television and stage actor.

Lorcan Cranitch Irish actor

Lorcan Cranitch is an Irish actor.

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References

  1. "An Inspector Calls On Paisley! - Daily Express". Paisleydailyexpress.co.uk. 2007-04-03. Retrieved 2012-05-04.