Thor: Son of Asgard

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Thor: Son of Asgard
Thor Son of Asgard TPB.jpg
Cover to Thor: Son of Asgard: The Warriors Teen trade paperback.
Publication information
Publisher Marvel Comics
ScheduleMonthly
Format Ongoing series
Genre
Publication dateMarch 2004 – January 2005
No. of issues12
Main character(s) Thor
Sif
Balder
Loki
Creative team
Written by Akira Yoshida [1]
Artist(s) Greg Tocchini
Penciller(s) Greg Tocchini (comic)
Adi Granov (cover #1-6)
Jo Chen (cover #7-12)
Inker(s) Jay Leisten
Letterer(s) Randy Gentile
Colorist(s) Guru eFX
Editor(s) Joe Quesada
MacKenzie Cadenhead
Collected editions
Thor: Son of Asgard ISBN   978-0-7851-4156-3

Thor: Son of Asgard is a comic book series published by Marvel Comics from March 2004 to January 2005. Written by Akira Yoshida and illustrated by Greg Tocchini, the series follows Thor's early adventures in Asgard with Sif and Balder. [2] It was originally a limited series of six issues but, thanks to popular demand, it was later extended to an ongoing series that lasted for twelve issues in total. [2] [3] [4]

Comic book Publication of comics art

A comic book or comicbook, also called comic magazine or simply comic, is a publication that consists of comics art in the form of sequential juxtaposed panels that represent individual scenes. Panels are often accompanied by descriptive prose and written narrative, usually, dialog contained in word balloons emblematic of the comics art form. Although comics has some origins in 18th century Japan, comic books were first popularized in the United States and the United Kingdom during the 1930s. The first modern comic book, Famous Funnies, was released in the U.S. in 1933 and was a reprinting of earlier newspaper humor comic strips, which had established many of the story-telling devices used in comics. The term comic book derives from American comic books once being a compilation of comic strips of a humorous tone; however, this practice was replaced by featuring stories of all genres, usually not humorous in tone.

Marvel Comics Company that publishes comic books and related media

Marvel Comics is the brand name and primary imprint of Marvel Worldwide Inc., formerly Marvel Publishing, Inc. and Marvel Comics Group, a publisher of American comic books and related media. In 2009, The Walt Disney Company acquired Marvel Entertainment, Marvel Worldwide's parent company.

Notable events of 2004 in comics. See also List of years in comics.

Contents

Plot

The series is composed of three storylines: "The Warriors Teen" (issues #1-6), [5] "Enchanted" (issues #7-9), [6] and "Worthy" (issues #10-12). [7]

The Warriors Teen

In Thor: Son of Asgard #1-6, titled "The Warriors Teen," Thor and his friends, Sif and Balder, have sneaked into the trophy room and Thor tries to lift Mjolnir, without success. He states that someday, he will be worthy enough to lift it. Three giant spiders enchanted by Loki attack them. Working together, the three young warriors defeat them. After this feat, Odin decides to send them on a quest to find four mystical elements that will then be fashioned into an enchanted blade. [8] The four items are: [8] a scale from the dragon Hakurei; a feather from the snow eagle Gnori; a jewel from a mine of Jennia; and a vial of water from the Lake of Lilitha.

Mjolnir (comics) Hammer of the god Thor in the Marvel Comics universe

Mjolnir, known more formally as Mjölnir is a fictional mythical weapon appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. It is depicted as the principal weapon of the superheroes Thor and Jane Foster. Mjolnir, which first appears in Journey into Mystery #83, was created by writer Stan Lee and designed by artists Jack Kirby and Joe Sinnott.

Loki (comics) comic book character

Loki is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. Created by writer Stan Lee, scripter Larry Lieber and penciller Jack Kirby, a version of the character first appeared in Venus #6. The modern day incarnation of Loki first appeared in Journey into Mystery #85. The character, which is based on the Norse deity of the same name, is the Asgardian god of mischief. He is the adopted brother and often enemy of the superhero Thor, however over the years the character has been depicted as an antihero.

Both the Norn Queen Karnilla and Loki learn of the quest [8] and separately try to stop the trio from completing it. [9] However, when Karnilla captures Loki [10] and attempts to convince him to aid her in overthrowing Odin, he refuses and instead informs Thor, Sif, and Balder of her plan. [11] Sif, Balder, and Loki return to Odin to prepare for Karnilla's attack, while Thor completes the quest. [11]

Karnilla fictional character

Karnilla is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics.

After the attack, Karnilla kills Thor with an arrow, [11] but he is revived by the healing power of water from the lake and Sif's tears of love. Then the Norn Queen menaces the life of Loki. Balder offers his life in exchange for Loki's. He explains his action by the value of life and that there is good in every soul. Karnilla flees. [12]

One month after the battle, the enchanted blade is finished. During a banquet, Odin presents the sword Svaden and gives it to Balder for his mercy and compassion. [12]

Enchanted

In Thor: Son of Asgard #7-9, titled "Enchanted," Sif is the only girl in a class of male warriors until the arrival of Brunnhilda. With this female warrior and Amora, Sif now has now two rivals in the competition for Thor's affections. [13] The two blondes remind her that she lost her golden hair, after Loki jealously cut it and replaced it with enchanted black hair made by dwarves. Taking advantage of her vulnerability, Amora and Loki work together to trick Sif into stealing the Mirror of Mycha. [14]

The Mirror of Mycha is an enchanted mirror that, when the proper spell is cast upon it, will cause the person who is looking into it to fall in love with the person holding it. The legend says that only a woman's touch can give life to the mirror. [14]

Loki casts the spell. Amora steals the mirror from Sif and uses it on Thor. [14] Brunnhilda and Sif decide to fight together against the sorcerers. During the fight, Brunnhilda breaks the mirror and the spell over Thor vanishes. Sif has to apologize and explain why she would have tricked him with the Mirror of Mycha. Thor forgives her and they exchange their first kiss. [15]

Worthy

In Thor: Son of Asgard #10-12, titled "Worthy," Thor, frustrated by his incapacity to wield the hammer Mjolnir, decides to travel to the Norns to learn how to succeed. They tell him that he must first face death. After his return to Asgard, he discovers that the Storm Giants have attacked the city and kidnapped Sif. Odin tells Thor to stay and guard Asgard and he and the gods will go rescue her. Due to his feeling for the young woman, Thor disobeys his father and finds himself worthy to lift Mjolnir. [16]

On his horse Treibold, Thor travels to Jotunheim. He defeats many Storm Giants to face Rugga, their king. Rugga tells him he was offered immortality by the Goddess of Death, Hela, if he turned Sif over to her. Thor goes to confront Hela. [17] During the confrontation, Hela threatens to kill Sif. However, when Thor offers himself in her place, Hela decides against killing him because it would not break Odin's heart as she had hoped since Thor would die an honorable death. [18]

Development

Originally, the dialogue was supposed to be written in "old world" style as in other Marvel comics with Asgardians; however, Marvel chose finally to use a more modern tone. Akira Yoshida explained, "The first issue was lettered and I had already seen the proofs when my wonderful editor MacKenzie Cadenhead called and said that the general feeling at Marvel seemed to be to make the dialogue more colloquial. She explained that we should tone down the THYs and HATHs and NAYs, so younger comic fans could pick up the book and enjoy it as well without getting turned off by the older-sounding language." [4]

Collected editions

Digests

Trade paperbacks

Public reception

In other media

Animated film

An animated film titled Thor: Tales of Asgard was released in May 2011.

Related Research Articles

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Odin (comics) comic book character

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References

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