Thomas Pryce-Jenkins

Last updated

Thomas Pryce-Jenkins
Dr T J Pryce-Jenkins.jpg
Dr T J Pryce-Jenkins circa 1909
Birth nameThomas John Pryce-Jenkins
Date of birth(1864-02-01)1 February 1864
Place of birth Carmarthen, Wales
Date of death6 August 1922(1922-08-06) (aged 58)
Place of death London, England
SchoolLlandovery College
UniversityCambridge University
Occupation(s)doctor
Rugby union career
Position(s) Centre
Amateur team(s)
YearsTeamApps(Points)
London Welsh RFC
Blackheath F.C.
St. Bart's Hospital
Middlesex
()
National team(s)
YearsTeamApps(Points)
1888 Wales [1] 2 (0)

Dr. Thomas John Pryce-Jenkins (1 February 1864 – 6 August 1922) was a Welsh international rugby union wing who played club rugby for London Welsh and county rugby for Middlesex. Pryce-Jenkins represented Wales twice but he is more notable within the field of rugby for being a founding member of London Welsh.

Contents

Personal history

Pryce-Jenkins was born in 1864 to the rector of Llanllwch, a village outside Carmarthen in South Wales. [2] He was educated at Llandovery College and later Cambridge University. After leaving university, Pryce-Jones took time away from education and joined a touring theatrical company. After four years he returned to London and completed his medical studies, setting up a surgery at Hills Place behind the Palladium. A strong athlete he turned his amateur interest in games into his medical speciality, treating athletic injuries. Notable patients included runners Alfred Shrubb and Reggie Walker. [3] He would later treat players from London Welsh never charging them for his services. [3]

Pryce-Jenkins took a leading role in the formation of the London Welsh Battalion at the outbreak of World War I, and became a medical advisor at the London Depot. Pryce-Jenkins was also an amateur writing, completing several short stories and a play, 'Sands of Time'. [3]

Pryce-Jenkins died in 1922 at the age of 58, and was buried at Marylebone Cemetery. [2]

Rugby career

In 1885 a group of rugby enthusiasts met to form a rugby club within London, specifically for Welsh players. An informal meeting took place that year, followed by an official formation at the Arlington Hotel in Fleet Street on 24 June. Pryce-Jenkins was one of those present and became a member of the first committee. [4]

Although representing other clubs before this time, Pryce-Jenkins played the majority of his club rugby for London Welsh, and was still playing for the club when he was selected to represent Wales in 1888. His first cap was against Scotland under the captaincy of Tom Clapp, and Pryce-Jenkins scored the only points of the game when he ran half the length of the pitch to score in the first half. Wales are then reported to have killed the game by lying on the ball or kicking it continually out of touch. His second and final international match was an away trip against Ireland, which Wales lost.

International matches played

Wales [5]

Bibliography

Related Research Articles

Arthur Gould (rugby union) Welsh rugby union player

Arthur Joseph "Monkey" Gould was a Welsh international rugby union centre and fullback who was most associated as a club player with Newport Rugby Football Club. He won 27 caps for Wales, 18 as captain, and critics consider him the first superstar of Welsh rugby. A talented all-round player and champion sprinter, Gould could side-step and kick expertly with either foot. He never ceased practising to develop his fitness and skills, and on his death was described as "the most accomplished player of his generation".

Frank Hill (rugby union) Rugby player

Frank Hill was a Welsh international rugby union forward who played club rugby for Cardiff. Hill won 15 caps for Wales over a period of ten years and was given the team captaincy on four occasions.

Charles Thomas was a Welsh international rugby union utility player who played club rugby for Newport and invitational rugby for the Barbarians. Thomas won nine caps for Wales.

Richard 'Dick' Powell was a Welsh international rugby union forward who played club rugby for Abergavenny and Newport.

Martyn Jordan Rugby player

Martyn Jordan was an English-born international rugby union player who played club rugby for London Welsh and Newport and international rugby for Wales. Jordan played in three games for Wales scoring two tries, though at the time scoring tries carried no points.

Rowland 'Rowley' Lewis Thomas was a Welsh international rugby union forward who played club rugby for London Welsh, of whom he was a founding member, and county rugby for Middlesex. Thomas played international rugby for Wales and was capped seven times.

Edward Bishop (rugby union) Rugby player

Edward "Teddy" Bishop was a Welsh international rugby union player who played club rugby for Swansea and was capped once for Wales.

Willie Thomas Wales international rugby union footballer

William Henry Thomas was a Welsh international rugby union player who played club rugby for Llanelli and London Welsh. He was capped eleven times for Wales and captained the team on two occasions. In 1888, Thomas was chosen to tour New Zealand and Australia as part of the first British Isles team. This unofficial tour did not play any international opposition and no caps were awarded.

Alexander "Alec" Frederick Bland was a Welsh international rugby union forward who played club rugby for Cardiff. Bland won nine caps for Wales over a period of four years.

John Meredith was a Welsh international rugby union forward who played club rugby for Swansea and won four caps for Wales. Outside rugby, Meredith later became a literary adjudicator in Eisteddfodau.

Quentin Dick Kedzlie was a Scottish-born international rugby union forward who played club rugby for Cardiff and international rugby for Wales. In his later life he became the chairman of the South Wales Baseball Association.

Owen James 'Jem' Evans was a Welsh rugby union half-back who played club rugby for Cardiff and international rugby for Wales. Evans was one of the earliest half-backs to play for Wales and was awarded four caps between 1887 and 1888, though never with the same partner.

Edward John "Ned" Roberts was a Welsh international rugby union fullback who played club rugby for Llanelli and international rugby for Wales.

Alfred Mathews Wales international rugby union footballer & priest

Alfred Augustus Mathews was a Welsh priest who was notable as a rugby union player in his youth; representing Lampeter at club level and playing a single international match for Wales.

Tom Williams (rugby union, born 1859) Wales international rugby union footballer

Thomas Williams was a Welsh rugby union forward who played club rugby for Cardiff and Pontypridd and international rugby for Wales. A solicitor by profession, Williams would later become a national selector for the Welsh Rugby Union. Williams was also responsible for suggesting the singing of the Welsh national anthem in a match in 1905, the first time a national anthem was sung before a sporting event.

T. Williams was a rugby union forward who played club rugby for Swansea and London Welsh and played international rugby for Wales. Very little is known of Williams and he is often confused with his contemporary Tom Williams who also played for Wales around the same period, and who also had connections with London Welsh.

William Llewellyn Morgan was a Welsh international rugby union halfback who played club rugby for Cardiff. Morgan played international rugby for Wales and in 1908 was selected to join Arthur Harding's Anglo-Welsh tour of New Zealand and Australia.

John "Bala" Jones was a Wales international rugby union scrum-half who played club rugby for Aberavon and Devonport Albion RFC and county rugby for Glamorgan and Devon. He won just a single international cap, in 1901.

Hopkin Maddock Wales international rugby union footballer

Lieutenant Hopkin "Hop" Thomas Maddock MC was a Welsh international rugby union wing who played club rugby for Pontycymer and London Welsh and county rugby for both Glamorgan and Middlesex. Maddock played in six international rugby games for Wales scoring a total of six tries. A pacey and elusive runner, Maddock set several scoring records at London Welsh, and scored 170 tries during his career with the club.

John "Jack" Charles Jenkins was a Welsh international rugby union forward who played club rugby for Newport and London Welsh. He won just a single cap for Wales in 1907 but faced both New Zealand and South Africa at county level with Middlesex and Monmouthshire.

References

  1. Welsh Rugby Union player profiles
  2. 1 2 Jones (1985), pg 5.
  3. 1 2 3 Jones (1985), pg 4.
  4. Jones (1985), pg 3.
  5. Smith (1980), pg 470.