Thomas Scott House (Greensboro, North Carolina)

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Thomas Scott House
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Location SR 1001, near Greensboro, North Carolina
Coordinates 36°10′06″N79°47′28″W / 36.16833°N 79.79111°W / 36.16833; -79.79111 Coordinates: 36°10′06″N79°47′28″W / 36.16833°N 79.79111°W / 36.16833; -79.79111
Area 19.6 acres (7.9 ha)
Built c. 1821 (1821)
NRHP reference # 84002328 [1]
Added to NRHP July 12, 1984

Thomas Scott House is a historic home located near Greensboro, Guilford County, North Carolina. It was built about 1821, and consists of the brick, two-story, single-pile main block and a frame rear ell. It features a three-part corbeled brick cornice at the roofline. Also on the property are two contributing frame outbuildings. [2]

Greensboro, North Carolina City in North Carolina, United States

Greensboro is a city in the U.S. state of North Carolina. It is the 3rd-most populous city in North Carolina, the 68th-most populous city in the United States, and the county seat and largest city in Guilford County and the surrounding Piedmont Triad metropolitan region. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 269,666, and in 2015 the estimated population was 285,342. Three major interstate highways in the Piedmont region of central North Carolina were built to intersect at this city.

Guilford County, North Carolina County in the United States

Guilford County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 488,406, making it the third-most populous county in North Carolina. Its seat is Greensboro. Since 1938, an additional county court has been located in High Point, North Carolina. The county was formed in 1771.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. Peter R. Kaplan and Marshall Bullock (n.d.). "Thomas Scott House" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2014-11-01.