Thomas Pryce-Jenkins

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Thomas Pryce-Jenkins
Birth name Thomas John Pryce-Jenkins
Date of birth(1862-02-01)1 February 1862
Place of birth Carmarthen, Wales
Date of death 6 August 1922(1922-08-06) (aged 60)
Place of death London, England
School Llandovery College
University Cambridge University
Occupation(s) doctor
Rugby union career
Position(s) Centre
Amateur team(s)
YearsTeamApps(Points)
National team(s)
YearsTeamApps(Points)
1888 Wales [1] 2 (0)

Dr. Thomas John Pryce-Jenkins (1 February 1862 - 6 August 1922) was a Welsh international rugby union wing who played club rugby for London Welsh and county rugby for Middlesex. Pryce-Jenkins represented Wales twice but he is more notable within the field of rugby for being a founding member of London Welsh.

Wales Country in northwest Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and the island of Great Britain. It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon, its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone and has a changeable, maritime climate.

Rugby union Team sport, code of rugby football

Rugby union, commonly known in most of the world simply as rugby, is a contact team sport which originated in England in the first half of the 19th century. One of the two codes of rugby football, it is based on running with the ball in hand. In its most common form, a game is between two teams of 15 players using an oval-shaped ball on a rectangular field with H-shaped goalposts on each try line.

London Welsh RFC rugby union team

London Welsh Rugby Football Club is a professional rugby union club formed in 1885. Based in Old Deer Park, Richmond-upon-Thames, London Welsh RFC played in the English Premiership in the 2012–13 and 2014–15 seasons, after gaining promotion from the RFU Championship in the 2012 and 2014 play-off final. The club returned to Old Deer Park in 2015 after three seasons at the Kassam Stadium, Oxford.

Contents

Personal history

Pryce-Jenkins was born in 1864 to the rector of Llanllwch, a village outside Carmarthen in South Wales. [2] He was educated at Llandovery College and later Cambridge University. After leaving university, Pryce-Jones took time away from education and joined a touring theatrical company. After four years he returned to London and completed his medical studies, setting up a surgery at Hills Place behind the Palladium. A strong athlete he turned his amateur interest in games into his medical speciality, treating athletic injuries. Notable patients included runners Alfred Shrubb and Reggie Walker. [3] He would later treat players from London Welsh never charging them for his services. [3]

Llanllwch village in United Kingdom

Llanllwch is a hamlet in Wales approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) west of Carmarthen.

Carmarthen county town of Carmarthenshire, Wales

Carmarthen is the county town of Carmarthenshire in Wales and a community. It lies on the River Towy 8 miles (13 km) north of its estuary in Carmarthen Bay. Carmarthen has a strong claim to be the oldest town in Wales – the settlements of Old Carmarthen and New Carmarthen became one borough in 1546. Carmarthen was the most populous borough in Wales in the 16th–18th centuries, described by William Camden as "the chief citie of the country". Growth stagnated by the mid-19th century, as new economic centres developed in the South Wales coalfield. The population in 2011 was 14,185, down from 15,854 in 2001. Dyfed–Powys Police headquarters, Glangwili General Hospital and a campus of the University of Wales Trinity Saint David are located in Carmarthen.

Llandovery College is a coeducational independent school in Llandovery, Carmarthenshire, Wales. The college consists of Gollop Preparatory, Senior School and Sixth Form. It was previously known as "Welsh College, Llandovery" and "Collegiate Institute" at various periods of its history.

Pryce-Jenkins took a leading role in the formation of the London Welsh Battalion at the outbreak of World War I, and became a medical advisor at the London Depot. Pryce-Jenkins was also an amateur writing, completing several short stories and a play, 'Sands of Time'. [3]

Pryce-Jenkins died in 1922 at the age of 58, he was buried at Marylebone Cemetery. [2]

Marylebone inner-city area of central London

Marylebone is an area in the West End of London, England, which is part of the City of Westminster.

Rugby career

In 1885 a group of rugby enthusiasts met to form a rugby club within London, specifically for Welsh players. An informal meeting took place that year, followed by an official formation at the Arlington Hotel in Fleet Street on 24 June. Pryce-Jenkins was one of those present and became a member of the first committee. [4]

Fleet Street street in the City of London, England

Fleet Street is a major street mostly in the City of London. It runs west to east from Temple Bar at the boundary with the City of Westminster to Ludgate Circus at the site of the London Wall and the River Fleet from which the street was named.

Although representing other clubs before this time, Pryce-Jenkins played the majority of his club rugby for London Welsh, and was still playing for the club when he was selected to represent Wales in 1888. His first cap was against Scotland under the captaincy of Tom Clapp, and Pryce-Jenkins scored the only points of the game when he ran half the length of the pitch to score in the first half. Wales are then reported to have killed the game by lying on the ball or kicking it continually out of touch. His second and final international match was an away trip against Ireland, which Wales lost.

Tom Clapp was an English-born international rugby union forward who played club rugby for Newport and Nantyglo RFC. He won 14 caps for Wales and captained the team on three occasions. Clapp was the first Newport player to captain Wales.

International matches played

Wales [5]

Bibliography

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References

  1. Welsh Rugby Union player profiles
  2. 1 2 Jones (1985), pg 5.
  3. 1 2 3 Jones (1985), pg 4.
  4. Jones (1985), pg 3.
  5. Smith (1980), pg 470.