Thomas Scawen (died 1774)

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Thomas Scawen (died 1774) was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1727 to 1741.

The House of Commons is the elected lower house of the bicameral parliaments of the United Kingdom and Canada and historically was the name of the lower houses of the Kingdom of England, Kingdom of Great Britain, Kingdom of Ireland, Northern Ireland, and Southern Ireland. Roughly equivalent bodies in other countries which were once part of the British Empire include the United States House of Representatives, the Australian House of Representatives, the New Zealand House of Representatives, and India's Lok Sabha.

Scawen was the son of Sir Thomas Scawen and his wife Martha Wessell, the daughter of Abraham Wessell, a London merchant. In 1722 he inherited the property of his uncle Sir William Scawen which included Carshalton Park. He married Tryphena Russell, daughter of Lord James Russell of Maidwell, Northamptonshire on 8 June 1725. [1]

Sir Thomas Scawen was a British merchant, financier and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1708 and 1722. He was Governor of the Bank of England from 1721 to 1723.

Sir William Scawen was a British MP and Governor of the Bank of England.

Carshalton Park public park in Carshalton, in the London Borough of Sutton

Carshalton Park is a public park in Carshalton, in the London Borough of Sutton. It is situated south of the High Street, in the area bounded by Ruskin Road, Ashcombe Road, Woodstock Road and The Park. Carshalton Park and some of the surrounding houses, are within a conservation area.

Scawen was returned as Member of Parliament for Surrey in a by-election on 12 April 1727. He was an opposition Whig. At the 1727 general election he joined interests with John Walter, the other outgoing Member, against Arthur Onslow. Walter tried to step down when it was apparent that the poll was going in Onslow’s favour, but the sheriff ruled that the poll must proceed. Scawen obtained a small majority over Walter by the second votes of Onslow’s supporters. In the 1734 general election he was re-elected unopposed with Onslow. He voted regularly with the Opposition. He did not stand again in 1741 but in 1747 he used his interest at Mitchell to bring in Thomas Clarke for that borough at the request of Lord Chancellor Hardwicke. He also brought in his son James Scawen at Mitchell in 1761. [1]

Surrey was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. It was represented by two Members of Parliament until 1832.

1727 British general election

The 1727 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 7th Parliament of Great Britain to be summoned, after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. The election was triggered by the death of King George I; at the time, it was the convention to hold new elections following the succession of a new monarch. The Tories, led in the House of Commons by William Wyndham, and under the direction of Bolingbroke, who had returned to the country in 1723 after being pardoned for his role in the Jacobite rising of 1715, lost further ground to the Whigs, rendering them ineffectual and largely irrelevant to practical politics. A group known as the Patriot Whigs, led by William Pulteney, who were disenchanted with Walpole's government and believed he was betraying Whig principles, had been formed prior to the election. Bolingbroke and Pulteney had not expected the next election to occur until 1729, and were consequently caught unprepared and failed to make any gains against the government party.

1734 British general election

The 1734 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 8th Parliament of Great Britain to be summoned, after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. Robert Walpole's increasingly unpopular Whig government lost ground to the Tories and the opposition Whigs, but still had a secure majority in the House of Commons. The Patriot Whigs were joined in opposition by a group of Whig members led by Lord Cobham known as the Cobhamites, or 'Cobham's Cubs'

Scawen died on 11 February 1774. [1] His daughter Tryphena married Henry Bathurst, 2nd Earl Bathurst.

Henry Bathurst, 2nd Earl Bathurst British lawyer and politician; Lord Chancellor of Great Britain

Henry Bathurst, 2nd Earl Bathurst, known as The Lord Apsley from 1771 to 1775, was a British lawyer and politician. He was Lord Chancellor of Great Britain from 1771 to 1778.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "SCAWEN, Thomas (d.1774), of Carshalton, Surr". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 30 September 2017.

Sources

Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
John Walter
Sir Nicholas Carew
Member of Parliament for Surrey
1727–1741
With: John Walter 1727
Arthur Onslow 1727-1741
Succeeded by
Arthur Onslow
The Lord Baltimore