The Ghost Talks (1949 film)

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The Ghost Talks
Ghosttalks49LOBBY.jpg
Directed by Jules White
Produced byJules White
Written by Felix Adler
Starring Moe Howard
Larry Fine
Shemp Howard
Phil Arnold
Don Brodie
Nancy Saunders
Cinematography M.A. Anderson
Edited by Edwin H. Bryant
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release date
  • February 3, 1949 (1949-02-03)(U.S.)
Running time
16:20
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

The Ghost Talks is a 1949 short subject directed by Jules White starring American slapstick comedy team The Three Stooges (Moe Howard, Larry Fine and Shemp Howard). It is the 113th entry in the series released by Columbia Pictures starring the comedians, who released 190 shorts for the studio between 1934 and 1959.

Contents

Plot

The Stooges are moving men assigned to move furniture out of the haunted Smorgasbord Castle. All goes well at first, outside of a few scares, until a clanking suit of armor inhabited by the ghost of Peeping Tom (voiced by Phil Arnold) scares the hapless Stooges, until he convinces them that he is, in fact, a friendly spirit. After finally gaining their trust, Tom tells the trio the story of his watching Lady Godiva (Nancy Saunders), only to get a pie in the face. In turn, his ghost is cursed and trapped inside the suit of armor, having been trapped for a thousand years.

The Stooges, however, still have a job to do and tell Tom that they have to move everything in the castle, including him. He instructs the boys to leave him be, as "bad luck" will be upon them if they ever try to take him away. Shemp, Larry and Moe all take turns trying to move Tom, but a series of various shenanigans, such as a frog jumping down Shemp's shirt and an owl entering a skull and assuming the role of a death's head spirit, spooks the Stooges. As they run into another room to escape, Lady Godiva rides up on a horse and takes Tom away. The Stooges rush over to the window to watch them depart, only to be pelted with three successive pies amidst a cheering crowd.

Cast

Credited

Uncredited

Production notes

The Ghost Talks was filmed on August 26–29, 1947, and released 18 months later on February 3, 1949. [1] It was remade in 1956 as Creeps , using ample stock footage. [2]

Director Jules White voiced the skeleton identifying himself as "Red Skeleton", a reference to comedian Red Skelton. [2]

The NBC chimes are heard when Moe hits Shemp three times on his head. [2]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "The Ghost Talks (1949)". https://threestooges.net/ . Retrieved 1 May 2020.External link in |website= (help)
  2. 1 2 3 Solomon, Jon. (2002) The Complete Three Stooges: The Official Filmography and Three Stooges Companion; Comedy III Productions, Inc., ISBN   0-9711868-0-4