The Rosary (1931 film)

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No Lady
Directed by Guy Newall
Written byJohn McNally
Guy Newall
Produced by Julius Hagen
Starring Margot Grahame
Elizabeth Allan
Leslie Perrins
Cinematography Basil Emmott
Production
company
Distributed byWilliams and Pritchard Films
Release date
3 July 1931
Running time
70 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

The Rosary is a 1931 British drama film directed by Guy Newall and starring Margot Grahame, Elizabeth Allan and Leslie Perrins. It was shot at Twickenham Studios in London. [1] The film's sets were designed by the art director James A. Carter. It was released as an independent first feature, despite being produced by a company that generally concentrated on quota quickies.

Contents

Synopsis

A woman takes the blame for a murder accidentally committed by her half-sister. [2]

Cast

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References

  1. Wood p.73
  2. BFI.org

Bibliography