Thompson Ridge

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Thompson Ridge ( 76°27′S146°5′W / 76.450°S 146.083°W / -76.450; -146.083 Coordinates: 76°27′S146°5′W / 76.450°S 146.083°W / -76.450; -146.083 ) is a rock ridge, 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) long and trending north-south on the south shore of Block Bay, 3.5 nautical miles (6 km) northwest of Mount Iphigene, in Marie Byrd Land. The feature was photographed and mapped by the United States Antarctic Service (USAS), 1939–41, led by Byrd. The naming was proposed by Admiral Byrd for Gershom J. Thompson, eminent doctor and professor at the Mayo Clinic, who advised on medical questions relating to the Byrd Antarctic Expeditions, 1928–30 and 1933–35, and made financial contributions to them.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Block Bay is a long ice-filled bay lying east of Guest Peninsula along the coast of Marie Byrd Land. It was discovered in 1929 by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, and named by Richard E. Byrd for Paul Block, newspaper publisher and patron of the expedition.

Marie Byrd Land geographic region

Marie Byrd Land is the portion of West Antarctica lying east of the Ross Ice Shelf and the Ross Sea and south of the Pacific Ocean, extending eastward approximately to a line between the head of the Ross Ice Shelf and Eights Coast. It stretches between 158°W and 103°24'W. The inclusion of the area between the Rockefeller Plateau and Eights Coast is based upon the leading role of the American Rear Admiral Richard E. Byrd in the exploration of this area. The name was originally applied by Admiral Byrd in 1929, in honor of his wife, to the northwestern part of the area, the part that was explored in that year.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Thompson Ridge" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.

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Hammond Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Hammond Glacier is located on the northeast side of the Haines Mountains, flowing northwest for about 40 nautical miles (70 km) to Sulzberger Ice Shelf in the Ford Ranges of Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica. It was discovered in 1934 by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, and named by Richard E. Byrd for John Hays Hammond, an American mining engineer and philanthropist.

The Birchall Peaks are a group of peaks 3 nautical miles (6 km) west of Mount Iphigene, on the south side of Block Bay in Marie Byrd Land. They were discovered in 1929 by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, and were named by Richard E. Byrd for Frederick T. Birchall, a member of the staff of the New York Times which published the expedition's press dispatches.

The Brown Peaks are a series of low peaks surmounting a ridge 4 nautical miles (7 km) long, standing 7 miles (11 km) east of Robinson Bluff at the east side of Amundsen Glacier. First roughly mapped from ground surveys and from air photos by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, 1928–30, they were named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Kenneth R. Brown, a biologist with the McMurdo Station winter party of 1964.

Butcher Nunatak is a nunatak at the south end of the Birchall Peaks, 4 nautical miles (7 km) southwest of Swarm Peak, in the Ford Ranges of Marie Byrd Land. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and from U.S. Navy air photos (1959–65), and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Robert S. Butcher, builder, U.S. Navy, at Byrd Station in 1967.

Mount Noville is a mountain, 2,410 m, standing between Van Reeth and Robison Glaciers and 4 nautical miles (7 km) east of Mount Bowlin, in the Queen Maud Mountains. Discovered by the geological party under Quin Blackburn of the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, 1933–35, and named by Byrd for George O. Noville, executive officer of the expedition.

Mount Nichols is a mountain, 670 m, in the central part of the Harold Byrd Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from ground surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-63. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for William L. Nichols, construction mechanic with the Byrd Station winter party in 1957.

Mount Dane is a mountain 3 nautical miles (6 km) west-northwest of Eilefsen Peak in the north part of Radford Island, lying in Sulzberger Ice Shelf off the coast of Marie Byrd Land. The mountain was probably first seen on aerial flights by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition (1928–30). It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for F.S. Dane, a dog driver with the Byrd Antarctic Expedition (1933–35).

Summit Ridge is a ridge, 380 m, with a steep ice slope on the north side and a rock cliff on the south side. It extends eastward from Passes Peak for 0.5 nautical miles (0.9 km) and is located 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) south of the head of Hope Bay at the northeast end of Antarctic Peninsula. This area was first explored by the Swedish Antarctic Expedition, 1901-04. Summit Ridge was first charted and named by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), 1945. The feature takes its name from nearby Summit Pass.

Suggs Peak is a small ice-covered peak 6 nautical miles (11 km) south-southwest of Mount Wilbanks in the Kohler Range, Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos 1959-66. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for James D. Suggs United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) geologist with the Marie Byrd Land Survey Party, 1966-67.

Mutel Peak is a rock peak 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) southwest of Mount Iphigene in the Ford Ranges, Marie Byrd Land. Photographed and roughly plotted by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, 1928–30, and United States Antarctic Service (USAS), 1939-41. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1959-65. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Robert L. Mutel, ionospheric physicist at Byrd Station, 1969.

Tumbledown Cliffs is a conspicuous rock cliffs on the west coast of James Ross Island, about 3 nautical miles (6 km) north of Cape Obelisk. Probably first seen by Dr. Otto Nordenskjöld in 1903. Surveyed by Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1945. The name given by United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) is descriptive of the formation of the scree slope at the foot of these cliffs.

Post Ridge is a rock ridge, 3 nautical miles (6 km) long and trending WNW-ESE, situated immediately northeast of Mount Swan in the Ford Ranges, Marie Byrd Land. Discovered and first mapped by the United States Antarctic Service (USAS), 1939-41. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Madison J. Post, ionospheric physicist at Byrd Station in 1970.

Marsh Ridge is a rocky ridge in Antarctica, 3 nautical miles (6 km) long. It stands midway along the south side of Leverett Glacier and 11 nautical miles (20 km) east-northeast of Mount Gould. The ridge was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from ground surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–63, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Robert D. Marsh, a cook with the Byrd Station winter party, 1957.

The Hill Peaks are a small group of peaks 2 nautical miles (4 km) southwest of Mount Dane in the western part of Radford Island, lying in the Sulzberger Ice Shelf off the coast of Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica. The peaks were probably first observed by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition (1928–30) on an aerial flight of December 5, 1929, and were named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Joseph Hill, Jr., a mechanic and driver with the 1933–35 Byrd expedition.

King Ridge is a narrow rock ridge, 3 nautical miles (6 km) long, lying 2 nautical miles (4 km) southwest of Wrigley Bluffs in the Anderson Hills in the central Patuxent Range of the Pensacola Mountains, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–66. The ridge was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names at the suggestion of Captain Finn Ronne, U.S. Navy Reserve, leader at Ellsworth Station, 1957: Colonel J. Caldwell King, U.S. Army, had assisted Ronne in obtaining support for the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition, 1947–48.

Mackey Rock is an isolated rock on the east side of the Sulzberger Ice Shelf, 8 nautical miles (15 km) southwest of Mount Iphigene, on the coast of Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos (1959–65), and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Steven Mackey, a field assistant with the United States Antarctic Research Program Marie Byrd Land Survey II, summer 1967–68.

Maigetter Peak

Maigetter Peak is a rock peak, the northernmost of the Birchall Peaks, on the south shore of Block Bay in Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica. It was discovered by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition (1928–30) and plotted from photos taken on the flight of December 5, 1929. The peak was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos (1959–65), and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Robert Z. Maigetter, a biologist with the United States Antarctic Research Program Marie Byrd Land Survey II, 1967–68.

Manfull Ridge is a broad snow-covered ridge that descends gently from the north side of the Kohler Range about 5 nautical miles (9 km) west of Morrison Bluff, in Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from ground surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1959–71, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Byron P. Manfull of the U.S. Department of State, Chairman of the Interagency Committee on Antarctica, 1967–69.

Radford Island is an ice-covered island surmounted by several peaks, lying 6 nautical miles (11 km) west of Saunders Mountain in the east part of Sulzberger Ice Shelf. Discovered by the Byrd Antarctic Expedition on the Eastern Flight of December 5, 1929. This feature was mapped as a part of the mainland by the United States Antarctic Service (USAS) (1939–1941) and named "Radford Mountains." It was determined to be an island by the U.S. Geological Survey from air photos taken by the U.S. Navy, 1962-1965. Named by Byrd for V. Admiral Arthur W. Radford, U.S. Navy, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Air) during the exploration by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump (1946–1947) and later Admiral and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.