Thomas Talbot (bottler)

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Image of the Talbot & Co. works on Commercial Road, Gloucester. Talbot & Co. advert.jpg
Image of the Talbot & Co. works on Commercial Road, Gloucester.
Thomas Talbot advert, Gloucester Journal , 1874. Thomas Talbot advert Gloucester 1874.jpg
Thomas Talbot advert, Gloucester Journal , 1874.
Former premises of Talbots Bottlers, Ladybellegate Street, Gloucester, 2015. Talbots Bottlers, Gloucester 01.JPG
Former premises of Talbots Bottlers, Ladybellegate Street, Gloucester, 2015.
Former Talbots Bottlers premises, incorporating remains of Blackfriars on the right. Talbots Bottlers, Gloucester 05.JPG
Former Talbots Bottlers premises, incorporating remains of Blackfriars on the right.
Blackfriars buildings formerly used by Talbots. Talbots Bottlers, Gloucester 02.JPG
Blackfriars buildings formerly used by Talbots.
Blackfriars buildings formerly used by Talbots. Talbots Bottlers, Gloucester 08.JPG
Blackfriars buildings formerly used by Talbots.

Thomas Talbot (1819 - 14 February 1891) was a beverage bottler of Gloucester who founded the Talbot Mineral Water Company in 1845. In 1886, he was elected high sheriff of Gloucester and later became an alderman of the city.

Gloucester City and Non-metropolitan district in England

Gloucester is a city and district in Gloucestershire, in the South West of England, of which it is the county town. Gloucester lies close to the Welsh border, on the River Severn, between the Cotswolds to the east and the Forest of Dean to the southwest.

A high sheriff is a ceremonial officer for each shrieval county of England and Wales and Northern Ireland or the chief sheriff of a number of paid sheriffs in U.S. states who outranks and commands the others in their court-related functions. In Canada, the High Sheriff provides administrative services to the supreme and provincial courts.

Contents

Early life and family

Thomas Talbot was born in Portsea, Hampshire, in 1819 to Thomas and Maria Talbot. [1] He had a sister Eliza who became a governess. [2] He married Ann Ratcliffe Buston or Burton in Gloucester in 1845. [3] [4] In the 1851 census he was shown as a "Soda water manufacturer and grocer" at 45 Lower Northgate Street. [2] He had daughters Amelia and Ann, and sons Thomas and Edward. [5] In the 1881 census he was shown as a "Mineral Water Manufacturer Master Employ 9 Men 4 Boys" residing at 4 Commercial Road. [6]

Talbots Bottlers

Talbot founded the Talbot Mineral Water Company in 1845. The firm had premises in Ladybellegate Street from at least 1867 and occupied some of the buildings of the former Blackfriars monastery and built some new buildings along Commercial Road. In 1873 the firm also had premises at 48 Northgate Street. It later became Talbot Bottlers (Gloucester) Limited. [7]

Ladybellegate Street

Ladybellegate Street is a street in Gloucester that runs from Longsmith Street in the north to Commercial Road in the south. It is joined only by Blackfriars on its eastern side. The former Blackfriars monastery is located on the eastern side of the street together with three grade II* listed town houses and the former premises of Talbots Bottlers.

Blackfriars, Gloucester Grade I listed building in the United Kingdom

Blackfriars, Gloucester, England, founded about 1239, is one of the most complete surviving Dominican black friaries in England. Now owned by English Heritage and restored in 1960, it is currently leased to Gloucester City Council and used for weddings, concerts, exhibitions, guided tours, filming, educational events and private hires. The former church, since converted into a house, is a Grade I listed building.

Apart from mineral water, the firm produced seltzer water, potass water, lemonade, soda water, ginger ale, magnesia water, aerated lime juice, lithia water, quinine tonic water and orange champagne. [7] Later they began to bottle alcoholic drinks, included beer and cider for Bass and Worthington.

Mineral water water from a mineral spring

Mineral water is water from a mineral spring that contains various minerals, such as salts and sulfur compounds. Mineral water may be classified as "still" or "sparkling" (carbonated/effervescent) according to the presence or absence of added gases.

Lithia water

Lithia water is defined as a type of mineral water characterized by the presence of lithium salts. Natural lithia mineral spring waters are rare and there are few commercially bottled lithia water products.

In 1959 they had offices in Westgate Street. [7] The firm went out of business around that time.[ citation needed ] Archaeological investigations of the Ladybellegate site were carried out after 2000 in connection with proposals to redevelop adjacent buildings. [8] [9] The site is now in the ownership of Historic England.

Westgate, Gloucester

The Westgate area of Gloucester is centred on Westgate Street, one of the four main streets of Gloucester and one of the oldest parts of the city. The population of the Westgate ward in Gloucester was 6,687 at the time of the 2011 Census.

Historic England Executive non-departmental public body of the British Government, tasked with protecting the historical environment of England

Historic England is an executive non-departmental public body of the British Government sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). It is tasked with protecting the historical environment of England by preserving and listing historic buildings, ancient monuments and advising central and local government.

City of Gloucester

In 1881, Talbot was president of The Gloucester Fish and Game Supply Society Limited. [10] In 1884, he successfully stood for election in the east ward of the City of Gloucester. He was of a Conservative disposition. [11] In November 1886, he was elected high sheriff of the city and served for one year. In November 1888, he was elected for one year an alderman of Gloucester. He was a sidesman of St Mary de Crypt Church. [12]

Death

Talbot died on 14 February 1891. He had been in ill health for some time. The immediate cause of his death was chronic asthma and bronchitis. [12]

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References

  1. Hampshire baptisms Transcription. findmypast Retrieved 28 December 2015. (subscription required)
  2. 1 2 1851 England, Wales & Scotland Census Transcription. findmypast Retrieved 28 December 2015. (subscription required)
  3. England & Wales marriages 1837-2008 Transcription. findmypast Retrieved 28 December 2015. (subscription required)
  4. England Marriages 1538-1973 Transcription. findmypast Retrieved 28 December 2015. (subscription required)
  5. 1861 England, Wales & Scotland Census Transcription. findmypast Retrieved 28 December 2015. (subscription required)
  6. 1881 England, Wales & Scotland Census Transcription. findmypast Retrieved 28 December 2015. (subscription required)
  7. 1 2 3 West, Chris. (2014) Fading ads of Gloucester. Stroud: History Press. p. 34. ISBN   978-0752492650
  8. Gloucester bottling firm unearthed. Gloucester Citizen , 8 March 2010. Retrieved 26 December 2015.
  9. Saunders, Kelly. (2004) Clutch Clinic Blackfriars Gloucester. Cirencester: Cotswold Archaeology.
  10. Classified columns, Gloucester Journal, 19 March 1881, p. 4. British Newspaper Archive. (subscription required)
  11. "Election Addresses", The Citizen, 27 October 1884. British Newspaper Archive. (subscription required)
  12. 1 2 Death of Mr. Thomas Talbot. The Citizen , 16 February 1891, p. 4. British Newspaper Archive. (subscription required)