Thomas Wadley Raoul House

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Thomas Wadley Raoul House
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Location394 Vanderbilt Rd., Asheville, North Carolina
Coordinates 35°32′3″N82°32′24″W / 35.53417°N 82.54000°W / 35.53417; -82.54000 Coordinates: 35°32′3″N82°32′24″W / 35.53417°N 82.54000°W / 35.53417; -82.54000
Area3.5 acres (1.4 ha)
Built1923 (1923)
Built byMerchant Construction Co.
ArchitectParker, Charles N.
Architectural styleTudor Revival, Bungalow/craftsman
NRHP reference # 06001105 [1]
Added to NRHPNovember 28, 2006

Thomas Wadley Raoul House, also known as Raoulwood, is a historic home located at Asheville, Buncombe County, North Carolina. It was built in 1923, and is a two-story, hollow tile and wood frame dwelling in the Tudor Revival style. It is clad in stucco with half-timbering and has a hipped and gable slate roof. It measures 92 feet, 6 inches long and 20 to 30 feet deep. Also on the property is a contributing servant's cottage (1923) in the Bungalow style. [2]

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2006. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. Samuel A. Bingham, III (February 2006). "Thomas Wadley Raoul House" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2014-08-01.