Thomas Wadley Raoul House

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Thomas Wadley Raoul House
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Location394 Vanderbilt Rd., Asheville, North Carolina
Coordinates 35°32′3″N82°32′24″W / 35.53417°N 82.54000°W / 35.53417; -82.54000 Coordinates: 35°32′3″N82°32′24″W / 35.53417°N 82.54000°W / 35.53417; -82.54000
Area3.5 acres (1.4 ha)
Built1923 (1923)
Built byMerchant Construction Co.
ArchitectParker, Charles N.
Architectural styleTudor Revival, Bungalow/craftsman
NRHP reference # 06001105 [1]
Added to NRHPNovember 28, 2006

Thomas Wadley Raoul House, also known as Raoulwood, is a historic home located at Asheville, Buncombe County, North Carolina. It was built in 1923, and is a two-story, hollow tile and wood frame dwelling in the Tudor Revival style. It is clad in stucco with half-timbering and has a hipped and gable slate roof. It measures 92 feet, 6 inches long and 20 to 30 feet deep. Also on the property is a contributing servant's cottage (1923) in the Bungalow style. [2]

Asheville, North Carolina City in North Carolina, United States

Asheville is a city and the county seat of Buncombe County, North Carolina, United States. It is the largest city in Western North Carolina, and the 12th-most populous city in the U.S. state of North Carolina. The city's population was 89,121 according to 2016 estimates. It is the principal city in the five-county Asheville metropolitan area, with a population of 424,858 in 2010.

Buncombe County, North Carolina U.S. county in North Carolina, United States

Buncombe County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. The 2010 census said the population was 238,318. Its county seat is Asheville.

Tudor Revival architecture architectural style

Tudor Revival architecture first manifested itself in domestic architecture in the United Kingdom in the latter half of the 19th century. Based on revival of aspects that were perceived as Tudor architecture, in reality it usually took the style of English vernacular architecture of the Middle Ages that had survived into the Tudor period. The style later became an influence elsewhere, especially the British colonies. For example, in New Zealand, the architect Francis Petre adapted the style for the local climate. In Singapore, then a British colony, architects such as R. A. J. Bidwell pioneered what became known as the Black and White House. The earliest examples of the style originate with the works of such eminent architects as Norman Shaw and George Devey, in what at the time was thought Neo-Tudor design.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2006. [1]

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. 2010-07-09.
  2. Samuel A. Bingham, III (February 2006). "Thomas Wadley Raoul House" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2014-08-01.