Thomas Simpson (actor)

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Thomas Simpson was an English stage actor of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth century. [1] His surname is sometimes written as Sympson.

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He joined the United Company from the 1687-88 season, but his early roles are unknown. Following the 1695 split he stayed at Drury Lane with Christopher Rich's company and acted in a number of roles until 1702. From 1703 he William Bullock and William Pinkethman operated a theatrical stall at Bartholomew Fair. [2]

Selected roles

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References

  1. Highfill, Burnim & Langhans p.96
  2. Highfill, Burnim & Langhans p.96

Bibliography