Thomas Warren (Royal Navy officer)

Last updated
Thomas Warren
Died 12 November 1699
AllegianceFlag of England.svg  Kingdom of England
Union flag 1606 (Kings Colors).svg  Kingdom of Great Britain
Service/branchBritish-Red-Ensign-1707.svg  Royal Navy
Years of service –1698
Rank Commodore
Commands held HMS Hopewell
HMS Sweepstakes
HMS Crown
HMS Grafton
HMS Monck
HMS Windsor
Commander-in-Chief, West Indies
Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth
Battles/wars

Commodore Thomas Warren (died 12 November 1699) was a Royal Navy officer who became Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth.

Commodore (Royal Navy) senior rank of the Royal Navy

Commodore (Cdre) is a rank of the Royal Navy above captain and below rear admiral. It has a NATO ranking code of OF-6. The rank is equivalent to brigadier in the British Army and Royal Marines and to air commodore in the Royal Air Force.

Royal Navy Maritime warfare branch of the United Kingdoms military

The Royal Navy (RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years War against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service.

Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth former operational commander of the Royal Navy

The Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth was a senior commander of the Royal Navy for hundreds of years. Portsmouth Command was a name given to the units, establishments, and staff operating under the post. The commanders-in-chief were based at premises in High Street, Portsmouth from the 1790s until the end of Sir Thomas Williams's tenure, his successor, Sir Philip Durham, being the first to move into Admiralty House at the Royal Navy Dockyard, where subsequent holders of the office were based until 1969. Prior to World War One the officer holder was sometimes referred to in official dispatches as the Commander-in-Chief, Spithead.

Promoted to captain on 28 May 1689, Warren was given command of the fifth-rate HMS Hopewell in 1690, the fifth-rate HMS Sweepstakes in 1691 and the fourth-rate HMS Crown in 1692. [1] In the Crown he took part in the action at Barfleur in May 1692 and the action at La Hogue in June 1692. [1] He went on to command the third-rate HMS Grafton in 1693, the third-rate HMS Monck in 1694 and the fourth-rate HMS Windsor in 1695. [1] He was appointed Commander-in-Chief, West Indies in May 1696 and Commander-in-Chief, Portsmouth in December 1698. [1] [2]

Captain (Royal Navy) senior officer rank of the Royal Navy

Captain (Capt) is a senior officer rank of the Royal Navy. It ranks above commander and below commodore and has a NATO ranking code of OF-5. The rank is equivalent to a colonel in the British Army and Royal Marines, and to a group captain in the Royal Air Force. There are similarly named equivalent ranks in the navies of many other countries.

In the rating system of the British Royal Navy used to categorise sailing warships, a fifth rate was the penultimate class of warships in a hierarchical system of six "ratings" based on size and firepower.

In the rating system of the British Royal Navy used to categorise sailing warships, a fourth-rate was a ship of the line with 46 to 60 guns mounted.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Thomas Warren". Three Decks. Retrieved 11 March 2018.
  2. Lincoln, Margarette (2016). British Pirates and Society, 1680–1730. Abingdon, England: Routledge. p. 167. ISBN   9781317171676.