Thomas Ryan (American football)

Last updated
Thomas Ryan
Vanderbilt CommodoresNo. 6; 23
Position End, Fullback, punter
ClassGraduate
Personal information
Born: Crowley, Louisiana
Height6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight190 lb (86 kg)
Career history
College Vanderbilt (1920–1921; 1923–1924)
High school Central (Houston)
Career highlights and awards
  • All-Southern (1921, 1924)
  • All-Southern (basketball, 1922)
  • SIAA championship (1921)
  • Porter Cup (1922)
  • SoCon championship (1923)

Thomas Francis Ryan was a college football and basketball player.

Contents

Vanderbilt University

Ryan was a prominent end and fullback and punter for Dan McGugin's Vanderbilt Commodores football team of the Vanderbilt University from 1920 to 1921 and 1923 to 1924. He was also a guard on the basketball team, selected All-Southern by some writers in 1922. [1]

1921

Ryan c. 1921. Tomryan.jpg
Ryan c. 1921.

In a 34–0 victory over Middle Tennessee State Normal, The Commodore, Vanderbilt's yearbook, reported the lone plus of the passing game, stating "Practically the only thing of note was the aerial efficiency—Kuhn to Ryan and Kuhn to McCullough." The Commodores upset the Texas Longhorns 20–0. On a third down, at some point near the middle of the second quarter, Texas' Ivan Robertson, with the Commodores' Tom Ryan and Tex Bradford running after him, threw a pass not near a single Longhorn; which was intercepted by Vanderbilt's captain Pink Wade. Wade returned the interception for 65 yards and the first touchdown of the game. [2] In the effective Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (SIAA) championship game, Vanderbilt tied the favored Georgia Bulldogs in the final quarter using a trick onside punt kicked by Ryan. [3] Ryan lined up to punt. Rupert Smith sneaked in behind Ryan, and rushed to recover the 25-yard onside kick. Smith jumped up to get the ball off the bounce among a hoard of Bulldogs, after they had let it bounce, [4] including the outstretched arms of the Bulldogs' Hartley, and raced for a 15-yard touchdown. [5] Vanderbilt therefore tied for a conference title. Ryan was on Walter Camp's list of all players worthy of mention. [6]

1922

Ryan did not return for the 1922 season, preferring to stay an adjunct of the oil industry in Tampico, Mexico. [7]

1923

The school's last football conference title to date came in 1923. In the 3–0 loss to national champion Michigan, Ryan had a fine game, out-punting the famed Harry Kipke. [8]

1924

Vanderbilt beat Georgia Tech in Atlanta for the first time since 1906 on a Hek Wakefield drop kick. The punting battle between Doug Wycoff and Ryan was one of the few noted features of the game. [9] The first touchdown drive of the 16–0 win over Minnesota ended when Ryan broke through a hole created by Bob Rives, finishing a 63-yard march. [10] Ryan was selected All-Southern by his teammates. [11]

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References

  1. "The Mercer Cluster. (Macon, Ga.) 1920-current, March 10, 1922, Image 1 « Georgia Historic Newspapers".
  2. "Commodores Defeat Texas Longhorns before Crowded Stadium, 20 to 0". Dallas Morning News. October 23, 1921.
  3. "Game Between Two Universities Tied". Durham Morning Herald. November 13, 1921. p. 2. Retrieved May 9, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  4. "Game With Vandy Is Tied As Novel Play Is Pulled Successful". The Red And Black. November 18, 1921.
  5. "Georgia and Vandy Battle to a Draw". The Columbus Enquirer. November 13, 1921.
  6. Camp, Walter, ed. National Collegiate Athletic Association Football Rules: Official Intercollegiate Football Guide. 45 Rose St, New York: American Sports, 1922. Print. Spalding's Athletic Library.
  7. Closed Access logo transparent.svg "Vandy Loses Thomas Ryan". Atlanta Constitution. October 11, 1922.
  8. Russell, Fred, and Maxwell Edward Benson. Fifty Years of Vanderbilt Football. Nashville, TN, 1938, p. 42
  9. "Strategy of Commodores Defeats Tech". Atlanta Constitution. November 16, 1924.
  10. "Gophers Beaten By Vanderbilt Commodores, 16-0". Spartanburg Herald. November 22, 1924.
  11. Lawrence Perry (December 4, 1924). "Game's For The Sake". Harrisburg Telegraph. p. 20. Retrieved March 7, 2015 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg