Thomas Wetherhead

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Thomas Wetherhead [1] was Archdeacon of Cork and of Cloyne then Bishop of Waterford and Lismore [2] from 1589 until 1592. [3]

Archdeacon of Cork

The Archdeacon of Cork was a senior ecclesiastical officer within the Anglican Diocese of Cork, Cloyne and Ross.As such he or she was responsible for the disciplinary supervision of the clergy within the Diocese.

Archdeacon of Cloyne

The Archdeacon of Cloyne was a senior ecclesiastical officer within the Diocese of Cloyne until 1835; and then within the Diocese of Cork, Cloyne and Ross until 1986 when it merged with the Archdeaconry of Cork. As such he was responsible for the disciplinary supervision of the clergy within the Cloyne Diocese.

The Bishop of Waterford and Lismore is an episcopal title which takes its name after the city of Waterford and town of Lismore in the Republic of Ireland. The title was used by the Church of Ireland until 1838, and is still used by the Roman Catholic Church.

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References

  1. Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (Third ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 407–408. ISBN   0-521-56350-X.
  2. Cotton, Henry (1851). The Succession of the Prelates and Members of the Cathedral Bodies of Ireland. Fasti ecclesiae Hiberniae. Vol. 1, The Province of Munster (2nd Edition, corrected and enlarged ed.). Dublin: Hodges and Smith. pp. 119–124.
  3. Moody, T. W.; Martin, F. X.; Byrne, F. J., eds. (1984). Maps, Genealogies, Lists: A Companion to Irish History, Part II. New History of Ireland: Volume XI. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 422–423. ISBN   0-19-821745-5.